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February 22, 2008
Vol. 49 No. 16

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Club sells hats to benefit Ugandan schools

Courtesy of Courtesy of Sarah Fiorini
Fundraiser -- Susquehanna's Invisible Children chapter is selling hats, pictured above, to raise money to rebuild schools in Uganda.
Trucker hats are back at Susquehanna, but this time with a purpose.

The Susquehanna Invisible Children chapter is selling the classic hats as a fundraiser to rebuild schools in Uganda, according to junior Sarah Fiorini, president of Invisible Children.

According to InvisibleChild-ren.com, the money raised through fundraising efforts goes to "provide everything from essentials like water, books and teachers, to new classrooms and technology."

The hats are trucker hats with patches in the shape of Africa sewn on them. A heart button is sewn where Uganda would be. Hats are sold for $10 each or $15 for two.

Fiorini said, "Another school's Invisible Children club actually came up with this fundraiser last year, and we just really liked the idea, so we decided to give it a try this year."

According to Fiorini, the club has been working on the hats since mid-February. The club members will continue to make hats until they are all sold.

Club members drop off completed hats and pick up new ones to work on at the club's weekly meetings, Fiorini said.

"The hats are being sewn with fabric we have, but if anyone has a special fabric they want used, it's not a problem at all. We've already custom-made a few hats," she said.

According to Fiorini, Susquehanna's Invisible Children chapter started after the national Invisible Children organization came to campus to present its documentary.

Invisible Children's mission statement, as found on Invisible-Children.com, says, "Invisible Children improves the quality of life for war-affected children by providing access to quality education, enhanced learning environments and innovative economic opportunities for the community."

Although the club has only been on campus for about a year, selling the hats is already its second major fundraiser.

"Last year, we had an auction called Chains for Charity where we auctioned off male athletes. We fundraised over $1,000 from that," Fiorini said. "We will also be holding that auction again in the spring this year."

In addition to campus fund-raising, the national Invisible Children organization has a number of other fundraising opportunities. The Tri Campaign is a large event where students donate $3 a week to Invisible Children. According to InvisibleChildren.com, the money raised through this campaign supports changes in culture, policy and lives.

Invisible Children also hosts the Bracelet Campaign. This campaign provides jobs within the community while raising awareness around the world, according to InvisibleChild-ren.com.

Each bracelet is hand-made in Uganda using reed and recycled wire. The bracelets are sold in the United States along with a video telling the story of children affected by the war.

Other fundraising ideas are posted on InvisibleChildren.com under Schools for Schools.
Fiorini said the hat fundraiser "is not a nationwide effort, but other schools might be doing this fundraiser as well because it was featured on Invisible Children's Schools for Schools Web site last year."

Those interested in purchasing a hat can contact Fiorini. Invisible Children meets at 9:30 p.m. every Tuesday in Bogar Hall Room 102.

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