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NPR Host Hanna Rosin to Discuss Responses to Conflict
Susquehanna University
Hanna Rosin

September 19, 2017

Award-winning journalist Hanna Rosin will deliver Susquehanna University's annual common reading lecture on Oct. 2 at 7:30 p.m. in Weber Chapel Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

What happens when we respond to conflict in the opposite way people expect us to? Rosin addresses the 2017-18 university theme, conflict, by explaining the concept of "noncomplementarity." Using real-life stories and experiments, Rosin will discuss how noncomplementarity-behavior that is unexpected for a given situation-can lead to fascinating results. The lecture will be followed by a Q&A, book signing and reception in Weber Chapel Lobby.

Rosin is the co-host of NPR's Invisibilia, a show about the unseen forces that control human behavior-our ideas, beliefs, assumptions and thoughts. Her career includes writing for The Atlantic and Slate, appearing on The Daily Show, The Colbert Report and The Today Show and headlining at the first TEDWomen conference. She is author of The End of Men: And the Rise of Women and God's Harvard: A Christian College on a Mission to Save America.

Rosin's report, "How a Danish Town Helped Young Muslims Turn Away from ISIS," appears in the university's common reading anthology.

The goal of Susquehanna's Common Reading Program is to create a shared academic experience and point of discussion for first-year students. New students enrolling at Susquehanna for the 2017-18 academic year received a collection of short readings, titled Perspectives on Conflict, to read over the summer. They discussed the anthology with their peers and professors during Welcome Week in August.

Throughout the year, the university presents various lectures and events encouraging students to explore and discuss that year's theme. The annual theme is chosen through student, faculty and staff suggestions and guides a year-long campuswide conversation.

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