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You care about the environment—so do we

Making a difference in the environment requires more than just scientific knowledge. Environmental problems involve law, ethics, public policy, communication and business.

At Susquehanna, you'll develop a holistic, applied approach to solving environmental challenges. You'll understand the science behind climate change, learn about environmental laws and regulations, and study energy resources.

You also have the freedom to pursue relevant courses in other areas, such as:

  • A biology class in sustainable food systems
  • An English class in Green Romanticism 
  • A management class in values and ethics
  • A public relations course in crisis management
  • A sociology class on social justice

The nearby Susquehanna River confluence and the abundant waterways, wetlands, forests and farmland that surround us offer a diverse and research-rich environment.

And, our 87-acre environmental field station and Freshwater Research Institute are right on campus.

Interested in sustainable living? There are plenty of opportunities to make a difference—work at our campus garden, live in our Sustainability House, or join a student group like S.A.V.E. or the Beekeepers Club.

Jobs that make a difference

Land a job that helps the planet. You'll be ready for a career in environmental law, environmental policy, or environmental advocacy at a nonprofit—jobs that will make good use of your broad-based knowledge and passion.

We're connected to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection—organizations that work on environmental issues. These relationships result in meaningful research and internship opportunities, and jobs for our graduates.

Students in this new major find jobs at:

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay
Weis Markets

Environmental Studies Major. To earn the B.A. in environmental studies students must complete 56 semester hours of coursework, all with grades of C- or higher. All majors must complete 44 semester hours of program foundation courses and 12 semester hours of electives.

Double-counting restriction: students in the Environmental Studies major may double-count a maximum of 16 semester hours toward another major or minor.

Semester Hours View Full Course Catalog >>

44        Foundation

4          EENV-101 Environmental Science or ECOL-100 Introduction to the Science of Ecology or BIOL-101 Ecology and Evolution or BIOL-010 Issues in Biology when the topic is one of the following: Biology of Climate Change, Conservation Biology, Environmental Biology, or Human Ecology

4 EENV-105 Energy and the Environment
or EENV-332 Sustainable Energy Resources
4 EENV-242 Climate and Global Change
4 ENST-335 Environmental Laws and Regulations

4          WRIT-241 Environmental Writing or ENGL-381 Rhetoric and the Environment or ENGL-205 Literature Studies when the topic is Literature of Climate Change

4 RELI-235 Environmental Ethics
4 POLI-212 Introduction to Public Policy
4 ECON-202 Principles of Microeconomics
or ECON-105 Elements of Economics
4 ACCT-210 Legal Environment
4 ENST-301 Current Topics in Environmental Studies
4 ENST-500 Negotiating International Climate Treaties: Institutions, Law, Theory

Electives (12 semester hours)

Students must complete 12 semester hours forming a cohesive focus, with advisor approval.  No more than 4 semester hours may be taken at the 100 level or lower, and at least 4 semester hours must be taken at the 300 level or higher.  It is not necessary for students to complete all 12 semester hours from the same category.

Biology/Ecology/Earth Sciences

2          BIOL-560 Interdisciplinary Explorations in Biology when the topic is either Sustainable Food Systems or Biology of Invasive Species

4          ECOL-201 Community and Ecosystems Ecology

4          ECOL-408 Aquatic Ecology and ECOL-409 Aquatic Ecology Lab

4 EENV-213 Oceanography
4 EENV-220 Water Resources
4 EENV-360 Geographic Information Systems
4 EENV-383 Soil Science

Cultural Studies

4          ENGL-205 Literature Studies when the topic is Literature of Climate Change (if not taken for Foundation credit)

4          ENGL-295 Voice and Audience

4          ENGL-315 Themes in Early Modern British Literature, when the topic is Green Romanticism

4          ENGL-381 Rhetoric and the Environment (if not taken for Foundation credit)

4          WRIT-241 Environmental Writing (if not taken for Foundation credit)

4 HIST-324 Pennsylvania's Pasts and Their Publics
4 PHIL-150 Everyday Ethics: Philosophical Issues in the Private Realm
4 RELI-101 Introduction to Religious Studies
4 RELI-105 World Religions

Economics/Business

4 ECON-201 Principles of Macroeconomics
4 ECON-313 Intermediate Microeconomics Theory
4 ECON-338 International Political Economy
4 ECON-370 Game Theory
4 MKTG-280 Marketing
4 MGMT-333 New Ventures: Start-Up to Exit
4 MGMT-369 Values, Ethics and the Good Life

Political Science

4 POLI-111 American Government and Politics
4 POLI-121 Comparative Government and Politics
4 POLI-215 Law and Politics
4 POLI-317 The U. S. Congress
4 POLI-319 State and Local Government and Politics
4 POLI-333 Development, Globalization and Society
4 POLI-334 International Organizations and Law

Public Relation

4 COMM-192 Public Speaking
4 COMM-211 Public Relations
4 COMM-321 Crisis Management

Sociology/Anthropology/Psychology

4 ANTH-152 Public Culture
4 ANTH-162 Introduction to Anthropology
4 ANTH-311 Regulating Bodies: Food, Sex, Drugs and the Economy
4 PSYC-232 Environmental Psychology
4 SOCI-101 Principles of Sociology
4 SOCI-333 Development, Globalization and Society
4 SOCI-316 Social Justice
4 SOCI-410 Economic Sociology

Minor in Environmental Studies. Environmental studies is an interdisciplinary program that allows students to study environmental problems from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Drawing on courses from the departments of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Political Science, English and Creative Writing, Economics, Religious Studies, Sociology and Anthropology, and others, students develop a holistic, applied approach to environmental problem solving.

The minor in environmental studies requires 24 semester hours. Only courses completed with a grade of C- or higher may be counted toward the minor.  No more than 8 semester hours may be taken at the 100-level or lower.

Double-counting restriction for interdisciplinary minors: only 8 semester hours of this minor may be double-counted toward the student's major or another minor.

Courses applied to the environmental studies minor must include the following (see below for detailed lists):

  1. Introductory (100-level) environmental science, biology, or ecology (4 SH)
  2. Upper-level (200-level or higher) environmental science, biology, or ecology (4 SH)
  3. Political science, law, or economics (4 SH)
  4. English, philosophy, religious studies, sociology/anthropology, or creative writing (4 SH)
  5. Any course from the Foundation or Electives list (4 SH)
  6. ENST-301 Current Topics in Environmental Studies (4 SH)

Semester Hours View Full Course Catalog >>

1. Introductory (100-level) environmental science, biology, or ecology courses:

EENV-101 Environmental Science (SE)

EENV-105 Energy and the Environment (SE)

ECOL-100 Introduction to the Science of Ecology (SE)

BIOL-101 Ecology and Evolution or BIOL-010 Issues in Biology (Biology of Climate Change, Conservation Biology, Environmental Biology, or Human Ecology only) (SE)

2. Upper-level (200-level or higher) environmental science, biology, or ecology courses:

EENV-213 Oceanography
EENV-220 Water Resources
EENV-242 Climate and Global Change
EENV-332 Sustainable Energy Resources
EENV-383 Soil Science
BIOL-560 Sustainable Food Systems
BIOL-560 Biology of Invasive Species
ECOL-201 Community and Ecosystems Ecology
ECOL-408 Aquatic Ecology and ECOL-409 Aquatic Ecology Laboratory

3. Political science, law, or economics courses:

POLI-212 Introduction to Public Policy
POLI-215 Law and Politics
POLI-317 The U. S. Congress
POLI-319 State and Local Government and Politics
POLI-333 Development, Globalization and Society
POLI-334 International Organizations and Law
PPOL-352 Environmental Policy
ENST-335 Environmental Laws and Regulations
ECON-313 Intermediate Microeconomics Theory
ECON-338 International Political Economy

4. English, philosophy, religious studies, sociology/anthropology, or creative writing courses:

ENGL-205 Literature of Climate Change
ENGL-205 Shakespeare and the Environment
ENGL-315 Green Romanticism
ENGL-381 Advanced Composition: Rhetoric and the Environment
RELI-235 Environmental Ethics
ANTH-152 Public Culture
ANTH-311 Regulating Bodies: Food, Sex, Drugs and the Economy
SOCI-316 Social Justice
SOCI-410 Economic Sociology
WRIT-241 Environmental Writing

5. Any additional course from any of the above 4 categories or the following:

ACCT-210 Legal Environment
EENV-360 Geographic Information Systems
MGMT-290 Non Profit Management
MGMT-404 Global Business Ethics
MKTG-486 International Marketing for Sustainability
MGMT-437 Sustainable Entrepreneurship
PSYC-232 Environmental Psychology

6. ENST-301 Current Topics in Environmental Studies

Kathy Straub, Ph.D.

Department: Earth & Environmental Sciences
Professor Earth & Environmental Science

Emailstraubk@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4318

Mark A. Heuer, Ph.D.

Department: Management
Associate Professor of Management

Emailheuer@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4448

Nicholas J. Clark, Ph.D.

Department: Political Science
Assistant Professor of Political Science

Emailclarkn@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4726

Thomas W. Martin, D.Phil.

Department: Religious Studies
Associate Professor of Religious Studies

Emailmartintw@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4166

Shari Jacobson, Ph.D.

Department: Sociology/Anthropology
Associate Professor of Anthropology

Emailjacobson@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4754

Drew Hubbell, Ph.D.

Department: English & Creative Writing
Associate Professor of English

Emailhubbell@susqu.edu
Phone570-372-4203

Help Make The Susquehanna River Cleaner

Many of our students are involved with the Freshwater Research Initiative, which includes a dedicated laboratory and state-of-the-art equipment for river research.

Ecology
Ecology

Which Environmental Science Is Right for Me?

Earth and environmental sciences, environmental studies, ecology ... they sound remarkably similar. How do you decide which one is right for you? Here's your cheat sheet on these three fields.

  • Earth and environmental sciences studies the nonliving components of our environment and how they impact living things. Think of it as the study of water, rocks, air and soil.
  • Ecology examines the intersections between all living things and the nonliving environment. Unlike earth and environmental sciences, the primary focus is living organisms.
  • Environmental studies is the major for you if you want to advocate for the environment or work for a nonprofit or non-governmental organization (NGO). This program incorporates science, law and policy to look at pressing environmental issues.

Contact Us

Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences

514 University Ave.
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870

Get Directions

Location

Natural Sciences Center

Campus Map

Phone & Email

Kathy Straub, department head
570-372-4318
straubk@susqu.edu

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