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Chemical Physics

Double-counting restriction: students majoring in chemical physics cannot double-count courses towards a chemistry or physics major.

The Bachelor of Science degree in chemical physics requires the following courses with grades of C- or better: 

Semester Hours View Full Course Catalog >>

 4        General Chemistry I (Choose from: CHEM-101, CHEM-103 or CHEM-111)

 4        General Chemistry II (Choose from: CHEM-102, CHEM-104 or CHEM-112)

 4        Introductory Physics I: Calculus (Choose from: PHYS-203 or PHYS-204)

 4        Introductory Physics II: Calculus (PHYS-206)

4 CHEM-221 Organic Chemistry I
4 CHEM-341 Physical Chemistry I
4 CHEM-342 Physical Chemistry II
4 PHYS-404 Thermodynamics and Statistical Methods
4 MATH-111 Calculus I
4 MATH-112 Calculus II
4 MATH-201 Linear Algebra

 4        Capstone, chosen from CHEM-500 Problems in Chemistry or PHYS-550 Physics Research

Other requirements: Students must select at least four courses from the following list, with at least one course from each department and no more than two courses from a single department. Students may take additional courses as long as the total number of semester hours in the major does not exceed 64.

Chemistry

CHEM-306 Nanoscience

CHEM-430 Instrumental Analysis

Mathematics

MATH-211 Multivariate Calculus

MATH-353 Differential Equations

Physics

PHYS-101 Introduction to Digital and Analog Electronics

PHYS-105 Independent Thought and Exploration in Physics

PHYS-306 Modern Physics

CHEM-100 Trends in Chemistry

Emphasizes the use of chemistry by society and in nature. This course presents the basic chemical concepts in a variety of contexts. Subjects might include environmentally friendly green chemistry, medicinal, nanotechnology, chemistry of movies and magic, or chemistry of everyday objects. Students who have completed General Chemistry I (CHEM-101, CHEM-103 or CHEM-111) may not enroll in CHEM-100.  4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. CC: Scientific Explanations.

CHEM-101 General Chemistry I

Fundamental laws and principles, atomic structure and periodicity, bonding, molecular structure, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, energy, gases, liquids and solids. Students may receive credit for only one of the three introductory chemistry I courses, CHEM‐101, CHEM‐103, or CHEM‐111. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours (taken as CHEM-105, not a separate credit/grade). CC: Scientific Explanations. 


 

CHEM-102 General Chemistry II

Properties of solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, buffers, solubility, complex ion equilibria, entropy, fee energy, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Students may receive credit for only one of the three introductory chemistry II courses, CHEM‐102, CHEM‐104, or CHEM‐112. (CHEM‐221 is the next level.)  4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours (taken as CHEM-106, not a separate credit/grade).   

CHEM-103 General Chemistry I: Teams

Fundamental laws and principles, atomic structure and periodicity, bonding, molecular structure, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, energy, gases, liquids and solids taught in a team‐based format. Students may receive credit for only one of the three introductory chemistry I courses, CHEM‐101, CHEM‐103, or CHEM‐111. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours (taken as CHEM-105, not a separate credit/grade). CC: Scientific Explanations, Team Intensive. 

CHEM-104 General Chemistry II: Teams

Properties of solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, buffers, solubility, complex ion equilibria, entropy, fee energy, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry taught in a team‐based format. CHEM‐221 is the next level. Students may receive credit for only one of the three introductory chemistry II courses: CHEM‐102, CHEM‐104 or CHEM‐112. (CHEM‐221 is the next level.)  4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours (taken as CHEM-106, not a separate credit/grade). CC: Team Intensive. 

CHEM-111 General Chemistry I: Teams WS

Fundamental laws and principles, atomic structure and periodicity, bonding, molecular structure, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, energy, gases, liquids and solids taught in a team‐based workshop format, with the lab and lecture integrated. Students may receive credit for only one of the three introductory chemistry I courses, CHEM‐101, CHEM‐103, or CHEM‐111. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. CC: Scientific Explanations, Team Intensive.

CHEM-112 General Chemistry II: Teams WS

Properties of solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acids, bases, buffers, solubility, complex ion equilibria, entropy, fee energy, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry taught in a team‐based workshop format, with the lab and lecture integrated. Students may receive credit for only one of the three introductory chemistry II courses: CHEM‐102, CHEM‐104, or CHEM‐112. (CHEM‐221 is the next level.)  4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. CC: Team Intensive.



CHEM-221 Organic Chemistry I

Basic concepts of stereochemistry and chemistry of aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides and alcohols. Prerequisite: CHEM‐102, CHEM‐104 or CHEM‐112. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours (taken concurrently with lecture).

 

CHEM-222 Organic Chemistry II

Basic concepts of spectroscopy, and chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons, conjugated alkenes, amines, ethers, carbonyl compounds, carboxylic acid derivatives, and building blocks for biomacromolecules. Prerequisite: CHEM‐221. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours (taken concurrently with lecture). CC: Writing Intensive.



CHEM-231 Quantitative Analysis

Classical analytical methods for quantitative determination of chemical species. Techniques are selected from volumetric, gravimetric, potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods. Prerequisites: CHEM-101-102, CHEM-103-104 or CHEM-111-112. 4 SH. 2 lecture hours, 2 three-hour laboratories.

CHEM-300 Topics in Chemistry

Varied topics reflecting student and instructor interests. Possibilities include organometallic chemistry, environmental chemistry, green chemistry, proteomics and chemistry of art. Prerequisite: CHEM-222 (may be others for some topics). 1-4 SH. Offered as lecture only, laboratory only, or as a lecture/laboratory combination.

CHEM-302 Medicinal Chemistry

This course integrates principles from the disciplines of chemistry, biology and pharmacology to study the discovery, design and mechanisms of action of important anticancer, antiviral, antibacterial, cardioprotective and antidepressant drugs. Major emphasis is placed on drug interactions with nucleic acids, enzymes and receptors. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CHEM-222. 4 SH. Offered as lecture only. CC: Interdisciplinary. 

CHEM-303 Scientific Ethics, Blunders, and Fraud

Examines the science and the scientific method through the lens of ethics to distinguish scientific error from outright fraud. The course looks at classic and contemporary scientific blunders and fraud cases in academia, industry and government. Examines ethical policy from the fallout of academic fraud. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and CHEM-222. 4 SH. CC: Ethics Intensive, Interdisciplinary.

CHEM-304 Pharmaceutical Chemistry

In this course students will learn about partition coefficient and biopharmacy, physicochemical properties of drugs, stereochemistry, drug metabolism, volumetric analysis of drugs, analytical spectroscopy, stability of drugs and medicines, kinetics of drug stability, licensing of drugs and the British Pharmacopoeia, method validation, and GMPs. Prerequisite: Junior standing and CHEM-222. 4 SH. 4 lecture hour (may be taught 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours). CC: Interdisciplinary.

CHEM-305 Forensic Chemistry

This course approaches the challenges, methods, analyses and ethics of forensic chemistry from fundamental chemical and biological perspectives, including quality assurance, sampling and evidence collection and preservation, instrumentation, drugs as physical evidence, analysis of seized drugs, drugs in the body, forensic toxicology, combustion and arson, explosives, firearms, colorants, polymers, paper and fibers, and forensic DNA analysis. Students will also be able to articulate the basic ethical questions and issues related to the study of forensics. Prerequisite: Junior standing and CHEM-222. 4 SH. 4 lecture hours (may be taught 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours). CC: Ethics Intensive, Interdisciplinary.

CHEM-306 Nanoscience

An introduction to many aspects of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Interdisciplinary connections between chemistry, physics, biology and material science are investigated through readings, discussions and laboratory experiments. Major topics include the formation and implementation of nano-structured systems, synthesis, and detection of nanoparticles, their current roles in technology, medical applications, ethical implications, and the likely future impact of such systems on society, industry and the environment. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and CHEM-222. 4 SH. CC: Interdisciplinary.

CHEM-311 Analytical Chemistry

Chemical species are analyzed by classical quantitative and modern spectrometric methods. Theory of equilibrium, potentiometric, optical, chromatographic and mass spectral techniques are discussed. Laboratories range from volumetric, gravimetric and potentiometric wet techniques to photospectrometric methods (Uv-vis, FT-IR, AA) and mass spectrometry. This class is specifically designed for the chemistry minor and does not count toward the chemistry major, the biochemistry major or as an elective. Prerequisites: CHEM-101-102, CHEM-103-104 or CHEM-111-112. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

CHEM-314 Survey of Biochemistry

A survey of Biochemistry: structure and function of amino acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids; enzymology; metabolism; biosynthesis; and selected topics. Not acceptable for credit toward a major in Chemistry or Biochemistry, nor Biochemistry minor. Prerequisite: CHEM-222 or instructor permission. 4 SH.

CHEM-341 Physical Chemistry I

An in-depth study of classical and statistical thermodynamics and reaction kinetics presented with applications to phase equilibria, chemical equilibria, solute-solvent interactions and nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Prerequisites: CHEM-231; MATH-112; and PHYS-205 (Calculus-based) or instructor's permission. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. CC: Writing Intensive.

CHEM-342 Physical Chemistry II

Introduction to quantum chemistry and spectroscopy. Theory of quantum mechanics presented at a fundamental level with special attention paid to classical problems—particle in a box, harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor and hydrogen atom—and practical application to the electronic structure of atoms and molecules and to atomic and molecular spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CHEM-231, MATH-112 and PHYS-205 (Calculus-based) or instructor's permission. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

CHEM-400 Research Experience

Individual investigation of a novel problem in chemistry or biochemistry in collaboration with a faculty member. Introduction to common methods and techniques used in the chemistry and biochemistry fields. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. 1-4 SH.

CHEM-422 The Biochemistry of Nucleic Acids

This course integrates information from the disciplines of biology and chemistry to explore nucleic acid function and metabolism. In-depth discussions cover the forces behind DNA/DNA, DNA/RNA and DNA/protein interactions as they apply to DNA structure and metabolism, RNA function and metabolism, protein synthesis, and gene regulation. Same as BIOL-422. Prerequisite: CHEM-222. Strongly recommended: BIOL-426/CHEM-426. 3 SH. 3 lecture hours. 

CHEM-423 Biochemistry Nucleic Acids Laboratory

Exploration of nucleic acids, including methods of isolation, purification, identification and analysis. Same as BIOL-423. Prerequisite: CHEM-222. 1 SH. 3 laboratory hours.

CHEM-424 The Biochemistry of Metabolism

This course covers the structure and function of major biomolecules such as carbohydrates and lipids and their role in metabolism. Energy metabolism and biomolecule biosynthesis and degradation are emphasized. Same as BIOL-424. Prerequisite: CHEM-222. Strongly recommended: BIOL-426/CHEM-426. 3 SH. 3 lecture hours. CC: Team Intensive.

CHEM-426 The Biochemistry of Proteins and Enzymes

This course focuses on the structure of proteins, the thermodynamics of protein folding, enzyme catalytic mechanisms and enzyme kinetics. This course also introduces the field of bioinformatics, the use of computer databases to determine relationships between nucleic acid sequence, protein structure and protein function. Same as BIOL-426. Prerequisite: CHEM-222. 3 SH. 3 lecture hours.

CHEM-427 Biochemistry of Proteins and Enzymes Laboratory

This lab explores enzyme kinetics and inhibition, as well as methods of isolation, purification, identification and analysis of proteins and enzymes. This lab is designed to provide technical skills necessary for biochemical research. Same as BIOL-427. Prerequisite: CHEM-222. 1 SH. 3 laboratory hours.

CHEM-429 Biochemistry of Metabolism Laboratory

This lab explores metabolic function and metabolites. The lab focuses on the isolation, purification, identification and analysis of metabolites. Same as BIOL-429. Prerequisite: CHEM-222. 1 SH. 3 laboratory hours. CC: Team Intensive.

CHEM-430 Instrumental Analysis

Instrumental techniques of analysis, focusing on spectroscopy, chromatography and voltammetry. Prerequisite: CHEM-342 or instructor's permission. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

CHEM-450 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Inorganic atomic structure and bonding, coordination compounds, acid-base theory and selected inorganic systems. Prerequisite: CHEM-342. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

CHEM-490 Chemistry Independent Study

Individual work for qualified students under the direction of a faculty member. Usually deals with specialized topics not covered in regularly offered courses. Prerequisites: Instructor and department head approval. 2-4 SH.

CHEM-500 Problems in Chemistry and Biochemistry

Individual study of a problem in experimental chemistry under the direction of a faculty member, and public presentation of the results.  May not be repeated for credit. Co-/Prerequisite: Senior standing and completion of a minimum of 2 semester hours in CHEM-400 during the junior and/or senior year.  2 SH.  Capstone.

CHEM-505 Seminar

Weekly meetings in which students report on current chemical research literature. Researchers from other institutions and industry will also be invited to present their research. Four semester hours in a manner approved by the student's adviser are required for all majors. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Variable credit. CC: Oral Intensive.

CHEM-590 Chemistry Internship

Selected students work in the chemical industry under the supervision of an industrial chemist. Prerequisites: CHEM-231 and department head's permission. 4 SH. S/U grade.

PHYS-100 Introductory Astronomy

A general overview of astronomy, covering ancient and modern views of the solar system and beyond, out to the farthest reaches of the observable universe. The course focuses on building a basic understanding of the physical laws that dictate celestial motions and the processes behind the birth, evolution, and death of objects within the universe, as well as the universe itself. It is a primary goal to demonstrate how the scientific method works and how science builds a testable, coherent understanding of natural phenomena. Includes a laboratory component where students gain hands-on experience and are actively engaged in the process of scientific inquiry. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. CC: Scientific Explanations.

PHYS-101 Introduction to Digital and Analog Electronics

The fundamental principles of digital and analog electronics are introduced, while emphasizing applications. Guided laboratory investigations are designed to develop an understanding of common electronic devices, as well as scientific instrumentation. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. 

PHYS-105 Independent Thought and Explorations in Physics

This course serves as an introduction to how physics developed in the last couple of centuries. The objective of this course is to give the foundations for understanding the cornerstones of physics and a general understanding of the concepts of science. The students will learn how to approach physics problems without a provided outline, and they will be expected to find their own solutions to the assigned problems with subtle but available guidance. The instructors will be on hand for help but will not provide direct solutions to the posed problems. The students will need to work actively and independently at the material. However, they will be working in teams of two or three people, where collaboration between team members is encouraged. All resources will be provided for the students to successfully complete the assigned task. The posed questions will be common experiences in physics that people generally deal with every day but don't really understand the concepts behind and, in most cases, don't even know that they were issues 200 years ago. There are no prerequisites to this course, just the interest to find out about the world in which we live. 4 SH. CC: Scientific Explanations.

PHYS-108 Physics of Music

A study of the acoustics of music. Explores the fundamental scientific principles underlying the physical aspects of music-what music is, how music is produced, how we hear it and how it is transmitted to a listener. Prerequisites: Familiarity with basic music terminology, music performance experience, a fascination with music or instructor's permission. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. CC: Scientific Explanations.

PHYS-202 Introductory Physics I (Algebra-based)

Introduces the macroscopic phenomena of the physical universe. Applies concepts of force, work, energy and momentum to waves, fluids and thermodynamics. Laboratory stresses methods of acquiring data, computer data processing and analyzing the causes of errors. Uses high school algebra and trigonometry as the language. 4 SH. CC: Scientific Explanations.

PHYS-203 Introductory Physics I (Calculus-based)

Introduces the macroscopic phenomena of the physical universe. Applies concepts of force, work, energy and momentum to waves, fluids and thermodynamics. Laboratory stresses methods of acquiring data, computer data processing and analyzing the causes of errors. Uses algebra, trigonometry and calculus as the language. Prequisite: MATH-111 recommended but not required. 4 SH. CC: Scientific Explanations.

PHYS-204 Introductory Physics I (Calculus-based)

Introduces the macroscopic phenomena of the physical universe. Applies concepts of force, work, energy and momentum to waves, fluids and thermodynamics. Laboratory stresses methods of acquiring data, computer data processing and analyzing the causes of errors. Prerequisite: MATH-111 recommended but not required. 4 SH. 5 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. CC: Scientific Explanations, Team Intensive.

PHYS-205 Introductory Physics II (Algebra-based)

Continuation of Introductory Physics I. Introduces and applies the concept of a field to gravitation, electricity, magnetism, circuits, optics and the atom. Laboratory stresses electronic data acquisition and independent discovery of physical principles. Prerequisites: Introductory Physics I (PHYS-202, -203 or -204) and MATH-111 (recommended but not required). 4 SH. 5 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS-206 Introductory Physics II (Calculus-based)

Continuation of Introductory Physics I. Introduces and applies the concept of a field to gravitation, electricity, magnetism, circuits, optics and the atom. Laboratory stresses electronic data acquisition and independent discovery of physical principles. Uses algebra, trigonometry and calculus as the language. Prerequisites: Introductory Physics I (PHYS-202, -203, or -204), and MATH-111. 4 SH.

PHYS-301 Newtonian Mechanics

Studies particle and rigid body motion in two and three dimensions. Uses vectors and differential equations. Introduces Lagrangian and Hamiltonian approaches to mechanics. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS-302 Electric and Magnetic Fields

Studies the concepts of fields. Uses mathematics of multivariable functions and vectors. Covers Maxwell's equations and their use in describing electric and magnetic waves. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS-303 Solid State Physics

Introduces the physics of crystalline materials. Discusses lattice dynamics, electron behavior in metals, semiconductors, and dielectric and magnetic properties. Laboratory builds on concepts introduced in analog electronics. Studies computer-to-instrument interfacing, emphasizing signal processing, measurement and control of external processing. Prerequisites: PHYS-101 and Introductory Physics II (PHYS-205 or PHYS-206). 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS-304 Classical and Modern Optics

Geometrical optics, including reflection, refraction, thick and thin lenses, stops, mirrors, aberrations, and ray tracing. Covers physical optics, including interference, diffraction, polarization and optical activity. Discusses quantum optics as they apply to lasers, holography and magneto/electro-optics. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS-305 Topics in Physics

Selected topics not covered in other courses. May include statistical mechanics, nuclear physics, heat and thermodynamics, material science, and planetary astronomy. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS-306 Modern Physics

This course serves as an introduction to the physics discovered near the beginning of the 20th century and beyond. Topics include special relativity, the wave nature of matter, the particle nature of light, the Bohr atom, non-relativistic quantum mechanics, the hydrogen atom, molecular structure, nuclear structure and nuclear applications. Additional topics may be covered depending on professor/student interests. A number of seminal experiments are performed and studied, which aids in putting the introduced ideas into both scientific and historical context. Prerequisites: MATH-112 and Introductory Physics II (PHYS-205 or PHYS-206). 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours. CC: Oral Intensive, Writing Intensive.

PHYS-401 Electromagnetic and Mechanical Waves

Optical, mechanical and electromagnetic wave phenomena in one, two and three dimensions. Covers free space, fluids and solids. Begins with Maxwell's equations. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS-402 Quantum Mechanics

Covers history of quantum mechanics leading to the Bohr Atom. Also focuses on mathematical treatment of quantum mechanics fundamentals. Includes Schrodinger formulation, approximation methods, symmetry and angular momentum. Covers applications to simple atoms and molecules. 2 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS-404 Thermodynamics and Statistical Methods

This course covers the laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic functions, heat engines, kinetic theory, and the statistical mechanics of classical and quantum-mechanical systems. Prerequisites: Introductory Physics I, Introductory Physics II and PHYS-306. 4 SH. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours.

PHYS-500 Independent Study

In-depth focus on a selected topic of student interest. Variable semester hours.

PHYS-530 Physics Internship

Work for government agency or industry under supervision of a physicist or engineer. Variable semester hours.

PHYS-550 Physics Research

Individual or group research in experimental or theoretical physics under the direction of a principal investigator. Prerequisites: Permission of adviser and principal investigator. To meet the capstone requirement, a minimum of two semester hours is required. Variable semester hours. Capstone.