Earth & Environmental Science

Employment Opportunities

Hydrologists and geomorphologists work to protect the quality of water in aquifers, rivers, lakes, estuaries, and oceans to make sure they comply with the federal Clean Water Act or related state legislation.  They may work directly with state agencies or private firms as spills and releases are identified and cleaned up.  They may also work with wastewater treatment and disposal issues or landfill sites.  Positions include: Federal and state agencies, industry, consulting firms, and education.

Wetland scientists work at the interface between earth sciences, biology, chemistry and hydrology, and act as scientists, managers and wetland policy experts.  A working knowledge of the structure and function of wetlands, in addition to experience with laws, regulations and the interaction between government and private industry is a prerequisite.

Environmental geologists/hydrogeologists determine the suitability of land for commercial or industrial development; identify the geological and hydrogeological impacts of proposed projects; and analyze the characteristics and extent of ground water and soil contamination at hazardous waste sites, as well as recommend and coordinate cleanups.  Positions include: Federal and state agencies, industry, consulting firms, and education.

Ground water quality scientists work to protect the ground water from contamination and to clean up already contaminated ground water, especially water used for drinking supplies.  Field work may involve sampling; interpreting data; supervising installation of and monitoring wells; overseeing excavation of contaminated materials; and responding to spills and accidents that may jeopardize ground water quality.  Positions include: Federal, state, and local agencies; industry; consulting firms; and education.

GIS/remote sensing specialists gather, analyze, interpret, and display natural resource information that will be used by scientists and policymakers.  They work with aerial photographs, color infrared photographs, radar imagery, and multispectral scanning (satellite imagery).  Positions include: Federal, state, and local agencies; consulting firms; and education.

Air quality scientists interpret complex air quality regulations, monitor indoor and outdoor emissions, and design/implement mitigation technologies to bring emissions into compliance.  These specialists also research the effects of air pollutants and their interactions with various aspects of the environment. Positions include: Federal, state, and local government agencies; industry; consulting firms; and education.

Environmental policy analysts work to develop or change government policies, laws, and regulations related to air quality; surface and/or ground water quality; solid and hazardous waste management; and environmental health and safety.  Positions include: Federal, state, and local agencies; industry; consulting firms; and education.

Hazardous waste management specialists work in all aspects of hazardous waste management, from compliance auditing to plant personnel training and spill contingency planning.  Positions include: Federal and state agencies, industry, consulting firms, and education.

Regulatory compliance specialists are concerned with the vast array of federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations.  Their work includes: interpreting complex regulations; evaluating new pollution control technologies for air, water, soil or hazardous wastes; providing guidance on regulatory procedures for proposed projects; monitoring air and water quality; tracking proposed legislation; and keeping the regulated community informed.  Positions include: Federal, state, and local agencies; industry; consulting firms; and education.



Course Catalog

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