Federal COVID Funding on the Way to Eligible Students

Masked student sitting outside on a bench

February 25, 2021

Susquehanna University this week will begin distributing one-time, emergency student aid grants through the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act.

At Susquehanna, 1,880 students – 88% of SU’s total enrollment – are eligible to receive the $1,095,606 student-aid portion of the CRRSAA. This aggregate allotment matches the total amount of CARES Act funding Susquehanna provided its students last spring. Disbursement will be based on each student’s 2020-21 FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) and will range from $200 to $1,280.

“Susquehanna is committed to helping our students overcome the challenges the COVID-19 pandemic has presented,” said University President Jonathan Green. “We remain grateful to our partners at the U.S. Department of Education and in the U.S. Congress for supporting us in this mission by making these grants available to our students.”

These grant funds will be direct payments to students for emergency costs (such as tuition, food, housing, course materials, technology, health care and childcare) that arose due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Eligible students do not have to take any action to receive the funds. Students who opted to receive electronic refunds will receive grants electronically. All other students will receive a check mailed to their address on file.

CRRSAA was authorized by Congress as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021. The CRRSAA created two separate formula-based grants for colleges and universities: one portion for the direct aid to students (equal at the very least to the amount institutions spent on student grants as required under the CARES Act) and the other focused on supporting institutional costs associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Over the last year, Susquehanna refunded approximately $8.5 million to its students for unused, prorated housing and meal plan payments. The university continues to allow student employees who have chosen to study remotely to continue their campus employment if their tasks can be completed from afar, providing them continued financial support and professional experiences. Susquehanna has also loaned laptops and provided other technology to support students unable to access technology for remote learning.

The university has also created a Student Care Fund, supported by private donations, to support a broader range of students with demonstrated financial need, including international students and others who are not eligible to receive CRRSAA funds.

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