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English Literature

The English Major - Literature is designed to prepare students for a successful, fulfilling life and career in the 21st century by training them to understand the theoretical implications and historical context of all forms of writing and become expert writers. A graduate from this program will have superb analytic and problem-solving skills, powerful methods to understand cultural context and meaning, and the ability to perform advanced research in any text-based field, such as law, education, government, library science, publishing, editing, marketing and public advocacy.

Requirements for the English Major - Literature. 40 - 42 semester hours with grades of C- or better.

Semester Hours View Full Course Catalog >>
4 ENGL-240 Literary Themes

4        One course chosen from among ENGL-245 Studies in Comparative Literatures of the Americas, ENGL-250 World Literature, ENGL-255 Jewish Literature, and ENGL-240 Literary Themes.  Students cannot repeat a course with the same content.

4 ENGL-265 Forms of Writing
4 ENGL-290 Aesthetics and Interpretation

4         Mid-level writing course chosen from among ENGL-295 Voice and Audience, WRIT-240 Introduction to Genre Writing, WRIT-250 Introduction to Creative Writing, WRIT-251 Introduction to Fiction, WRIT-252 Introduction to Poetry, and WRIT-253 Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

16       Advanced study to be chosen from among courses in the ENGL-300 to ENGL-390 range. 4 semester hours of this work must be in an early period course.

2-4     ENGL-540 Internship in field related to likely career

2 ENGL-440 Independent Research: Issues in Literature

Of the semester hours listed above, 4 semester hours taken at the 200 or 300 level must be early period, defined as pre-1865 America or pre-1789 British. 4 semester hours taken at either the 200 or 300 level must be multicultural/non-western.

Minor in English. English minors complete, with grades of C- or better, four semester hours from ENGL-265 Forms of Writing courses, four semester hours from Surveys in Traditions of Literatures courses and 12 semester hours from Advanced Studies and Themes courses. Courses are chosen by the student with the guidance of a departmental adviser.

English

ENGL-090 College Writing

An intensive introduction to college reading and writing, intended to prepare students for the challenge of college writing and to empower them to become members of a larger writing community. Sections limited to 18 students. For elective credit only; not for credit in the English major or minor or the Central Curriculum. 4 SH.

ENGL-100 Writing and Thinking

An introduction to college writing, reading and discourse. Active discussion among students and instructors in sections limited to 18 participants. Seminars typically focus on a current social problem or a topic of particular interest to the instructor. Not for credit in the major or minor. 4 SH. CC: Writing and Thinking.

ENGL-190 Introduction to Modern Publishing

An introduction to the history of modern publishing, to the art and business of producing books (including current trends and problems), and to the practical knowledge and critical skills needed to pursue employment in the industry. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 4 SH. CC: Interdisciplinary.

ENGL-205 Literature Studies

Specialized courses surveying a particular theme or topic of literary study and fostering in students the capacity for critical thinking. Texts are chosen according to the interest and expertise of instructors. Recent examples are Wilderness Literature, Beat Literature, Living Writers and Travel Literature. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or second-semester first-year students who have successfully completed the Writing and Thinking course. 4 SH. CC: Literary Expression.

ENGL-240 Literary Themes

An introductory historical survey of prominent themes in literature, including those related to national, transnational and ethnic literatures. Course topics vary and may include coming of age, human-nature relations, war and revolution, technology, and publishing house culture. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or second-semester first-year students who have successfully completed ENGL-100. 4 SH. CC: Literary Expression.

ENGL-245 Studies in Comparative Literatures of the Americas (Multicultural/Non-Western)

Surveys the literature of one or more cultural groups both within and outside the U.S., including African-American, Native American, Latina/Latino, Asian American and others. In every case, factors of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and class will be of prime concern. Course selections and course topics vary according to instructor preference. Prerequisite: English and creative writing major or sophomore standing. Satisfies Multicultural/Non-Western requirement. 4 SH. CC: Diversity, Literary Expression.

ENGL-250 World Literature (Multicultural/Non-Western)

Surveys the literature, primarily in translation, of both historical and contemporary world writers, emphasizing the global context of literature. Prerequisite: English and creative writing major or sophomore standing. Satisfies Multicultural/Non-Western requirement. 4 SH. CC: Literary Expression.

ENGL-255 Jewish Literature (Multicultural/Non-Western)

A variable topic survey, in English translation, of the texts, writers, histories and languages that describe Jewish literatures. The course is especially concerned with debates over definitions of "Jewish literature" (what makes Jewish literatures Jewish?), the significance of Jewish literary and cultural diversity and Jewish literary navigations between diaspora and homeland, secularism and religiosity. Readings may include Hebrew and Israeli literature, Yiddish literature, Sephardic literature, or Jewish literatures of Europe and the Americas. Same as JWST-255. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Satisfies Multicultural/Non-Western requirement. 4 SH. CC: Diversity, Literary Expression.

ENGL-265 Forms of Writing

Courses designed to examine both the formal characteristics of a particular genre and its historical development. Focus of a particular section may be the novel, the short story, drama, poetry, the essay, memoir, epic or popular writing. Prerequisite: English or creative writing major or sophomore standing. 4 SH. CC: Diversity Intensive, Literary Expression, Writing Intensive.

ENGL-269 English Grammar and the Writing Process

A descriptive study of American English grammar and the history of the English language. 2 SH. CC: Oral Intensive.

ENGL-290 Aesthetics and Interpretation

Intensive and advanced study of reading and writing about literature. Includes close analysis of literary texts in historic, generic and cultural contexts; study of research methods and writing the research paper; and attention to traditional and recent critical theory. Prerequisite: English or creative writing major or sophomore standing. 4 SH. CC: Artistic Expression, Interdisciplinary, Writing Intensive.

ENGL-295 Voice and Audience

This course introduces students to academic writing in English studies by exploring varied models of successful scholarly writing. Emphasis is placed on students developing the skills and strategies writers need in order to participate effectively in the diverse conversations that define this field. Prerequisites: ENGL-100. 4 SH. CC: Writing Intensive.

ENGL-298 Book Reviewing

An introduction to and an intensive, rigorous workshop in the basic forms of book reviewing: the short book review, the review essay and the longer literary critical essay. The course builds on the writing skills students have learned in ENGL-100 and 200-level courses in literature, and it includes intensive reading in the forms listed above. Prerequisites: ENGL-100 or the equivalent and sophomore standing or instructor's permission. 4 SH.

ENGL-299 Professional and Civic Writing: Practice and Theory

This course offers experience in theory and practice of professional writing (writing that occurs in the workplace, especially in businesses, in government and for nonprofits). While the course is required for students in the publishing and editing emphasis of the Department of English and Creative Writing, students from other majors are welcome. Students will first choose a company or organization for which they would like to write. They will then gain experience writing a wide range of genres, such as letters and memos, feature stories, interviews, biographical sketches, press kits, fliers and brochures, and proposals. We will also study the theory of professional writing, including how genres (generally seen as set formulas) evolve over time in response to changing situations, how genres engage power relations and how genres can be made more open to divergent points of view. Prerequisite: ENGL-100. 4 SH. CC: Writing Intensive.

ENGL-300 History of the English Language (Early Period)

The development of the language from its origin to the present. Includes standards of written and spoken English and the differences between English spoken in England and that spoken in various parts of America and elsewhere in the world. Partially satisfies early period requirement. 4 SH.

ENGL-305 Themes in Early British Literature (Early Period)

Readings in prose, poetry and drama from the sixth to 17th centuries. Sections may focus on a particular period or range across centuries, and topics vary according to instructor preference. The texts will be in English but will not necessarily have been composed in Great Britain. Partially satisfies early period requirement. 4 SH.

ENGL-315 Themes in Early Modern British Literature (Early Period)

Readings in prose, poetry and drama from the late 17th century to 1900. Sections may focus on a particular period or range across centuries, and topics vary according to instructor preference. The texts will be in English but will not necessarily have been composed in Great Britain. Partially satisfies early period requirement. 4 SH. CC: Writing Intensive.

ENGL-325 Themes in Modern British Literature

Readings in prose, poetry and drama from 1900 to the present. Sections may focus on a particular period or range across centuries, and topics vary according to instructor preference. The texts will be in English but will not necessarily have been composed in Great Britain. 4 SH.

ENGL-335 Themes in Early American Literature (Early Period)

Readings in prose, poetry and drama by writers representing various American cultures and literatures, from the pre-Colonial period through 1865. Sections may focus on a particular period or range across centuries, and topics vary according to instructor preference. Partially satisfies early period requirement. 4 SH. CC: Writing Intensive.

ENGL-345 Themes in Modern American Literature

Readings in prose, poetry and drama by writers representing various American cultures and literatures, from 1865 to the present. Sections may focus on a particular period or range across centuries, and topics vary according to instructor preference. Prerequisite: 8 semester hours of English course work at the 100 and 200 levels. 4 SH.

ENGL-350 Studies in Major Authors

A study of literary works by a single author or perhaps of two writers whose works may be studied in tandem. By reading a number of texts by a single author, students will come to understand individual works better and will gain insight into the author's particular vision and sense of literary craft. Offerings are likely to include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Twain, Austen, Dickinson and Morrison. 4 SH. CC: Writing Intensive. Course also counts as Team Intensive, but only when the topic is Shakespeare: Cultural Performances.

ENGL-355 Studies in Anglophone Literature (Multicultural/Non-Western)

A study of literature written originally in English by writers from countries other than the United States and Britain. The course may include writers from Canada, Ireland, the Indian subcontinent, the Caribbean and English-speaking countries in Africa. Satisfies Multicultural/Non-Western requirement. 4 SH.

ENGL-361 Studies in Literary Forms

Advanced courses designed to examine the formal characteristics of a genre, as well as the historical factors influencing its development or manifestation at any given moment, and the theoretical approaches to understanding the genre. The focus of a particular section may be the novel, short story, drama, poetry, the essay or autobiography. 4 SH.

ENGL-365 Studies in Literature and Gender

Courses exploring such topics as women in literature, literature by women, literature and sexuality, the construction of gender in literature, and feminist literary theory. Same as WMST-365. 4 SH. CC: Writing Intensive.

ENGL-375 History of the Book

In this course we will study the book as a material object, a concrete text that is produced, sold, circulated and read. More broadly, we will address the wider social and political pressures that have shaped book production, as well as the social and political consequences of producing books and other media. We will first examine manuscripts and manuscript culture through a consideration of the New Testament's publication history. We will then shift our attention to the medium of print. As a class, we will study the wider implications of the invention of the printing press. What effect, for instance, did printing have upon literacy, the rise of natural science, the transformation of religion, and the twin concepts of authorship and literary property (copyright)? How did censorship constrain what writers, printers and booksellers were able to publish? Finally, we will study the Internet as an engine of change. In many scholars' estimation the Internet will have a more profound impact upon society than did the printing press. We will try to gauge this impact and to appraise the ways in which hypertext is changing literature, journalism and what's more, how we read and write. 4 SH.

ENGL-381 Advanced Composition: Rhetoric and the Environment

An interdisciplinary workshop course focusing on the environment. Students explore the way scientists' knowledge, methods and values have informed public rhetoric and scholarly rhetorical criticism, as well as the ways that rhetorical criticism and awareness have in turn had an impact on scientific discourse. Fundamental to the course is the crafting of students' written arguments in response to readings and personal involvement with environmental issues. The process of writing these arguments is informed by research from the field of composition and models the best practices of that field, making this course useful for future teachers and professional writers, as well as to those who are interested in environmental issues. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 4 SH. CC: Interdisciplinary, Writing Intensive.

ENGL-382 Reading/Writing/Teaching Difference

Students explore the ways that difference impacts everyone's—students', instructors' and others'—experiences of reading, writing and teaching/learning. "Difference" includes, among other factors, gender, race, class, religion, ability, sexuality and national origin. This interdisciplinary course uses readings and concepts from the fields of education, literature, and composition and rhetoric. Students will apply these concepts and readings to their own or to others' reading, writing and learning experiences inside and/or outside of the traditional classroom. Prerequisites: ENGL-100 and sophomore standing or instructor's permission. 4 SH. CC: Interdisciplinary, Diversity Intensive.

ENGL-388 Publishing: Ethics, Entertainment, Art, Politics

This course explores the cultural, political and commercial functions of publishing. We explore how published texts ask us to take on certain ethical roles as art critics, citizens and consumers. We start by reading Addison and Steele's Spectator; next we examine Jurgen Haberma's theory that newspapers' publication of literary criticism helped enable democratic government; finally, we consider the ways changes in marketing, new formats like the Internet and increases in profitability have obscured the political purposes that may have been served in publishing. 4 SH. Capstone. CC: Ethics Intensive, Writing Intensive.

ENGL-390 Special Themes and Topics

Occasional offerings of specialized courses exploring subjects of serious interest to faculty members and to students. 4 SH. CC: Writing Intensive. When the topic being offered is Race and Identity in U.S. Literature, the course is Diversity Intensive and Ethics Intensive but not Writing Intensive.

ENGL-440 Independent Research: Issues in Literature

The majority of this course is a research workshop that allows seniors to pursue individual interests in a serious, scholarly way. It is the capstone course of the English and English-secondary education majors. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and at least eight hours at the 200 level or above. 2 SH. Capstone. CC: Oral Intensive, Writing Intensive.

ENGL-500 Directed Reading and Research

Independent research and writing under the supervision of an appropriate member of the department. Prerequisites: 24 credit hours in ENGL 200- and 300-level courses, 48 total credit hours with at least a 3.00 GPA in the major and department approval. 2-4 SH.

ENGL-505 Independent Study

Independent research and writing under the supervision of an appropriate member of the department. Prerequisites: 24 credit hours in ENGL 200- and 300-level courses, 48 total credit hours with at least a 3.00 GPA in the major and department approval. 2-4 SH.

ENGL-520 Practicum

Applied projects in language, literature or craft, including supervised work in literacy projects, in writing projects, at public and school libraries, in shelters, and in public institutions. The Susquehanna University Office of Volunteer Programs provides contacts. May apply for major or minor credit to a maximum of four semester hours, depending on the nature of the project. Prerequisites: 24 credit hours in ENGL 200- and 300-level courses, 48 total credit hours with at least a 3.00 GPA in the major and department approval. S/U grade. 2-4 SH.

ENGL-540 Internship

Research, writing and editing for various public and private organizations and various on- and off-campus publications. Open only when positions are available. May apply for major or minor credit to a maximum of four semester hours, depending on the nature of the internship. Prerequisites: 24 credit hours in ENGL 200- and 300-level courses, 48 total credit hours with at least a 3.00 GPA in the major and department approval. 2-4 SH.

Creative Writing

WRIT-240 Introduction to Genre Writing

This workshop writing course introduces students to the craft of various types of writing, including screenwriting, children's literature and science fiction. Genres vary depending on semester and instructor expertise. 4 SH. CC: Artistic Expression when the topic is Experimental Writing.

WRIT-241 Environmental Writing

In this hands-on course students will develop creative writing projects around specific, local, environmentally important/precarious sites. In doing so, students will perform both traditional academic (scientific/historical) and experiential (place-based/creative) research that evolves into works of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, or cross-genre work.  In this course you will dwell in the space between and including environmental studies and creative writing, developing your own voice and vision as witness to environmental change and trauma. 4 SH.

WRIT-250 Introduction to Creative Writing

Introductory workshop course in the study and practice of genre topics other than fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. 4 SH. CC: Team Intensive, Writing Intensive. May be repeated as long as the topic changes.

WRIT-251 Introduction to Fiction

Introductory workshop course in the study and practice of fiction. 4 SH. CC: Team Intensive, Writing Intensive.

WRIT-252 Introduction to Poetry

Introductory workshop course in the study and practice of poetry. 4 SH. CC: Team Intensive, Writing Intensive.

WRIT-253 Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

Introductory workshop course in the study and practice of creative nonfiction. 4 SH. CC: Team Intensive, Writing Intensive.

WRIT-270 Small Press Publishing and Editing

An introductory workshop course in the study and practice of publishing and editing for small presses; includes both historical study of the industry and hands-on publishing and editing projects. 4 SH. CC: Artistic Expression.

WRIT-350 Intermediate Creative Writing

An intensive, rigorous discussion of student writing in a workshop atmosphere. This course builds upon what students learned in WRIT-250 Introduction to Creative Writing. It includes intensive reading of literature in the genre being studied. Special emphasis on the development of a body of work. Genre topics include all those other than fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Prerequisite: WRIT-250 or instructor's permission. 4 SH. CC: Literary Expression, Team Intensive, Writing Intensive. May be repeated as long as the topic changes.

WRIT-351 Intermediate Fiction

An intensive, rigorous discussion of student writing in a workshop atmosphere. This course builds upon what students learned in WRIT-250 Introduction to Fiction. It includes intensive reading of fiction. Special emphasis on the development of a body of work.  Prerequisite: WRIT-251 or instructor's permission. 4 SH. CC: Literary Expression, Team Intensive, Writing Intensive. May be repeated as long as the topic changes.

WRIT-352 Intermediate Poetry

An intensive, rigorous discussion of student writing in a workshop atmosphere. This course builds upon what students learned in WRIT-250 Introduction to Poetry. It includes intensive reading of poetry. Special emphasis on the development of a body of work.  Prerequisite: WRIT-252 or instructor's permission. 4 SH. CC: Literary Expression, Team Intensive, Writing Intensive. May be repeated as long as the topic changes.

WRIT-353 Intermediate Creative Nonfiction

An intensive, rigorous discussion of student writing in a workshop atmosphere. This course builds upon what students learned in WRIT-250 Introduction to Creative Nonfiction. It includes intensive reading of creative nonfiction. Special emphasis on the development of a body of work.  Prerequisite: WRIT-253 or instructor's permission. 4 SH. CC: Literary Expression, Team Intensive, Writing Intensive. May be repeated as long as the topic changes.

WRIT-450 Advanced Creative Writing

An intensive, rigorous discussion of student writing in a workshop atmosphere, along with intensive reading in the genre. Special emphasis on the development of a significant body of work in preparation for an understanding of what is required to write a book in the genre being studied. Genre topics include all those other than fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Prerequisite: WRIT-350 or instructor's permission. 4 SH. May be repeated.

WRIT-451 Advanced Fiction

An intensive, rigorous discussion of student writing in a workshop atmosphere, along with intensive reading in fiction. Special emphasis on the development of a significant body of work in preparation for an understanding of what is required to write a fiction book.  Prerequisite: WRIT-351 or instructor's permission. 4 SH. May be repeated.

WRIT-452 Advanced Poetry

An intensive, rigorous discussion of student writing in a workshop atmosphere, along with intensive reading. Special emphasis on the development of a significant body of work in preparation for an understanding of what is required to write a poetry book.  Prerequisite: WRIT-352 or instructor's permission. 4 SH. May be repeated.

WRIT-453 Advanced Creative Nonfiction

An intensive, rigorous discussion of student writing in a workshop atmosphere, along with intensive reading. Special emphasis on the development of a significant body of work in preparation for an understanding of what is required to write a creative nonfiction book.   Prerequisite: WRIT-353 or instructor's permission. 4 SH. May be repeated.

WRIT-520 Practicum

Applied projects in writing under the supervision of an appropriate member of the department. Prerequisites: 24 credit hours in WRIT 200- and 300-level courses, 48 total credit hours with at least a 3.00 GPA in the major and department approval. 2-4 SH.

WRIT-540 Internship

Research, writing and editing for various public and private organizations and various on- and off-campus publications. Open only when positions are available. 2-4 SH.

WRIT-550 Senior Writing Portfolio

The capstone course for all creative writing majors (and interested creative writing minors). Students will prepare a portfolio of their written work with the expectation of the portfolio going "public," that is, meeting the demands of graduate school, employment or the marketplace. Required for senior creative writing majors; others by successful completion of WRIT-350. 2-4 SH. Capstone. CC: Oral Intensive.

WRIT-590 Independent Writing Project

Completion of a suitable portfolio of fiction, poetry, drama or creative nonfiction. Permission of the faculty member directing the project must be obtained during preregistration. Prerequisites: 24 credit hours in WRIT 200- and 300-level courses, 48 total credit hours with at least a 3.00 GPA in the major and department approval. 2-4 SH.

The English-secondary education major is designed to prepare students to teach English in grades 7-12 and be successful on standard exams required of teaching candidates. This major is offered by the Department of English and Creative Writing in conjunction with the Department of Education. It is designed to be a program leading to teacher certification, and students formally apply to the teacher education program by February of their sophomore year or as soon after that as possible. At the time of application, the candidate must have at least a 3.00 overall GPA and a 3.00 English GPA. 

Requirements for the English-Secondary Education Major, 48 semester hours with grades of C- or better.

Coursework required by the state of Pennsylvania for admission to the teacher certification program includes successful completion of ENGL-100 Writing and Thinking or equivalent course, at least 3 semester hours in British or American Literature, at least 6 semester hours of mathematics coursework (or other courses which satisfy the Central Curriculum Analytical Thought requirement), and at least one 40-hour externship.

Education course requirements for secondary education are EDUC-101 Introduction to Education and Society, EDUC-102 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education, EDUC-250 Educational Psychology, EDUC-260 Introduction to Special Education, EDUC-270 Instruction of Exceptional Students, EDUC-330 Technology in Education, EDUC-350 English Language Learners, EDUC-380 Instructional Design, EDUC-421 Methods of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in Teaching English, EDUC-479 Principles of Learning and Teaching in Secondary Education, EDUC-483 Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management in Secondary Education, and the EDUC-500 Student Teaching Package (EDUC-501, EDUC-502, EDUC-503, and EDUC-600).  

Major GPA Calculation. For the purposes of calculating the required 2.00 minimum GPA in any of the three majors offered by the department, the English and Creative Writing Department uses all of the major courses with the ENGL and WRIT prefixes.