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Be immersed in Italian language and culture

Become a confident writer, reader, listener and speaker in Italian—but don't stop there. We take a content-based approach to learning language at Susquehanna.

So you'll take classes on the Italian economy or Mafia in Italian literature—taught entirely in Italian. You'll learn how Italy has influenced art, religion and culture for centuries.

With our small classes and low student-to-teacher ratio, you'll get plenty of one-on-one attention as you work toward fluency.

You'll also develop the critical thinking abilities, cultural competence, and communication and people skills that employers seek.

We strive to create an Italian-speaking community in and out of the classroom. Chat with fellow students and an Italian Fulbright fellow at weekly language tables, enjoy dinner at an Italian restaurant with your class, or catch an Italian movie with our Italian Club.

Spend a semester in Italy

We're one of the only universities that requires semester-long study abroad for language majors.

Connect with native speakers in study abroad programs in Siena, Ferrara and other Italian cities. You'll live with host families, make long-lasting friendships, do internships and take courses in a broad array of disciplines.

You'll bring back firsthand knowledge of Italian culture and a grasp of the language only achieved through immersion.

A host of possibilities

Italy is one of the world's top economies, the fifth most-visited nation and home to the highest number of UN world heritage sites.

Mastering Italian will increase your marketability in fields in which Italy is a world economic leader, including the culinary arts, fashion, tourism, art and more.

Combining Italian with another major or minor can make you more competitive when pursuing careers in business, the arts, education, politics, government, publishing, research, and many others. 

Recent graduates have gone to graduate school at:

Columbia University
George Washington University
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania State University
Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
University of Kentucky
University of Maryland
Villanova University
Fellowships
Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange for Young Professionals
Fulbright Scholars Program

Recent graduates are employed at:

Bayer AG
Billings Bilingual LLC
Congressional Quarterly Inc.
Corporation for National & Community Service (AmeriCorps)
Moravian Academy
Teach for America
United Nations
Villanova Theatre at Villanova University
Walnut Street Theater, Philadelphia

Modern Language Major. Students with a major in French, German, Italian or Spanish complete at least 28 semester hours above the 201 level with grades of C- or better. Students placed at the 300 level complete 24 semester hours at the 300 and 400 levels with grades of C- or better. At least one course in the target language must be at the 400 level. The Independent Study (542) in all languages may also be counted toward the major and minor. French, Italian and German require one related history course. Spanish requires one course in Latin American history. All majors complete the capstone, which is composed of two elements: (1) a 400-level course in the language of study to be taken after completing a semester abroad, typically during senior year; and (2) a language proficiency evaluation (FRNC-599, GERM-599, ITAL-599, SPAN-599), which they must pass in their final semester. This second part of the capstone is evaluated on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

All of the modern language majors require one semester of study abroad in a country where the language of study is spoken. Most students majoring in a language also have a second major. Almost any other major on campus can be combined with language studies. After returning from a year or semester of study abroad, majors must take at least one regularly scheduled 300- or 400-level language course at Susquehanna before graduating.

For a major in French, students complete FRNC-202, FRNC-301 and FRNC-302, one course in French or European history, a semester abroad in a French-speaking country; and the capstone, which is composed of two elements: (1) a 400-level course typically taken during the senior year and (2) a language proficiency evaluation in their final semster. 

For a major in German,  students complete GERM-202 and 24 semester hours at the 300- and 400-level; one course in European history; a semester abroad in a German-speaking country; and the capstone, which is composed of two elements; (1) a 400-level course typically taken during the senior year and (2) a language proficiency evaluation in their final semester. 

For a major in Italian, students complete ITAL-202 and 24 semester hours at the 300- and 400-level; one course in European history; a semester abroad in Italy; and the capstone, which is composed of two elements; (1) a 400-level course typically taken during the senior year and (2) a language proficiency evaluation in their final semester.

For a major in Spanish, students complete SPAN-202, SPAN-301, SPAN-302; a course in Latin American history; a semester abroad in a Spanish-speaking country; and the capstone, which is composed of two elements: (1) a 400-level course typically taken during the senior year and (2) a language proficiency evaluation in their final semester. Finally, majors complete one course in each of the three geographical areas where Spanish is most widely spoken; Spain, Spanish America and the United States.  

Minor in French, German, Italian or Spanish. Students minoring in French, German, Italian or Spanish complete, with grades of C- or better, 16 semester hours above 201. Students placed at the 300 level complete 12 semester hours at the 300 level with grades of C- or better.

Teaching Certification. Susquehanna offers teaching certification in French, German, and Spanish, and students preparing for such certification must maintain a minimum 3.00 GPA in the major.  Coursework required by the state of Pennsylvania for admission to the teacher certification program includes successful completion of ENGL-100 Writing and Thinking or equivalent course, at least 3 semester hours in British or American literature, at least 6 semester hours of mathematics coursework (or other courses which satisfy the Central Curriculum Analytical Thought requirement), and at least one 40-hour externship.

Education course requirements for secondary education are EDUC-101 Introduction to Education and Society, EDUC-102 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education, EDUC-250 Educational Psychology, EDUC-260 Introduction to Special Education, EDUC-270 Instruction of Exceptional Students, EDUC-330 Technology in Education, EDUC-350 English Language Learners, EDUC-380 Instructional Design, EDUC-422 Methods of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in Teaching Foreign Languages, EDUC-479 Principles of Learning and Teaching in Secondary Education, EDUC-483 Differentiated Instruction and Classroom Management in Secondary Education, and the EDUC-500 Student Teaching package (EDUC-501, EDUC-502, EDUC-503, and EDUC-600). In addition, students pursuing certification in French and German satisfy all of the usual requirements for those majors.

Amanda S. Meixell, Ph.D.

Department: Modern Languages
Associate Professor of Spanish

Emailmeixell@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4258

Wanda L. Cordero-Ponce, Ph.D.

Department: Modern Languages
Associate Professor of Spanish

Emailcorderop@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4265

Martina Kolb, Ph.D.

Department: Modern Languages
Associate Professor of German

Emailkolb@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4712

Lynn E. Palermo, Ph.D.

Department: Modern Languages
Associate Professor of French

Emailpalermo@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4257

Daryl M. Rodgers, Ph.D.

Department: Modern Languages
Associate Professor of Italian

Emailrodgers@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4693

Megan L. Kelly, Ph.D.

Department: Modern Languages
Assistant Professor of Spanish

Emailkellym@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4267

Kimberly West

Department: Modern Languages
Lecturer Spanish

Emailwestkg@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4253

Li E

Department: Modern Languages
Assistant Professor of Chinese

Emaileli@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4603

Cherry Lai Bearer

Department: Modern Languages
Adjunct Faculty in Chinese

Emailbearer@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4714

Dena Isleem

Department: Modern Languages
Adjunct Faculty in Arabic

Emailisleem@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4176

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Study Abroad Opportunities for Italian Majors

Ferrara

Get to know the real Italy while taking a broad range of courses including food science and Italian cinema in this Renaissance town.

Sant’Anna Institute, Sorrento

Take a variety of courses including archeology, art history, and volcanology in an impressive historic structure perched on the cliffs of the Amalfi coast.

Siena Italian Studies

With service-learning and internship opportunities as well as homestays, you'll get a full-immersion experience surrounded by the beautiful Tuscan countryside.

Santa Reparata International School of Art

Drawing, history of painting or fabric design are features of this program in Florence.

Perugia

An optional Italian immersion program combined with trips to Rome, Assissi and La Verna.

Rome

Study architecture, anthropology and Italian politics in the City of Seven Hills.

The Mafia In Italian Literature, Film & Culture

In Italian 310/460, we will look at the origins of the Mafia (and organized crime) in Italy. We will discuss how it has permeated Italian culture (in particular literature and film), and analyze some of the myths that still surround the Mafia in both Italy and abroad

Italian

Contact Us

Department of Modern Language

514 University Ave.
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870

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Location

Bogar Hall

Campus Map

Phone & Email

Amanda Meixell, department head
570-372-4258
meixell@susqu.edu

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