Main Navigation
Skip To Content
Home
Search
Academics
Outcomes
Admission & Aid
Discover Susquehanna
Campus Life
Division of Student Life
About SU
Support Susquehanna

The Susquehanna University Student Handbook is published by the Division of Student Life as the University’s official notification of regulations that concern student life at Susquehanna. Students are subject to the rules and regulations contained in the Handbook. Susquehanna makes every effort to provide accurate, current, and comprehensive information in this Handbook. The University reserves the right to change the rules governing admission, tuition, fees, courses, the granting of degrees, or any other regulations affecting its students. The Division of Student Life website contains the most current version of the Student Handbook.

Select a section

 

 

III. ADDITIONAL POLICIES

Sexual Misconduct & Gender-Based Violence Policy

Warning: Please note that this Policy addresses issues of Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence and uses descriptions and examples of this conduct which can be triggering.

I. Introduction

Susquehanna University prohibits all forms of sex/gender-based harassment, sexual violence, sexual exploitation, gender-based/relationship violence (dating violence or domestic violence), and stalking. Collectively, these terms are referred to in this Policy as “Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence.” Such conduct violates the mission and values of our university and disrupts the living, learning, and working environment for members of our campus community. We are committed to providing our community with an educational journey that is safe and free from all forms of Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence. These standards apply equally to all community members regardless of actual/perceived sex, gender, sexuality, gender identity and/or gender expression.

Our community expects that all interpersonal relationships and interactions, especially those of an intimate nature, will be grounded in mutual respect, open communication and clear consent. When learning of conduct or behavior that may not meet these standards, employees of our community are expected, as responsible employees, to take an active role in upholding this Policy and promoting the dignity of all individuals. We will work diligently to implement a response to all forms of Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence that is respectful, caring and just. We take our role seriously to maintain a fair compliance process, deliver effective training, facilitate educational programs and provide appropriate support resources.

II. Jurisdiction

This Policy applies to all acts of Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence committed by or against University students, employees (including faculty and staff), or third parties regardless of the individual’s actual/perceived sex, gender, sexuality, gender identity and/or gender expression whenever the act occurs on University premises or non-premises property owned or controlled by the University. This Policy also applies to off-campus conduct that adversely affects the University community and/or the pursuit of its objectives.

III. To Whom this Policy Applies

This Policy applies to conduct of all full-time, part-time, and/or temporary employees, students, or third-parties regardless of actual/perceived sex, gender, sexuality, gender identity and/or gender expression. It also serves as a resource for any interested party to report an act of Sexual Misconduct or Gender Based Violence as defined in the Policy.

IV. Prohibited Conduct

The University prohibits the conduct defined below. An attempt to commit any act defined below, as well as assisting or willfully encouraging any such act, is also considered a violation of this Policy. One act may violate one or more parts of this Policy. Community members may also be held responsible for the misconduct of their visitors and guests.

The University reserves the right to address behavior regardless of whether the conduct also violates federal, state and/or municipal civil or criminal law. Pennsylvania state law definitions can be found in Appendix A.

Sexual Harassment: Unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature, including but not limited to unwelcome sexual advances; requests for sexual favors; or other verbal, physical or visual behaviors of a sexual nature where (1) submission to or rejection of such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a condition of an individual’s employment or academic standing or is used as the basis for employment decisions or for academic evaluation, grades, or advancement (quid pro quo); or (2) such conduct has the purpose or effect of creating a hostile environment (defined below). This Policy shall not be construed or applied to restrict academic freedom at the University, nor shall it be construed to restrict constitutionally protected expression, even though such expression may be offensive, unpleasant, or even hateful.

A Hostile Environment exists when sexual harassment is sufficiently serious to deny or limit an individual’s ability to participate in or benefit from the University’s programs or activities. A hostile environment can be created by anyone involved in a University’s program or activity.

In determining whether sexual harassment has created a hostile environment, the University considers the conduct in question from both a subjective and objective perspective. It will be necessary, but not enough, that the conduct was unwelcome by the individual who was harassed, but the University will also need to find that a reasonable person in the individual’s position would have perceived the conduct as undesirable or offensive in order for that conduct to create or contribute to a hostile environment.

To make the ultimate determination of whether a hostile environment exists for an individual(s), the University considers a variety of factors related to the severity, persistence, or pervasiveness of the sex/gender-based harassment, including: (1) the type, frequency, and duration of the harassment (2) the identity and relationships of persons involved; (3) the number of individuals involved; (4) the location of the conduct and the context in which it occurred; and, (5) the degree to which the conduct affected the individual’s education or employment.

The more severe the sexual harassment, the less need there is to show a repetitive series of incidents to find a hostile environment. Indeed, a single instance of harassment may be sufficient to create a hostile environment. Likewise, a series of incidents may be sufficient even if the sex-based harassment is not particularly severe.

Gender-Based Harassment: Unwelcome conduct of a nonsexual nature based on an individual’s actual or perceived sex, including conduct based on gender identity, gender expression, and nonconformity with gender stereotypes.

Sexual Assault: Any sexual act directed against another person, without consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent. Consent is defined below in Section V. Sexual assault includes, but is not limited to, rape, fondling, incest and statutory rape, defined as follows:

  1. Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus, with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
  2. Fondling: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim. This touching can include, but is not limited to, kissing, grabbing, groping, or touching the private parts of another, or causing the other to touch the harasser’s private parts.
  3. Incest: Incest is sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by laws of the state in which the incident occurred.
  4. Statutory Rape: Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent. In Pennsylvania , individuals under 13 years of age can never consent to intercourse; individuals between the ages of 13-16 years of age can never consent to intercourse with a partner more than four years their senior.

Sexual Exploitation: An act or omission to act that involves taking non-consensual, sexual advantage of another, either for their own advantage or the benefit of a third party. Consent is defined below in Section V. Examples of sexual exploitation include but are not limited to the following:

  • Creating a picture(s), movie(s), webcam, tape recording(s), graphic written narrative(s), or other means of memorializing sexual behavior or a state of undress of another person without the other’s knowledge and consent;
  • Sharing items described in the paragraph above beyond the boundaries of consent where consent was given. For example, showing a picture to friends where consent to view it was given for oneself only;
  • Observing or facilitating observation by others of sexual behavior or a state of undress of another person without the knowledge and consent of that person;
  • “Peeping Tom” or voyeuristic behaviors;
  • Engaging in sexual behavior with knowledge of an illness or disease that could be transmitted by the behavior without full and appropriate disclosure to the partner(s) of all health and safety concerns;
  • Engaging in or attempting to engage others in “escort services” or “dating services” which include or encourage in any way sexual behavior in exchange for money;
  • Intentionally, knowingly, or surreptitiously providing drugs or alcohol to a person for the purpose of sexual exploitation; or
  • Exposing another person to pornographic material without the person’s advance knowledge or consent.

Relationship Violence: Any act of violence or pattern of abusive behavior in an intimate relationship, past or present, which is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another partner. Relationship violence can encompass a broad range of behaviors that may include physical violence, sexual violence, emotional violence, and economic violence. Relationship violence includes domestic violence and dating violence.

  1. Dating Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship
  2. Domestic Violence is any act of violence including felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence that affects, but are not limited to:
    • Current and former spouses;
    • Current and former domestic partners;
    • Intimate partners or dating partners who share or formerly shared a common dwelling;
    • Persons who otherwise have a child in common or share a relationship through a child.
    • A person similarly situated to a spouse of the Complainant under the domestic or family violence laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
    • Any other person against an adult or youth Complainant who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Stalking: Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for their safety or the safety of others; or suffer substantial emotional distress. One engages in an impermissible course of conduct if one engages in two or more acts that include, but are not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person in a way prohibited as described above, or interferes with a person’s property. Stalking is also prohibited by Pennsylvania law. The applicable definition from the Pennsylvania Criminal Code, Title 18, is provided in Appendix A. Violation of Pennsylvania’s stalking law will be considered a violation of this Policy.

Retaliation: Any act or attempted acts to seek retribution against anyone in response to a good-faith report of an alleged violation of this Policy or against anyone who has participated in an investigation or related proceeding under this Policy. Susquehanna University strictly prohibits retaliation against any members of its community. Members of the community are prohibited from engaging in actions, directly or through others that are aimed to dissuade a reasonable party or witness from reporting. Prohibited retaliatory acts include, but are not limited to, intimidation, threats, coercion, or discrimination.


Fear of retaliation should never be an obstacle to reporting an incident of alleged sex/gender based harassment, sexual/gender violence including sexual exploitation and relationship violence or stalking.


V. Additional Definitions Applicable to this Policy, including Consent

Consent: For purposes of this Policy, consent is present when words or actions manifest a knowing, active, voluntary, and present agreement to engage in specific sexual or intimate contact. When determining whether consent was present, the University will consider whether a reasonable person(s) in the same position as the Respondent(s) knew, or reasonably should have known, whether a Complainant was able to freely give consent and whether consent was given. Being intoxicated or impaired by drugs or alcohol does not excuse one from the responsibility to obtain consent.

    • Knowing: Consent must demonstrate that all individuals understand, are aware of, and agree to the “who” (same partners), “what” (same acts), “where” (same location), “when” (same time), and “how” (the same way and under the same conditions) of the sexual activity. Consent to engage in sexual activity with one person does not constitute consent to engage in sexual activity with another person.
    • Active: Consent must take the form of words or actions that reveal one’s expectations and agreement to engage in specific sexual activity. This means that silence, passivity, submission, or the lack of verbal or physical resistance (including the lack of a “no”) should not – in and of themselves – be understood as consent. Consent cannot be inferred by an individual’s manner of dress, the giving or acceptance of gifts, the extension or acceptance of an invitation to go to a private room or location, or going on a date.
    • Voluntary: Consent must be freely given and cannot be the result of respondent’s coercion. Coercion is the use of express or implied threats, fraud, intimidation, or physical force which places an individual in fear of immediate harm or physical injury or causes a person to engage in unwelcome sexual activity. A person’s words or conduct amount to coercion if they wrongfully impair the other’s freedom of will and ability to choose whether or not to engage in sexual activity. Coercion also includes administering a drug, intoxicant, or similar substance with the intent to impair that person’s ability to consent prior to engaging in sexual activity.
    • Present: Consent must exist at the time of the sexual activity. Consent to previous sexual activity does not imply consent to present sexual acts; similarly, consent to one type of sexual activity does not imply consent to all sexual activity. Consent may also be withdrawn at any time, provided the person withdrawing consent makes that known in words or actions.

Consent is not present when an individual is incapacitated.

      • Incapacitated: Incapacitation is the inability, temporarily or permanently, to give consent because the individual is mentally and/or physically helpless, asleep, unconscious, or unaware that sexual activity is occurring. Someone who is drunk or intoxicated may be, but is not necessarily Incapacitated. Individuals who are asleep, unresponsive or unconscious are Incapacitated. Other indicators that an individual may be Incapacitated include, but are not limited to, inability to communicate coherently, inability to dress/undress without assistance, inability to walk without assistance, slurred speech, loss of coordination, vomiting, or inability to perform other physical or cognitive tasks without assistance.

A person may appear to be giving consent but may not have the capacity to do so, in which case the apparent consent is not effective. If there is any doubt as to another person’s capacity to give consent, community members should assume that the other person does not have the capacity to give consent.

Complainant: The person alleged to have been subjected to conduct in violation of this Policy.

Reporter: An individual reporting alleged conduct prohibited by this Policy (which may be the same or different from the Complainant).

Respondent: An individual accused of conduct that might be a violation of this Policy.

VI. Immediate Medical Services, Evidentiary Perseveration Information, and Emotional Support Services

The University encourages all members of the University community who believe that they have experienced sexual misconduct or gender based violence to seek immediate medical attention and take steps to preserve pertinent information and tangible materials, regardless of whether or not an individual wishes to make a report to the University or law enforcement.

Medical Services:

The nearest hospital to campus is Evangelical Community Hospital. An advocate from Transitions of PA can be available to transport you to the hospital and/or meet you at the hospital. Evangelical Community Hospital can provide many critical services including:

      • Physical Exam
      • Emergency Contraception
      • STD/HIV Medications
      • Forensic Exam (*A forensic exam, completed by a medical practitioner, is the process through which physical evidence is collected and may include a rape kit. Physical evidence can include photo documentation of injuries, collection of fluids (blood, semen, urine, saliva) and other identifiable objects (hair, clothing with potential DNA)). More information on preserving evidence is provided below after the medical services contact information.

Contact information is as follows:

Transitions of PA (available 24/7)

1-800-850-7948

Confidential Reporting (defined in Section VII)


Evangelical Community Hospital

One Hospital Drive, Lewisburg, PA

570-522-2770

Confidential Reporting (defined in Section VII)


Please note that under Pennsylvania law when a forensic rape exam is completed, a medical provider is required to notify law enforcement to retrieve the exam for safekeeping. Although the medical provider will provide information to law enforcement, the victim is not required to speak with a law enforcement officer at the hospital. Additionally, they can decide on the extent of their participation in a criminal prosecution.

Preserving Information and Tangible Materials

Although in the immediate aftermath of an incident, an individual may not be interested in reporting the incident to the University or in pressing charges, preserving evidence immediately can be vital to a successful investigation if in the future if an individual decides to move forward with a civil, criminal, or University conduct case, or seeks a protective order.

Here are some tips on preserving evidence:

      • Avoid any of the following before seeking medical attention: showering, bathing, douching, brushing of teeth, going to the bathroom, drinking, and/or change of clothing.
      • Similarly, any clothing, towels or bedding should remain untouched pending collection by law enforcement. Whether or not an individual has chosen how to proceed at the time of the medical examination, taking the step to gather evidence will preserve the full range of options to seek resolution through the pursuit of criminal investigation or through the University's complaint processes.
      • If an individual has any bruising or injuries, they should take photos of the bruising with a camera and document the date and time of the photograph (cell phones automatically do this). If an individual goes to the hospital they can do this as it is deemed necessary.

Emotional Services

An individual’s immediate emotional well-being is incredibly important. If you or a friend has been assaulted, you or they may exhibit an array of emotions in a variety of ways from frantic anger to calm sadness. Some cry, some laugh, some yell, some stay silent. Everyone is different and emotional support is important. Licensed mental health professionals are available on campus to meet confidentially about a wide variety of issues, including sexual misconduct and gender based violence. Contact information for emotional care is as follows, more information about emotional services can be found in Appendix B:


Counseling Center

606 University Avenue, Selinsgrove, PA

(570) 372–4751 –business hours

(570)-374-9164 –after hours

Confidential Reporting (defined in Section VII)


Transitions of PA (available 24/7)

Basement of Blough Weis Library

1-800-850-7948

Confidential Reporting (defined in Section VII)


VII. Reporting Policies and Protocols

Susquehanna University is committed to supporting the rights of a person reporting an incident to make an informed choice among options and services available both on and off campus. The University will respond to all non-confidential reports in an integrated, consistent manner that treats each individual with dignity and respect and will take prompt responsive action to end the misconduct and violence, prevent its recurrence, and address its effects. The information below explains things to know before you make a report, where you can make a report, and how those processes work.

Things to Know Before You Report

Non-Retaliation Statement: The University prohibits retaliation against those who file a complaint or third-party report of a violation of this Policy or participates in the investigation and/or disciplinary process (e.g., as a witness) of such a complaint. Complaints of retaliation will be investigated and dealt with as any other complaint brought under this Policy.

Complaints made in good faith under this Policy will not result in any adverse action against the individual, and no other person who participates in good faith in an investigation will be treated adversely because of that participation. However, if an investigation results in a finding that the individual knowingly accused another falsely of an act of a violation of this Policy, then the individual will be subject to appropriate sanctions.

You have the option to report to, or decline to report to, the University and local law enforcement: Although the University strongly encourages prompt reporting of conduct that may violate this Policy, individuals have the option of reporting to (a) local law enforcement; (b) the University, including Public Safety; (c) both (a) and (b); or (d) none of the above. This means that individuals have the right to decline to notify the University or law enforcement officials.

If you want to notify local law enforcement, the University can assist you in notifying those authorities: If an individual wants to notify local law enforcement, then the University will, upon request, help that individual make a report to local law enforcement. A report to local law enforcement is separate from a report to the University.

Information on what is involved in making a police report and contact information for Selinsgrove Borough Police Department and the University’s Department of Public Safety:

Process of Making a Police Report: If an individual would like to file a police report, Public Safety can help make contact with law enforcement. Depending on the circumstances of an incident, Selinsgrove Borough Police Department (SBPD) may meet you at the hospital, on campus, or at the police station. An officer will document the case with a written report. It is very important for an individual to provide the most comprehensive, accurate details of the crime to the officer. Sometimes a person may have distorted memories of the event; it is okay for a person to say “I don’t remember” or “I’m not sure,” without any penalty.

A police interview can take up to a few hours, depending on the circumstances of the case. Questions often include the timeline of events, what (if anything) was said, whether there was additional physical assault or injury, if weapons were used, and any descriptive features that were noticed about the Respondent.

It is likely the officer may go over the events of an assault repeatedly when writing the report; this is intended to gather as many details as possible, to make the strongest case. Information is gathered then given to a detective who will review the same information. All Individuals have the right to stop a report at any time, not complete the report, or request a break, if they feel overwhelmed.

Contact Information: An individual who wishes to pursue criminal action in addition to, or instead of, making a report to the University for a Policy violation may contact law enforcement directly by calling: 911 (for emergencies) or Selinsgrove Borough Police Department (570-374-8655). For additional assistance, the University’s Department of the Public Safety is available by phone (570-372-4444), email (psdispatch@susqu.edu), or in-person (18th Street Commons Community Building).

How the University coordinates with local law enforcement if a report is made to both: University internal investigations and any disciplinary or remedial actions are independent of any civil, criminal or external administrative investigation. The University may pursue an investigation, take appropriate remedial action and/or impose disciplinary sanctions against a member of the University community at the same time the individual is facing criminal charges for the same incident, even if the criminal prosecution is pending, has been dismissed, or the charges have been reduced. In the case where an individual is pursuing civil or criminal investigation the Department of Public Safety will work alongside Selinsgrove Borough Police Department and organize a co-occurring investigation.

Timeframe for Reporting to the University: There is no time limit for when an incident of Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence may be reported; however, reports should be made as soon as possible after the incident, preferably within one year, because the passing of time makes a review of the evidence more difficult and the memories of involved parties may become less tangible.

Information on Medical Amnesty for Individuals Reporting Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence: The University encourages the reporting of prohibited conduct under this Policy. To encourage reporting, an individual who reports prohibited conduct under this Policy, either as a Complainant or a third-party witness, is eligible for medical amnesty under the Medical Amnesty Policy. The University may, however, initiate an educational discussion or pursue other educational remedies regarding alcohol or other drugs. For the complete Medical Amnesty Policy for students, please see the Student Handbook at www.susqu.edu/student_handbook.

The University has a Title IX Coordinator who can provide assistance: Dena Salerno is the University’s Title IX Coordinator. In her role as Title IX Coordinator, Dena Salerno coordinates the University’s compliance with Title IX and oversees the University’s investigation and resolution process for reports of Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence. Dena Salerno is supported by several University administrators who serve as Deputy Title IX Coordinators. Dena Salerno and each Deputy Title IX Coordinator are knowledgeable and trained annually in state and federal laws that apply to matters of Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence, as well as University policy and procedure. Together Dena Salerno and the Deputy Title IX Coordinator comprise the University’s Title IX Response Team. Individuals may contact the University’s Title IX Response Team in order to:

      • receive information regarding an individuals’ rights and courses of action available to resolve reports or complaints that involve conduct prohibited by the Policy
      • file a complaint or make a report of conduct prohibited by the Policy
      • notify the University of an incident or policy or procedure that may raise potential Title IX concerns,
      • receive information about available resources (including confidential resources) and support services relating conduct prohibited by the Policy
      • ask questions about the University’s policies and procedures related to conduct prohibited by the Policy

Contact Information for each member follows:

Dena Salerno

Title IX Coordinator

Assistant Dean of Students

570-372-4302

salerno@susqu.edu

Degenstein Campus Center


Jennifer Bucher

Title IX Employee Investigator

Director of Human Resources

570-372-4157

bucherjennifer@susqu.edu

Selinsgrove Hall


Crystal Gibson

Deputy Title IX Coordinator

Associate Director of Athletics

570-372-4605

gibsonc@susqu.edu

Garrett Sports Complex


Christie Bing Kracker

University Conduct Process

Dean of Students & Campus Life

570-372-4139

kracker@susqu.edu

Degenstein Campus Center


Angelo Martin

Title IX Investigator

Director of Public Safety

570-372-4136

martinma@susqu.edu

Public Safety


Ryan Maxwell

Title IX Investigator

Public Safety Investigator

570-372-4429

maxwellr@susqu.edu

Public Safety


Don Weirick

Title IX Investigator

Associate Director of Public Safety

570-372-4429

weirick@susqu.edu

Public Safety


Reporting To the University, including Confidential Resources

Non-Confidential Reporting: If an individual discloses an incident to a Non-Confidential Reporter but wishes to maintain confidentiality or requests that no investigation into a particular incident be conducted or disciplinary action taken, the University must weigh that request against the University’s obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all individuals.

      • Title IX Coordinator: Anyone can report directly to the University’s Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinators via telephone, email, or in person. Contact Information for the Title IX Coordinator and each Deputy Title IX Coordinator is listed above.
      • Online Reporting: www.susqu.edu/titleix (*This form may also be used for non-emergency Anonymous reporting by not including one’s name. Depending on the level of information available about the incident or the individuals involved, the University’s ability to respond to an anonymous report may be limited. The University will, however, take whatever steps it deems appropriate and in the best interests of the overall University community, consistent with the information available.)

Responsible Employees: Responsible Employees must report to the Title IX Coordinator all information they learn about the alleged incident shared by the individual – including the names of the Complainant and Respondent(s), any witnesses, and any other relevant facts, including the date, time, and specific location of the alleged incident. Failure by a Responsible Employee to timely report suspected Prohibited Conduct may subject them to appropriate discipline, up to and including removal from their position. A Responsible Employee is not required to report incidents of Sexual Misconduct or Gender Based Violence that are not directly brought to that employee’s attention for the purposes of reporting (in class discussions, student writing assignments and/or presentations are exempt from responsible reporting).

At Susquehanna University, a Responsible Employee is any faculty or staff member employed by the University who has not otherwise been specifically identified and defined in this Policy as a Confidential Resources or a Semi-Confidential Reporter. All students employed by the University are considered Responsible Employees. Should a student group be designated as responsible employees, notice of this will be provided to the University community.

Semi-Confidential Reporting: Semi-Confidential Reporters are required to report the nature, date, time, and general location of an incident to the Title IX Coordinator and, under certain circumstances, to the Department of Public Safety, but are not required to report the Complainant’s name or other personally-identifiable information unless (1) given permission to do so by the person who disclosed the information; (2) there is an imminent threat of harm to self or others; (3) the conduct involves suspected abuse of a minor under the age of 18; or (4) as otherwise required or permitted by law or court order. If the University determines that the Respondent(s) pose a serious and immediate threat to the campus community the Department of Public Safety may be called upon to issue a timely warning to the community. Any such warning will not include any information that identifies the Complainant. For more information on timely warnings see Section XII.

At Susquehanna, Semi-Confidential Reporters are limited to individuals who work or volunteer in the on-campus Health Center or Violence, Intervention and Prevention Center, including front desk staff and student workers. Following is contact information for these non-professional counselors and advocates:


Health Center

620 University Avenue, Selinsgrove, PA

570-372-4385

For emergencies at lunch (noon – 1 p.m.) or after hours call 570-374-9164 to reach the on-call nurse. This nurse is available 24 hours/day, 7 days/week during the academic schedule.


Violence, Intervention, and Prevention (VIP) Center

Location: Basement of Blough Weis Library

Phone Number: 570-372-4063


An individual who speaks to a confidential or semi-confidential resource must understand that, if the individual wants to maintain confidentiality, the University will be unable to conduct an investigation into the particular incident or pursue University disciplinary action against the Respondent. Even so, these counselors and advocates will still assist the individual in receiving other necessary protections and support.

Confidential Resources: Confidential Resources will not share information about an incident unless (1) given permission to do so by the person who disclosed the information; (2) there is an imminent threat of harm to self or others; (3) the conduct involves suspected abuse of a minor under the age of 18; or (4) as otherwise required or permitted by law or court order.

At Susquehanna, Confidential Resources are limited to professional, licensed counselors and pastoral counselors who provide mental health counseling to members of the school community (and including those who act in that role under the supervision of a licensed counselor). Following is the contact information for these individuals:


Counseling Center

606 University Avenue, Selinsgrove, PA

(570) 372–4751—business hours

(570)-374-9164—after hours


University Chaplain

Weber Chapel

(570) 372–4220


Director of Jewish Life

Hillel House—514 University Ave. Selinsgrove, PA

(570) 372 – 4440


Off Campus Counselors and Advocates

Off campus counselors and advocates and health care providers will also generally maintain confidentiality and not share information with the University unless the Individual requests the disclosure and signs a consent or waiver form.


Transitions of PA (local domestic and sexual violence center)

Available office hours in the ________

570-372-_____

24/7 at 1-800-850-7948

Requesting Confidentiality from the University When a Report Is Made to a Non-Confidential Reporting Location: How the University Will Weigh the Request and Respond

If an individual discloses an incident to a Non-Confidential Reporting Location but wishes to maintain confidentiality or requests that no investigation into a particular incident be conducted or disciplinary action taken, the University must weigh that request against the University’s obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all individuals.

There are times when the University may not be able to honor a Reporter’s request in order to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all individuals. The University has designated the following individual(s) to evaluate such requests: Title IX Response Team (defined in Section VII), Director of Public Safety or their designee, and/or Vice President for Student Life.

      • If the University is able to honor the request for confidentiality, the individual must understand that the University’s ability to meaningfully investigate the incident and pursue disciplinary action against the Respondent(s) may be limited.
      • If the University determines that it cannot maintain an individual’s confidentiality, the University will inform the individual prior to starting an investigation and will, to the extent possible, only share information with people responsible for handling the University’s response.

When weighing an individual’s request for confidentiality or that no investigation or discipline be pursued, the Title IX Response Team, Director of Public Safety or their designee, and/or Vice President of Student Life will consider a range of factors, including the following:

      • The increased risk that the Respondent will commit additional acts of sexual or other violence, such as:
        • whether there have been other sexual misconduct or gender based violence complaints about the same Respondent;
        • whether the Respondent has a history of arrests or records from a prior school indicating a history of violence;
        • whether the Respondent threatened further sexual misconduct or gender based violence or other violence against the Complainant or others;
        • whether the sexual misconduct or gender based violence was committed by multiple Respondents;
        • whether the sexual misconduct or gender based violence was perpetrated with a weapon;
        • whether the victim is a minor;
        • whether the University possesses other means to obtain relevant evidence of the sexual misconduct
        • or gender based violence (e.g., security cameras or personnel, physical evidence);
        • whether the individual’s report reveals a pattern of perpetration (e.g., via illicit use of drugs or alcohol) at a given location or by a particular group.

The presence of one or more of these factors could lead the University to investigate and, if appropriate, pursue disciplinary action. If none of these factors is present, the University will likely respect the Reporter’s or Complainant’s request for confidentiality.

VIII. Interim/Remedial Measures and Ongoing Assistance

Interim/Remedial Measures

Interim measures are those services, accommodations, or other assistance that the University puts in place for individuals after receiving notice of alleged sexual misconduct and gender based violence, but before any final outcomes – investigatory, disciplinary, or remedial – have been determined. We want individuals to be safe, to receive appropriate medical attention, and to get the help they need to heal and to continue to access their educational opportunities. We also want individuals to understand their reporting options and how to access available interim measures. The University recognizes that sexual misconduct and gender based violence is traumatic and may leave an individual feeling overwhelmed and confused. This section seeks to provide clear guidance regarding available resources and who is available to help secure them.

How to Request Interim/Remedial Measures

The University offers individuals two options for requesting interim measures, depending on whether the individual disclosed the incident to a Non-Confidential Reporter or a Confidential/Semi-Confidential Resource.

      • If the incident was disclosed to Non-Confidential Reporting Location: An individual can request interim measures directly from the Dean of Students, Dean of Academic Achievement or Title IX Coordinator.
      • If the incident was disclosed to a Confidential/Semi-Confidential Resources Only: Because the University wants individuals to have access to assistance regardless of when or whether they decide to report prohibited conduct to the University, a Confidential/Semi-Confidential Resource may be able to request interim measures from the University on an individual’s behalf. Under this option, however, individuals should be aware that when a Confidential/Semi-Confidential Resource requests interim measures on their behalf from the Dean of Students, Dean of Academic Achievement, or Title IX Coordinator and discloses that the reason for the request is Sexual Misconduct or Gender Based Violence, that request may trigger the University’s Title IX obligation to investigate. To the extent that the Confidential/Semi-Confidential Resource makes such a disclosure, but, consistent with the individual’s wishes, asks that the University not investigate, the Title IX Response Team, Director of Public Safety or other designee and Vice President for Student Life will consider whether it can honor the request as outlined in Section VII.

In assessing or delivering such interim measures, the University will attempt to keep personally identifiable information about the victim as confidential (shared only with persons with a need to know) to the extent that maintaining such confidentiality would not impair the ability of the University to provide such support.

Types of Interim/Remedial Measures & How Determinations Are Made

Under both options above, the University will provide the individual, or the individual’s Confidential/Semi-Confidential Resource, with a written explanation of the interim measures available on campus and through local community resources. This includes:

      • Written notification to students and employees about existing counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, visa and immigration assistance, student financial aid, and other services available to victims, both within the institution and in the community.
      • Written notification to victims about available options for, assistance in, and how to request changes to academic, living, transportation and working situations or protective measures.
      • Written explanation of the student or employee’s rights and options provided when a student or employee reports to the institution that they have been a victim of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, whether the offense occurred on or off campus.

Some possible interim measures are listed below. If an individual or Confidential Resource requests an interim measure not listed below, the University will consider whether the request can be granted. Not all of the measures listed below will be necessary in every case to keep individuals safe and ensure their equal access to educational programs and activities. Susquehanna University determines which measures are reasonably available and necessary for a particular individual on a case-by-case basis, determined by the Dean of Students, Dean of Academic Achievement, and Title IX Coordinator.

      • Academic accommodations (for additional information, see below)
      • Medical and mental health services, including counseling
      • Change in campus housing and/or dining locations
      • Assistance in finding alternative housing
      • Assistance in arranging for alternative University employment arrangements and/or changing work schedules
      • Assistance with the Student Financial Services to help find additional student financial aid options, if income, financial resources, or student’s status changes as a result of the incident
      • Assistance from the Global Opportunities Office, seeking visa and/or immigration assistance
      • A No contact order pending the outcome of an investigation. (Such a directive serves as notice to both parties that they must not have verbal, electronic, written, or third party communication with one another).
        • In some cases, an individual may also wish to consider a Protection from Abuse Order from the local courts. This is a civil proceeding independent of the University. An individual also has the right to file for a Protection from Abuse Order or Sexual Violence Protection Order with the help of an on campus victim advocate from Transitions or on their own at the Snyder County Courthouse Prothonotary Office. If a court order is issued the University will, to the extent possible, assist the protected person in benefiting from the restrictions imposed by the court and will also facilitate on-campus compliance with the order.
      • Providing an escort to ensure that the individual can move safely between school programs and activities
      • Transportation accommodations, such as shuttle service or parking arrangements to ensure safety and access to other services
      • Assistance identifying an advocate to help secure additional resources or assistance including off-campus and community advocacy, support, and services

Additional Information on Academic Accommodations and Disability Services

Academic Accommodations

Academic accommodations are one type of interim/remedial measures, and may include assistance in the following ways:

        • Transferring to another section of a lecture or laboratory
        • Rescheduling an academic assignment or test
        • Accessing academic support (e.g., tutoring)
        • Arranging for incompletes, a leave of absence, or withdrawal from campus
        • Preserving eligibility for academic, athletic, or other scholarships, financial aid, internships, study abroad, or foreign student visas

If the student experiences persistent academic difficulties as a result of the incident (e.g., including difficulties stemming from anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder or any other mental or physical illnesses or injuries), the student or the student’s Confidential/Semi-Confidential Resource may request more long-term academic accommodations, such as a temporary leave of absence. For questions contact the Dean of Academic Achievement, Office of Academic Achievement, Fisher Hall, 2nd Floor, 570-372-4184

Disability Services

Individuals may also be entitled to additional services and supports if they have a disability, including those who developed a disability as a result of experiencing sexual misconduct or gender based violence. For questions contact the Assistant Dean of Academic Achievement and Coordinator of Disability Services Office of Academic Achievement, Fisher Hall, 2nd Floor, 570-372-4340.

Ongoing Assistance:

The goal of the University is to offer support services to any individuals involved in an incident of sexual misconduct or gender based violence. Any member of the Susquehanna community may seek assistance from various on-campus and off-campus resources. Available in Appendix B.

IX. University Conduct Process for Complaints Against Students

Investigation Procedures and Protocols

Reporting an incident of sexual misconduct, gender based violence or retaliation to the University can result in the investigation of whether a violation of this Policy occurred and can also result in University disciplinary action against any student, staff or faculty member, or outside party, who is determined to have violated this Policy. The University will provide a prompt, fair, and impartial process from the initial assessment to the final result conducted by officials who are annually trained on the issues related to sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, as well as how to conduct a process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability.

Initial Assessment Following a Report to a Non-Confidential Reporting Location

After receiving a report of Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence via any of the means identified in Section VIII, the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator will make an initial assessment of the reported information and respond to any immediate health or safety concerns raised by the report. As part of the initial assessment, the Title IX Coordinator will meet with the Complainant and provide them with a written explanation of all available resources and options, including the following:

        • A copy of their rights
        • Available interim measures and accommodations
        • Available immediate and ongoing resources on and off campus
        • General information about the investigation and conduct process

The Title IX Coordinator then will determine the appropriate course of action based on: (1) whether the Complainant wishes to pursue formal resolution or requests anonymity, that an investigation not be pursued, and/or that no disciplinary action be taken; (2) the availability of information or evidence suggesting that a Policy violation may have occurred; and (3) the University’s Title IX obligation to investigate or otherwise determine what happened and take corrective action as appropriate to eliminate, prevent and address the effects of Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence.

When the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator decides to initiate an investigation, impose protective measures that affect the Respondent, or take any other action that impacts a Respondent, the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator will ensure that Respondent is notified and receives written information on available resources and options. The Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator will ensure that a Respondent is informed of:

        • The nature of the investigation, including the identities of the parties (if known), a concise summary of the conduct at issue, and potential Policy violations;
        • A copy of their rights
        • Available interim measures and accommodations
        • Available immediate and ongoing resources on and off campus
        • General information about the investigation and conduct process

When the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator decides to initiate an investigation, the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator will forward the report to the Investigators in the Department of Public Safety who will begin a trauma-informed investigation.

There may be times when an individual meets with the Department of Public Safety for immediate services before the Title IX Coordinator is notified. In this case, Public Safety may begin the investigation process immediately and then send a report to the Title IX Coordinator. In these cases, the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator will meet with the Complainant and the Respondent as described above after receipt of Public Safety’s report.

Resources Available during the Investigatory and Adjudicatory Process

Complainants and Respondents have access to many resources during the University Investigatory and Adjudicatory Process, (i.e., from the initial assessment to the final result). We encourage individuals to avail themselves of these resources.

          • Sexual Misconduct Awareness Resource Team (SMART): SMART team members consist of staff and faculty who serve as caring resources for Individuals, both complainants and respondents, involved in a sexual misconduct Title IX case. Members of the SMART team attend annual training that includes understanding the Title IX process, how it connects with the conduct process, how an investigation is conducted, what accommodations are available to Individuals and how to listen and respond in caring ways. The Title IX Coordinator will offer a SMART team member to all parties involved in a case but individuals are not required to make use of this resource.
          • Silent Support Person: Both Complainants and Respondents may be assisted during the Investigatory and Adjudicatory process by a silent support person of their choosing, including being accompanied by an silent support person at any meeting within the Investigatory and Adjudicatory process under this Policy. The choice whether or not to invite a silent support person is solely that of the Complainant or Respondent involved. Even if accompanied by a silent support person, the silent support person may not speak for that individual or otherwise direct questions to or address others present in any Investigatory and Adjudicatory meeting or hearing (e.g., the opposing party, witnesses, and/or the person conducting the meeting (university official and/or investigator)). During the hearing proceedings, if any, the silent support persons are not permitted to formulate questions or supply questions or responses for the Respondent or Complainant. Their role is strictly defined by the University to offer emotional support during the process. The University may remove or dismiss a Silent Support Person who becomes disruptive or who does not abide by the restrictions on their participation, as determined by the University Official conducting the process.
          • Case Manager: The Case Manager is a Student Life professional who works with the conduct system. This staff member will schedule a meeting with the Respondent and/or Complainant prior to the University Conduct Board hearing, if any. The goal of this meeting is to review the University Conduct Board hearing process and ensure that the Respondent/Complainant is fully informed of the procedures leading up to the hearing; during the hearing; and appeal process. The Individual Conduct Coordinator may also serve in the role of the Board Chair during conduct board hearings.

Investigation & Investigative Report

When the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator decides to initiate an investigation, the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator will forward the report to the Investigators in the Department of Public Safety who will begin a trauma-informed investigation. The Investigators are annually trained on the issues related to sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, as well as how to conduct a process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability.

An investigation will afford both the Complainant and Respondent an opportunity to be heard, to submit information and other evidence, and to identify witnesses. During an investigation, the investigator typically will meet separately with the Complainant, Respondent and pertinent witnesses; offer the parties the equal opportunity to submit and/or identify related and relevant information or evidence; and gather other relevant information or evidence as appropriate. The Investigator(s) will then submit to the Dean of Students a written report of relevant information. The Dean of Student reviews the report and determines if there is sufficient evidence to support a finding of a policy violation. The Complainant is informed of the completed investigation and if there is sufficient evidence to support a finding of a policy violation has the option to choose whether or not to move forward to the conduct process.

          • If the Complainant elects not to move forward, the case is closed. No further action taken unless the Complainant, at a later date, chooses to move forward.
          • If the Complainant elects to move forward, the case is forwarded to the Dean of Students, who determines student charges.
          • If there is insufficient evidence to support a finding of a policy violation the Dean of Students will review and offer support services

The University seeks to resolve complaints under this Policy within 60 business days from receipt of a non-confidential report, excluding days classes are not in session (see additional information about Appeals, on page 26, for additional timeframes). An investigation typically takes 10-15 business days to complete. Generally, within 5 business days after completion of an investigation, the Investigator will provide the investigative report to the appropriate University official(s). Circumstances may require the University to extend this overall time frame or any individual time frame discussed in this Policy. Examples of reasons why time frames may need to be extended include the complexity of the case, delays due to fall/spring/summer/holiday breaks, inclement weather, and other extenuating circumstances. Exceptions to these time frames will be communicated to the Complainant and Respondent.

Resolution/Adjudication Procedure

The University’s process for resolving reports of violations of this Policy will be prompt, fair, and impartial. Because allegations of violations of this Policy can sometimes raise challenging new issues and involve competing interests, the University reserves discretion to take reasonable actions to address those issues in a manner consistent with the spirit of this Policy, and which preserves fairness for both parties and maintains the integrity of the investigation and complaint resolution processes.

Purpose: The purpose of campus conduct proceedings is to provide an evaluation of a Respondent’s responsibility for violating university regulations. Formal rules of evidence shall not be applied, nor shall deviations from prescribed procedures necessarily invalidate a decision, unless significant prejudice to a participant or the university may result.

Complainant and Respondent Rights and Expectations for Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence Violations

            • To have a silent support person of their choice accompany them throughout the process
            • To be present for the entire hearing;
            • To be informed of the Dean of Students decision as soon as it has been made;
            • To have no past sexual history discussed in hearing, beyond history of relations between the Complainant and the Respondent deemed relevant by the University Conduct Board.
            • To be treated with discretion and dignity, including a respect for each party’s privacy.
            • To be able to respond to the decision of the University Conduct Board, a decision which is a recommendation to the Dean of Students based on a preponderance of evidence standard.
            • To be informed of the decision of the Dean of Students in writing and to have the right to appeal to the Vice President for Student Life or designee.
            • Not to be subjected to retaliation or intimidation for lodging a complaint of an alleged violation of this Policy or otherwise participating in the investigation or adjudication of such a complaint.

Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence University Conduct Board (“University Conduct Board”): The University Conduct Boards will be trained and convened by the Dean of Students or designee. The University Conduct Board reviews cases in which the facts of an alleged violation are presented in an effort to determine if a violation(s) took place and what appropriate sanction(s) should be assigned.

              • Respondents are provided an opportunity to respond to the charges by accepting or not accepting responsibility.
              • In board proceedings where the Respondent “Accepts Responsibility” for violating prohibited conduct or other campus policies, Respondents take responsibility for violating the entirety of the policy as outlined in the hearing notification provided by the Dean of Students or designee. The board members allow for closing statements and any clarifying questions the board members have before moving to deliberations about sanction recommendations.
              • An ad hoc hearing board may be established by the Dean of Students or designee whenever the Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence University Conduct Board is not constituted, is unable to obtain a quorum or is otherwise unable to hear a case. An ad hoc hearing board shall be composed of three members, not including students.
              • Both the findings and the sanctions determined by the University Conduct Board shall be regarded as recommendations to the Dean of Students. Respondents and Complainants will be provided simultaneously with copies of the board’s decision through their Susquehanna e-mail address. The Respondent and the Complainant will be given five business days from the date of the decision to appeal to the Vice President.

Hearing Board Procedures: The following procedural guidelines shall be applicable in hearings conducted by the University Conduct Board:

Board Composition: The board shall consist of three trained faculty and staff members with a Board Chairperson and will review cases in which the Respondent has been charged with violating this Policy. All Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence cases will be adjudicated by this board. Any party may challenge a hearing board member or conduct board chairperson on the ground of personal bias or conflict of interest. The Dean’s office notifies complainants and respondents of their board members and conduct board chairperson prior to the hearing. Students should notify the Dean’s office of any personal bias or conflicts of interest in writing, including the grounds for disqualification, within 48 hours of receiving the board member notification.

Notice of Hearing: The Dean of Students or designee shall give Respondents and Complainants (if applicable) notice of the hearing date and the specific charges against the Respondent a minimum of five business days in advance of the hearing. Notice shall be sent through the Respondent’s Susquehanna University e-mail address.

Access to the Case File Before Hearing: Respondent(s) and Complainant(s) shall be accorded reasonable access to the case file, which will be retained in the Office of Student Life until 2 hours prior to the hearing during regular business hours. Respondent(s), Complainant(s), and the Conduct Officers shall have reasonable access to the case file, redacted as appropriate, prior to the conduct hearing. Note that Individuals may not make copies of their case file or record the file in part or whole in method. The case file consists of materials which would be considered “education records,” pursuant to the FERPA; personal notes of university staff members or Complainants are not included. Conduct Board members are expected to be prepared prior to each Conduct Board Hearing in order to provide the most informed and consistent process for Individual Respondent(s) and Complainant(s).

Witnesses in the Hearing: The Dean of Students or their designee may require the appearance of relevant witnesses. Such requirements will be sent through the individuals’ Susquehanna University e-mail address. University students and employees are expected to comply with such requirements, unless compliance would result in significant and unavoidable personal hardship or substantial interference with normal university activities, as determined by the Vice President or a designee. Witnesses shall be asked to affirm that their testimony is truthful and may be subject to charges of violating this Code by intentionally providing false information to the university. Prospective witnesses, other than the Complainant and the Respondent, may be excluded from the hearing during the testimony of other witnesses. All parties, including the Respondent, Complainant, witnesses and silent support persons shall be excluded during board deliberations which shall not be recorded or transcribed.

Impact of Respondent or Complainant’s Failure to Appear at the Hearing: Respondents who fail to appear after proper notice will be deemed to have pled “not responsible” to the charge(s) pending against them. A hearing may be conducted in their absence. There may be occasions where the Respondent and/or Complainant withdraw from the University prior to the resolution of disciplinary proceedings. The University reserves the right to proceed with referrals and proceedings as outlined in the Code of Student Conduct notwithstanding such withdrawal(s). Moreover, no Respondents who have withdrawn from the University while disciplinary proceedings were pending against them may be readmitted to the University without a resolution of all disciplinary matters that were pending at the time of the Respondents’ withdrawal, including, where appropriate, a hearing.

Hearings are Closed to the Public: Hearings will be closed to the public including family members of the Complainant or the Respondent, unless such a family member is appropriately acting as a silent support person.

Recording: Hearings shall be recorded or transcribed. Recordings will be made available to Respondents and, if applicable, Complainants upon written request to the Dean of Students, but may not be copied or stored outside of the Office of Student Life.

Standard of Evidence: The charges against the Respondent must be established by a preponderance of evidence. Preponderance of Evidence: the greater weight of the evidence is used to decide in favor of one side or the other. For example, if 51% of the evidence supports either the Complainant or Respondent, the conduct board will have to find in their favor.

Questions during the Hearing: Complainants and Respondents (not their silent support persons) will be accorded an opportunity to ask relevant questions of those witnesses who testify at the hearing. Questions may be presented in advance to the Conduct Chairperson, who will then in their discretion ask the question of the appropriate party. Additionally, questions may be asked during the hearing, through the Conduct Chairperson. The conduct officer, particularly the Conduct Board Chairperson, shall exercise control over the proceedings to achieve orderly completion of the hearing. Any person, including the Respondent, Complainant, Witness, or silent support person, who disrupts a hearing, may be excluded by the conduct officer and the hearing will continue as scheduled. Statements deemed unduly repetitious or irrelevant by the Conduct Chairperson will be excluded. Board members may ask questions of the parties and all witnesses. They may consider matters which would be within the general experience of university students, faculty and staff members.

Finding of Responsibility or Non-Responsibility: Any determination of responsibility will be supported by brief written findings that will be placed in the case file.

Responding to the Recommendation of the University Conduct Board: Both the findings and the sanctions determined by the University Conduct Board shall be regarded as recommendations to the Dean of Students. Respondents and Complainants, will be notified simultaneously in writing of the outcome, sanction(s), the rationale, and the procedures to appeal through their Susquehanna e-mail address.

Notice of the Outcome, Sanctions, and Appeal Rights: The Respondent and Complainants will receive simultaneous notification in writing of the outcome, the sanction(s), the rationale, and the procedures to appear via Susquehanna e-mail.

Hearings where a Respondent pleads “Accepts Responsibility” for all charges shall include a supplemental proceeding in which either party may submit relevant evidence or make relevant statements concerning the appropriate sanction to be imposed. The past disciplinary record of the Respondent will only be supplied to the board during deliberations following the supplemental proceedings after a determination of “responsible.”

Sanctions

Sanctions may be imposed in accordance with the Sexual Misconduct and Gender Based Violence may be applied to individual students, group of students, student teams, or student organizations for one to two semesters. There are five conduct sanctions and they are accumulative and kept in a student’s conduct file while they remain a student and seven years post departure from the University (withdraw/transfer/graduation) with the exception of Expulsion which is reflected on the student’s transcript permanently. Failure to complete sanctions by their assigned due date and/or according to instruction may result in additional conduct proceedings; fines and/or a Vice President’s hold being placed the student’s University record and their ability to register for classes with the Registrar. A request for the Vice President’s hold to be lifted will be issued once sanctions are completed as originally instructed.

Primary Conduct Sanctions include:

Disciplinary Reprimand: a written reprimand for violation of specified regulations, including a warning that continuation or repetition of prohibited conduct may be cause for additional disciplinary action, including disciplinary probation.

Disciplinary Probation: a trial period during which a student must behave in a manner acceptable to the University. This period can include exclusion from participation in privileged or co-curricular institutional activities for a specified period of time. Additional restrictions or conditions may also be imposed. Violations of the terms of disciplinary probation, or any other violation of this Code of Student Conduct during the period of probation, will normally result in suspension or expulsion from the university. Under the status of disciplinary probation, a student is encouraged to seek advice and counsel from appropriate university officials. Disciplinary probation status may also affect qualifications for some awards, prizes or financial aid, particularly those stipulating conduct acceptable to the university. Disciplinary Probation can affect a student’s ability to apply for or participate in GO Programs.

Disciplinary Suspension: temporary separation from university premises, and other privileges or activities, as set forth in the suspension notice. Students who are suspended are not permitted to participate in any University activities, academic or non-academic, during the suspension timeframe. They may not take part in any official exercise, including commencement. Suspended students are not allowed on Susquehanna University’s premises during their suspension unless prior approval has been granted by the Dean of Students. Any request for the privilege of visiting Susquehanna during the suspension must be received in writing at least seven business days prior to the requested date by the Dean of Students. Is should be understood that the submission of a request does not guarantee approval. The Dean may require the student requesting the privilege meet prior to the date. Decisions regarding the request will be communicated to the student and appropriate university staff.

Disciplinary Deferred Suspension: The sanction of disciplinary suspension may be placed in deferred status for a limited period of time. During this period of time, the student is on notice that any further violations of the Code of Student Conduct will result in the suspension that was originally defined becoming effective immediately without further review. Disciplinary Deferred Suspension may not be imposed for longer than one regular semester. If this sanction is imposed during a semester, it may be imposed for the remainder of that semester and one additional semester.

Expulsion: permanent termination of student status and exclusion from university premises, privileges and activities including, but not limited to: receipt of Susquehanna University degree, registration, class attendance, residence in university-owned housing and use of university facilities. A student who has been expelled is not eligible for readmission. Students expelled from Susquehanna University are not allowed on Susquehanna University’s premises and will receive a No Trespass Order from Public Safety. Expulsion will be kept on file in the Student Life Office, will remain in the student’s conduct record permanently, and will be reflected on transcripts.

In addition to the above sanctions, students may also be assigned additional secondary sanctions.

Secondary Conduct Sanctions:

Restriction or Revocation of Privileges: the recommendation to withdraw a privilege, use of a service, participation in a program, event or activity for a specific period of time. The loss of privilege may prohibit a student or student organization from being released to live off-campus, or from participating in off-campus study (GO Program), co-curricular or athletic activities where the Individual(s) represents the university. Restrictions include, but are not limited to, registering or taking part in organizational or university social activities, the use of a particular university facility, guest privileges or parking privileges.

Restitution: repayment to the university or to an affected party for damages resulting from a violation of this code. Restitution can occur at any level.

Parental Notification: a letter or phone call notifying a parent or guardian of a dependent student (at the time notification is made) that they have committed a violation of law or university policy pertaining to drugs or alcohol or any violation that may result in suspension or expulsion from the University. (See the Parental Notification Policy under the Additional Campus Policies section of this Individual Handbook.)

Fine: fines or administrative fees may be imposed separately or in addition to any other sanction(s). The conduct officer or conduct board shall determine the amount of the fine. A fine requires a student or student organization to pay a sum of money. The fines will be assessed at the discretion of the Dean of Students or their designee.

Additional Sanctions: Additional sanctions may be imposed. Service, research projects or educational programs or activities, including but not limited to, an educational seminar, a treatment program for alcohol or drug abuse or psychological assessments may also be assigned.

Appeals Process

              Appeals Process: Either the Complainant or the Respondent may appeal the Dean of Students decision on responsibility or sanctions in writing to the Vice President or designee. The implementation of sanctions will be deferred during the pendency of the Vice President’s review, unless the sanction of suspension or expulsion is imposed. In cases of suspension or expulsion, the student is immediately removed from campus pending the completion of the appeal process.

Grounds for Appeal: The appeal may be based only on the following grounds:

  1. material procedural error that likely would have significantly impacted the outcome of the hearing;
  2. new relevant evidence to present that was previously unavailable and likely would have significantly impacted the outcome of a hearing; or
  3. sanctions imposed were substantially disproportionate to the findings.

Appeal Procedures:

  1. Within five business days from the date the conduct decision is issued, the Respondent or Complainant shall submit a written statement to the Vice President requesting review of the decision or sanction and detailing the grounds for appeal.
  2. The Appellee (i.e., the non-appealing party) will be provided a copy of the appeal and will have five business days from date of the written notification to submit a written response to the Vice President for Student Life, if desired. A copy of the response will be provided to the Appellant (i.e., the appealing party). No further communications from the Parties in support of or opposition to the appeal will be accepted. The Vice President may request additional information from the conduct board chair or others, if deemed necessary in reviewing the appeal request and making a determination.
  3. The Vice President will typically decide the appeal within ten business days after the time for the Appellee to respond to the appeal has passed.
    • If the Vice President determines there was procedural error that likely would have significantly impacted the outcome of the hearing, the Vice President will order a new hearing before a new Conduct Board.
    • If the Vice President determines that previously unavailable relevant information is presented that likely would have significantly impacted the outcome of the hearing, the Vice President will ask the original Conduct Board to reconvene to consider the information and render a determination after considering the new information.
    • If the Vice President determines the sanction substantially disproportionate to the findings, the Vice President may revise the sanction or order a new hearing before a new Conduct Board solely for the purpose of sanctioning.
  4. The Vice President will provide simultaneous notification in writing of the appeal outcome, as well as any changes to the result of any disciplinary proceeding and when such results become final.

X. University Conduct Process for Complaints Against Employees and Faculty

Informal resolution procedures, such as those set forth in the Anti-Harassment and Non-Discrimination Policy, are never appropriate for violations of this Policy. Complaints under this Policy made against an employee or faculty member will always be handled through a Formal Complaint resolution process, as follows:

A complaint should be made consistent with the section above.

The Office of Human Resources (“OHR”) will conduct an investigation meeting or meetings. Both the Complainant and the Respondent(s) have the right to have an advisor of his or her choice accompany him or her throughout the formal process, including such meetings. However, the role of the advisor is to provide emotional support and, where appropriate, assist in understanding the process. The advisor shall not speak, take notes or in any way attempt to disrupt the process. A putative advisor who does not follow these rules is not acting as a true advisor, and therefor may be removed from that role.

In the event that the Respondent is a Vice-President, the Complainant will file a Complainant will file a complaint with the OHR. The OHR will investigate and the Office of the President will make a final determination. If, however, the Respondent is from the OHR, the Vice President for Finance and Administration will investigate and make a final determination.

Individual investigation meetings will be conducted by the OHR with both the Complainant and the Respondent (each with his/her advisor present if they so desire), and any witnesses who could corroborate or clarify the facts in question. If deemed appropriate in the sole discretion of the University, the University may choose to outsource the investigation to a trained investigator from outside of the University community.

In a typical circumstance, investigation meeting(s) will commence within ten working days of receipt of written complaint. The investigating office or investigator will complete its or his/her investigation, in typical circumstances, within sixty (60) days after the initial written complaint being filed. If the investigation is to take longer than 60 days, both the Complainant and the Respondent shall be so advised, in writing.

At the conclusion of the investigation, investigating office or investigator shall determine, based on its or his/her own analysis of the information gathered, whether it is more likely than not that the that the responding party has violated this Policy. This is known as the preponderance of the evidence standard.

The findings of the investigating office or investigator (i.e., responsible or not responsible, by a preponderance of evidence) shall be provided in writing, simultaneously, to both the Complainant and the Respondent.

No later than ten days after the receipt of the findings of the investigating office or investigator, either the Complainant or the Respondent may appeal the findings. Such an appeal will be filed with the Vice President & Chief to Staff. After an appeal is filed, a three-member President’s Appeal Board will be appointed as needed by the Office of the President. The President’s Appeal Board will be comprised of a faculty member, an administrator and an hourly staff member. To be considered, an appeal must be based only on new evidence that was not available during the investigation, or on a specifically identified procedural error (an “eligible appeal”). Appeals that do not meet these standards will be summarily rejected.

If no appeal is filed, the matter is either considered closed (if the 17 finding is of “not responsible”) or will move to the sanctioning phase, as appropriate.

In preparation of any appeal, both the Respondent and the Complainant will have normal access to their file, and each may be assisted by an advisor, with the same restrictions as noted above.

A hearing on any eligible appeal will be heard by the President’s Appeal Board, which will then forward its recommendation to the President. The Complainant and Respondent and both parties’ advisors may be present at these proceedings.

The President shall review the findings of the President’s Appeal Board and will submit a final decision in writing to both the Complainant and the Respondent within 10 business days of the decision of the President’s Appeal Board.

The findings shall be forwarded to the supervising Vice-President of Respondent, or in the case of faculty, to the Provost, along with the evidence gathered during the investigation meeting(s). The supervising Vice-President or Provost shall determine an appropriate sanction. Sanctions may include:

  • Termination (for faculty such a sanction would follow the procedures outlined in the Faculty Handbook)
  • Suspension with pay
  • Suspension without pay
  • Mandatory Counseling
  • Public censure

XI. Prevention and Education

Sexual misconduct and gender based violence prevention and education cannot exist in a void. How we develop and construct our social lives including our norms, beliefs, expectations, boundaries, and communication skills all affect and intertwine with our culture’s understanding of sexual misconduct and gender based violence. In order to dismantle these scripts our approach must be multi-faceted.

By understanding the culture, we aim to meet our campus community where they are. We offer an array of prevention programming to engage students, faculty, and staff to examine their lives and increase their understanding of accountability and care for others. The University’s educational programming consists of primary prevention and awareness programs for all incoming students and new employees and ongoing awareness and prevention campaigns for the campus community (students and employees) that:

  • Identifies domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking as prohibited conduct;
  • Defines domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking including how those terms are defined in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania;
  • Defines what behavior and actions constitute consent to sexual activity in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania;
  • Provides safe and positive options for bystander intervention that may be carried out by an individual to prevent harm or intervene when there is a risk of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking against a person other than the bystander;
  • Provides information on risk reduction so that students and employees may recognize warning signs of abusive behavior and how to minimize the risk of potential attacks.

All of Susquehanna University athletes and first year students receive preventative education programming. A brief list of our primary prevention programs is included below:

Bystander Intervention (60 minutes): Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual misconduct and gender based violence. The University strongly encourages all community members to take reasonable and prudent actions to prevent or stop any act of sexual misconduct or gender based violence. Each situation is unique and each person has different strengths when it comes to intervention. Taking action may include:

  • Direct intervention: approaching one of the key people involved in the situation and attempting to prevent the situation from escalating further
  • Delegating: involving other people to prevent a situation from worsening. This can include recruiting friends, Public Safety or law enforcement.
  • Distracting: altering the flow, interrupting or shifting a situation to prevent something from worsening.

When considering options, it is most important for Individuals to make the safest choice available to interrupt or intervene in situations that could result in acts of sexual assault, sexual harassment or other sexual misconduct. Community members who choose to exercise this positive moral obligation will be supported by the University and protected from retaliation.

Bystander Intervention training will be conducted at least once per month in 60 minute training sessions. Bystander Intervention 2.0 sessions will be offered once a semester.

Practicing Consent (60-90 minutes): This program is dedicated to creating a safe environment to dialogue about healthy sexuality and sexual relations. It has been created so attendees feel empowered to start defining what they want and how best to effectively communicate that to a future or current sexual partner. Audience members will go through a skill building workshop to establish communication styles and how best to assert and establish boundaries with a partner(s).

Healthy Relationships (60-90 minutes): This program provides information about aspects of healthy relationships, conflict resolution skills and role play scenarios to help walk audience members through various skill building exercises to increase communication skills amongst the people you are closest to.

Escalation Workshop (90 minutes): The Escalation Workshop is a film-based discussion that opens people’s eyes to the warning signs of relationship abuse. The workshop consists of a film, Escalation, followed by a guided discussion led by a trained facilitator.

In addition to primary prevention education the University also offers a variety of awareness based programming included, but not limited to:

Welcome Week Programming: each year Susquehanna University kicks off Welcome Week with an interactive program related to boundaries, healthy relationships and consent.

Domestic Violence & Sexual Violence Action/Awareness Months: Every year our October and April programming offer 30+ opportunities to take action against violence. From pledge signing to interactive boards in Mellon Lounge to weekly conversations in the V.I.P. Center and multiple opportunities to get trained in bystander intervention workshops, there are plenty of ways for students to get involved and raise their awareness regarding warning signs of relationship and sexual violence.

Protect the Nest! Sponsored River Hawks Game: Each semester we will be hosting a tabling event at a River Hawks game to hear about how parents, alumni, players and spectators—Protect the Nest! here at SU, home, and abroad.

Communication Workshops: Communication is hard. We’d like to make it easier! Each month we will be sponsoring an interactive communication workshop focused on a variety of themes. Partnering with different organizations across campus we’d like to help you navigate difficult conversations you might have with your friends, partners, and family members. Topics include: navigating relationship labels, conflict resolution, coming out in a relationship, differing religious/spiritual beliefs, consent, supporting a partner with mental illness, and many more!

The Mask You Live In: This film explores how our culture’s narrow definition of masculinity is harming our boys, men, and society at large and unveils what we can do about it. Using the film curriculum, we will lead masculinity forums across campus at several points throughout the semester.

For a complete list of prevention programming, contact the Violence, Intervention, and Prevention (VIP) Center.

Training

As a result of Act 104 from November 17, 2010 from the Department of Education, which added Article XX-G, “Sexual Violence Education at Institutions for Higher Education” to the Public School Code, as well as the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013, the University offers mandatory educational programs for all employees. These programs include, but are not limited to the following topics:

  • Discussion of sexual misconduct and gender based violence
  • Discussion of consent
  • Discussion of drug and alcohol-facilitated sexual misconduct and gender based violence
  • Information on where/how to get assistance, including the importance of medical treatment and evidence collection, and how to report sexual violence to campus authorities or local law enforcement
  • An explanation of the definitions of sexual misconduct and gender based violence
  • Safe and positive options for bystander intervention
  • Information on recognizing warning signs of abusive behaviors
  • Procedures for pursuing institutional disciplinary action in cases of alleged sexual misconduct and gender based violence
  • Information about how the University works to protect the confidentiality of complainants;

Explanation of counseling, health, mental health, Complainant advocacy, legal assistance and other services available for the campus community

Options of Complainants for, and assistance in seeking, changing academic, living, transportation and working conditions if reasonably available

Persons specifically engaged in response including, but not limited to the Title IX Coordinator, Public Safety staff and officers, responsible employees, Residence Life, Counseling Center staff, Title IX Response team, and Conduct Board Officers also receive mandatory annual continuing education.

Public Awareness Events: The University recognizes, along with the Office of Civil Rights (OCR), that public awareness events and education programs are best served by a higher level of confidentiality. The University wants students to feel free to participate in preventative education programs and access resources. Therefore, public awareness events such as “Take Back the Night” or other forums which students disclose experiences with sexual misconduct and gender based violence are not considered notice to the University for the purpose of triggering an individual investigation unless the individual initiates a complaint.

XII. Understanding the University’s Publicly Available Record Keeping Obligations

Timely Warning

In compliance with federal law, the University will provide timely notice to the campus community regarding certain crimes covered by the Clery Act that are reported to a “Campus Security Authority” (as defined under the Clery Act) and that are considered to be a serious or continuing threat to the safety of students and employees. The manner of notification depends upon the particular circumstances of the crime. The University will make every effort not to release personally identifying information while still providing enough detail for community members to make safety decisions in light of the danger.

Publicly Available Record Keeping

The University will complete publicly available record-keeping, including Clery Act reporting and disclosures, without the inclusion of personally-identifying information about the complainant or respondent.

XIII. Reporting Outside the University

Inquiries or complaints that involve potential violations of Title IX may also be referred to the

U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights

Philadelphia Office

U.S. Department of Education: Office of Civil Rights

The Wanamaker Building

100 Penn Square East, Suite 515

Philadelphia, PA 18107-3323


Telephone: (215)-656-8541 TDD: 1-800-877-8339

Fax: (215)-656-8605

Email: OCR.Philadelphia@ed.gov


U.S. Department of Justice: Civil Rights Division

950 Pennsylvania Ave NW

Educational Opportunities Section, PHB

Washington, D.C. 20530


Telephone: (202)-514-4092 or 1-877-292-3804

Fax: (202)-514-8337

Email: education@usdoj.gov

APPENDIX A

Pennsylvania State Law Definitions

Pennsylvania State law defines specific crimes, including sexual assault, as set forth below. These definitions are provided as a reference.

§ 3124.1. Sexual assault.

Except as provided in section 3121 (relating to rape) or 3123 (relating to involuntary deviate sexual intercourse), a person commits a felony of the second degree when that person engages in sexual intercourse or deviate sexual intercourse with a complainant without the complainant's consent.

§ 3121. Rape.

(a) Offense defined.--A person commits a felony of the first degree when the person engages in sexual intercourse with a complainant:

(1) By forcible compulsion.

(2) By threat of forcible compulsion that would prevent resistance by a person of reasonable resolution.

(3) Who is unconscious or where the person knows that the complainant is unaware that the sexual intercourse is occurring.

(4) Where the person has substantially impaired the complainant's power to appraise or control his or her conduct by administering or employing, without the knowledge of the complainant, drugs, intoxicants or other means for the purpose of preventing resistance.

(5) Who suffers from a mental disability which renders the complainant incapable of consent.

(b) Rape of a child.--A person commits the offense of rape of a child, a felony of the first degree, when the person engages in sexual intercourse with a complainant who is less than 13 years of age.

(c) Rape of a child with serious bodily injury.--A person commits the offense of rape of a child resulting in serious bodily injury, a felony of the first degree, when the person violates this section and the complainant is under 13 years of age and suffers serious bodily injury in the course of the offense.

§ 3122.1. Statutory sexual assault.

(a) Felony of the second degree.--Except as provided in section 3121 (relating to rape), a person commits a felony of the second degree when that person engages in sexual intercourse with a complainant to whom the person is not married who is under the age of 16 years and that person is either:

(1) four years older but less than eight years older than the complainant; or

(2) eight years older but less than 11 years older than the complainant.

(b) Felony of the first degree.--A person commits a felony of the first degree when that person engages in sexual intercourse with a complainant under the age of 16 years and that person is 11 or more years older than the complainant and the complainant and the person are not married to each other.

§ 3123. Involuntary deviate sexual intercourse.

(a) Offense defined.--A person commits a felony of the first degree when the person engages in deviate sexual intercourse with a complainant:

(1) by forcible compulsion;

(2) by threat of forcible compulsion that would prevent resistance by a person of reasonable resolution;

(3) who is unconscious or where the person knows that the complainant is unaware that the sexual intercourse is occurring;

(4) where the person has substantially impaired the complainant's power to appraise or control his or her conduct by administering or employing, without the knowledge of the complainant, drugs, intoxicants or other means for the purpose of preventing resistance;

(5) who suffers from a mental disability which renders him or her incapable of consent; or

(6) (Deleted by amendment).

(7) who is less than 16 years of age and the person is four or more years older than the complainant and the complainant and person are not married to each other.

(b) Involuntary deviate sexual intercourse with a child.--A person commits involuntary deviate sexual intercourse with a child, a felony of the first degree, when the person engages in deviate sexual intercourse with a complainant who is less than 13 years of age.

(c) Involuntary deviate sexual intercourse with a child with serious bodily injury.--A person commits an offense under this section with a child resulting in serious bodily injury, a felony of the first degree, when the person violates this section and the complainant is less than 13 years of age and the complainant suffers serious bodily injury in the course of the offense.

§ 3125. Aggravated indecent assault.

(a) Offenses defined.--Except as provided in sections 3121 (relating to rape), 3122.1 (relating to statutory sexual assault), 3123 (relating to involuntary deviate sexual intercourse) and 3124.1 (relating to sexual assault), a person who engages in penetration, however slight, of the genitals or anus of a complainant with a part of the person's body for any purpose other than good faith medical, hygienic or law enforcement procedures commits aggravated indecent assault if:

(1) the person does so without the complainant's consent;

(2) the person does so by forcible compulsion;

(3) the person does so by threat of forcible compulsion that would prevent resistance by a person of reasonable resolution;

(4) the complainant is unconscious or the person knows that the complainant is unaware that the penetration is occurring;

(5) the person has substantially impaired the complainant's power to appraise or control his or her conduct by administering or employing, without the knowledge of the complainant, drugs, intoxicants or other means for the purpose of preventing resistance;

(6) the complainant suffers from a mental disability which renders him or her incapable of consent;

(7) the complainant is less than 13 years of age; or

(8) the complainant is less than 16 years of age and the person is four or more years older than the complainant and the complainant and the person are not married to each other.

(b) Aggravated indecent assault of a child.--A person commits aggravated indecent assault of a child when the person violates subsection (a)(1), (2), (3), (4), (5) or (6) and the complainant is less than 13 years of age.

§ 3126. Indecent assault.

(a) Offense defined.--A person is guilty of indecent assault if the person has indecent contact with the complainant, causes the complainant to have indecent contact with the person or intentionally causes the complainant to come into contact with seminal fluid, urine or feces for the purpose of arousing sexual desire in the person or the complainant and:

(1) the person does so without the complainant's consent;

(2) the person does so by forcible compulsion;

(3) the person does so by threat of forcible compulsion that would prevent resistance by a person of reasonable resolution;

(4) the complainant is unconscious or the person knows that the complainant is unaware that the indecent contact is occurring;

(5) the person has substantially impaired the complainant's power to appraise or control his or her conduct by administering or employing, without the knowledge of the complainant, drugs, intoxicants or other means for the purpose of preventing resistance;

(6) the complainant suffers from a mental disability which renders the complainant incapable of consent;

(7) the complainant is less than 13 years of age; or

(8) the complainant is less than 16 years of age and the person is four or more years older than the complainant and the complainant and the person are not married to each other.

§ 4302. Incest.

(a) General rule.--Except as provided under subsection (b), a person is guilty of incest, a felony of the second degree, if that person knowingly marries or cohabits or has sexual intercourse with an ancestor or descendant, a brother or sister of the whole or half blood or an uncle, aunt, nephew or niece of the whole blood.

(b) Incest of a minor.--A person is guilty of incest of a minor, a felony of the second degree, if that person knowingly marries, cohabits with or has sexual intercourse with a complainant who is an ancestor or descendant, a brother or sister of the whole or half blood or an uncle, aunt, nephew or niece of the whole blood and:

(1) is under the age of 13 years; or

(2) is 13 to 18 years of age and the person is four or more years older than the complainant.

(c) Relationships.--The relationships referred to in this section include blood relationships without regard to legitimacy, and relationship of parent and child by adoption.

§ 2709.1. Stalking.

(a) Offense defined.--A person commits the crime of stalking when the person either:

(1) engages in a course of conduct or repeatedly commits acts toward another person, including following the person without proper authority, under circumstances which demonstrate either an intent to place such other person in reasonable fear of bodily injury or to cause substantial emotional distress to such other person; or

(2) engages in a course of conduct or repeatedly communicates to another person under circumstances which demonstrate or communicate either an intent to place such other person in reasonable fear of bodily injury or to cause substantial emotional distress to such other person.

(b) Venue.—

(1) An offense committed under this section may be deemed to have been committed at either the place at which the communication or communications were made or at the place where the communication or communications were received.

(2) Acts indicating a course of conduct which occur in more than one jurisdiction may be used by any other jurisdiction in which an act occurred as evidence of a continuing pattern of conduct or a course of conduct.

(c) Definitions.--As used in this section, the following words and phrases shall have the meanings given to them in this subsection:

"Communicates." To convey a message without intent of legitimate communication or address by oral, nonverbal, written or electronic means, including telephone, electronic mail, Internet, facsimile, telex, wireless communication or similar transmission.

"Course of conduct." A pattern of actions composed of more than one act over a period of time, however short, evidencing a continuity of conduct. The term includes lewd, lascivious, threatening or obscene words, language, drawings, caricatures or actions, either in person or anonymously. Acts indicating a course of conduct which occur in more than one jurisdiction may be used by any other jurisdiction in which an act occurred as evidence of a continuing pattern of conduct or a course of conduct.

"Emotional distress." A temporary or permanent state of mental anguish.

"Family or household member." Spouses or persons who have been spouses, persons living as spouses or who lived as spouses, parents and children, other persons related by consanguinity or affinity, current or former sexual or intimate partners or persons who share biological parenthood.

Relationship Violence: Domestic and Dating Violence

The Pennsylvania Crimes Code does not define “Dating Violence” or “Domestic Violence,” but does provide the following “General Rule” regarding probable cause for arrest in domestic violence cases. This “probable cause” standard is different from the standard set forth in this Policy, which requires a preponderance of the evidence. The Pennsylvania Crimes Code states:

§ 2711. Probable cause arrests in domestic violence cases.

(a) General rule.--A police officer shall have the same right of arrest without a warrant as in a felony whenever he has probable cause to believe the defendant has violated section 2504 (relating to involuntary manslaughter), 2701 (relating to simple assault), 2702(a)(3), (4) and (5) (relating to aggravated assault), 2705 (relating to recklessly endangering another person), 2706 (relating to terroristic threats) or 2709.1 (relating to stalking) against a family or household member although the offense did not take place in the presence of the police officer. A police officer may not arrest a person pursuant to this section without first observing recent physical injury to the Complainant or other corroborative evidence. For the purposes of this subsection, the term "family or household member" has the meaning given that term in 23 Pa.C.S. § 6102 (relating to definitions).

Sexual Violence 42 Pa.C.S. §62A03

Conduct constituting a crime under any of the following provisions between persons who are not family or household members:

18 Pa. C.S. Ch. 31 (relating to sexual offenses), except 18 Pa. C.S. §§ 3129 (relating to sexual intercourse with animal) and 3130 (relating to sexual intercourse with animal) and 3130 (relating to conduct relating to sex offenders). 18 Pa. C.S. § 4304 (relating to endangering welfare of children) if the offense involved sexual contact with the Complainant.

18 Pa. C.S. § 6301 (a) (1) (ii) (relating to corruption of minors).

18 Pa. C.S. § 6312 (b) (relating to sexual abuse of children).

18 Pa. C.S. § 6318 (relating to unlawful contact with minor).

18 Pa. C.S. § 6320 (relating to sexual exploitation of children).

Consent

“Consent” is not specifically defined as related to sexual activity. However, it is defined in the Crimes Code as follows:

§ 311. Consent.

(a) General rule.--The consent of the Complainant to conduct charged to constitute an offense or to the result thereof is a defense if such consent negatives an element of the offense or precludes the infliction of the harm or evil sought to be prevented by the law defining the offense.

(b) Consent to bodily injury.--When conduct is charged to constitute an offense because it causes or threatens bodily injury, consent to such conduct or to the infliction of such injury is a defense if:

(1) the conduct and the injury are reasonably foreseeable hazards of joint participation in a lawful athletic contest or competitive sport; or

(2) the consent establishes a justification for the conduct under Chapter 5 of this title (relating to general principles of justification).

(c) Ineffective consent.--Unless otherwise provided by this title or by the law defining the offense, assent does not constitute consent if:

(1) it is given by a person who is legally incapacitated to authorize the conduct charged to constitute the offense;

(2) it is given by a person who by reason of youth, mental disease or defect or intoxication is manifestly unable or known by the actor to be unable to make a reasonable judgment as to the nature or harmfulness of the conduct charged to constitute the offense;

(3) it is given by a person whose improvident consent is sought to be prevented by the law defining the offense; or

(4) it is induced by force, duress or deception of a kind sought to be prevented by the law defining the offense.

APPENDIX B

Student Resource Guide

Confidential

(All student info remains confidential)

Counseling Center: Available as a free resource to students. They can help processing trauma related to gender based violence.

  • To schedule an appt. call:570-372-4751
  • For emergencies:
  • 570-372-4751 (bus. hrs)
  • 570-374-9164 (after hrs & weekends)

Transitions of PA is the county designated domestic and sexual violence center. They have drop-in counseling available on campus in the VIP Center.

  • Drop in between 1pm-5pm at the VIP Center or call to schedule an appointment, 570-372-4751.
  • Located at: VIP Center, basement of the Library

Chaplain’s Office: Available for those with or without a religious background. Providing confidential support and active listening related to gender based violence.

  • Call 570-372-4220 to speak with the Chaplain. Located in: Weber Chapel.
  • Call 570-372-4440 to speak with the Director of Jewish Life. Located at: 514 University Ave.

Semi-Confidential

(incident is reported, but no student info is given)

Health Center: Available for medical attention in the aftermath of an incident related to gender based violence. Often the survivor is referred and transported to Evangelical Community Hospital, depending on the level of medical care needed.

  • Call 570-372-4385 to make an appointment.
  • Located at: 620 University Ave.

VIP Center: A center for providing confidential survivor services through Transitions of PA and campus prevention efforts (semi-confidential).

  • Located at: Basement of the Library

Responsible Employee

(must complete a Title IX Reporting Form, if a disclosure is received)

Title IX Coordinator: Available to discuss and assist with on-campus resources and an overview of the process for investigation of gender based violence issues.

  • Call 570-372-4404
  • Located in: Student Life Suite

Public Safety: Available 24 hours a day to discuss on-campus resources and an overview of their role in the process of investigations for gender based violence issues. Public Safety investigates incidents for the purpose of student conduct cases.

A formal report is never filed with the local police department without the consent of a victim.

  • Call 570-372-4444 to speak with a Public Safety office. Available 24 hours a day.
  • Located at: 18th Street Commons Community Building.

Off Campus Resources

Selinsgrove Borough Police Department: Available 24 hours a day to discuss criminal prosecution options that the student may have regarding an incident of gender based violence. Selinsgrove PD respects the wishes of students in regards to pursuing criminal charges.

  • Call 570-374-8655 or 911 to speak with the Selinsgrove Borough Police Department.
  • Located at: 100 West Pine Street Selinsgrove, PA 17870

Evangelical Community Hospital: Available 24 hours a day, a student can go to the hospital for several options related to gender based violence incidents. These include, but are not limited to:

Forensic Rape Exam: to collect evidence in the aftermath of an assault. Police are called to collect the kit, but a student will never be forced to speak with an officer at the hospital.

Physical Exam: to assess, document, and treat injuries

Emergency Contraception: to help prevent pregnancy

STD/HIV Medications: to assist with the prevention of developing several common STDs and HIV

  • Call 570-522-2770
  • Located at: One Hospital Drive, Lewisburg, PA 17837

A confidential advocate from Transitions can take you to the hospital and sit with you during your visit. The cost of any of the procedures is covered by the Victim’s Compensation Fund.


Online Resources

MaleSurvivor.org Online forum, webinars, resources, specific to male survivors of sexual violence. Can be accessed privately, support specifically for male identified persons.

  • Online forums for support
  • Online support groups
  • Resource Directory

The Network La Red Online resources available as well as a 24/7 crisis hotline for LGBTQ+, poly, and kink/BDSM community. Also, provides culturally specific counseling services for people of color and bilingual survivors of abuse.

  • Available 24/7:
  • 617-742-4911 (Voice)
  • 617-227-4911 (TTY)
  • 1-800-832-1901 (Toll-Free)

Stalking Resource Center Online resources available as well as a 24/7 crisis hotline via Survivor Connect for any victims of stalking.

  • Available from 8:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
  • 1-855-484-2846
  • Online chat available 9:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. with an advocate

National Domestic Violence Hotline Available 24/7 and accessible to all survivors of domestic/dating violence. Includes a hotline and chat line. Bilingual services available.

  • Available 24/7:
  • 1-800-799-7233
  • 1-800-787-3224 (TTY)
  • Online chat w/ an advocate

Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN) Online resources available as well as a 24/7 crisis hotline and chat line for any victims of sexual violence.

  • Available 24/7:
  • 1-800-656-4674
  • Online chat w/ an advocate

LoveisRespect Online resources available specific to University students. 24/7 online chat, text chat line, peer advocates, and healthy relationships app: MyPlan. MyPlan includes a safety assessment, a self-designed safety planning tool, direct access to telephone, online, or text chat lines. MyPlan for Android. MyPlan for Apple.

  • Available 24/7:
  • 1-866-331-9474
  • 1-866-331-8453 (TTY)
  • Online chat w/ an advocate
  • Texting hotline: 22522

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICY

Susquehanna University is committed to the education of students when it comes to drugs and the legal, safe, and responsible use of alcohol. The misuse, abuse, or illegal use of alcohol and other drugs – on or off campus – including behaviors that allow underage drinking or promote excessive consumption of alcohol, are prohibited and will be addressed through the Student Conduct System if brought to the attention of university officials. As outlined in the Code of Student Conduct, students may be accountable in both criminal, civil, and university jurisdictions for acts that constitute violations of the law and of the Code of Student Conduct. Susquehanna will cooperate with all agencies responsible for the enforcement of federal and state laws concerning drugs and alcohol.

The University, by this policy, assumes no culpability for the behavior of any individual student with respect to his or her use or non-use of drugs and alcoholic beverages or for the results or consequences of his or her conduct and hereby disclaims such responsibility. In accordance with the intentions of the Higher Education Amendments of 1998, Susquehanna University reserves the right to inform the parents or legal guardians of students under 21 who have violated laws on the use or possession of alcohol or drugs.

The university prohibits the use, possession, and sale of illegal drugs. The university prohibits the sale of alcohol. Students who are 21 years of age or older may possess, for their own use, and/or consume alcoholic beverages only in the privacy of their own rooms or the privacy of a residence hall room of other 21 year olds. All persons assigned to live in a residence hall room must be 21 years of age or older for the room to contain alcohol. Alcohol may not be stored or consumed in common areas of residence halls. Students who are under the age of 21 may not be present in residence hall rooms where there is alcohol.

Alcohol is not permitted in other campus buildings or outdoors unless associated with an approved campus event. All events with alcohol present must be approved by a member of the president’s senior leadership team or designee. Any university department wishing to have alcohol present at an event must follow appropriate procedures through Events Management.

Student Organizations wishing to have alcohol present at an event must follow the guidelines in the “Registered Events Overview.” Student activities allocations may not be used for the purchase of alcoholic beverages.

Student tailgating is permitted for home athletic games and must be registered appropriately through Events Management and the Office of Leadership & Engagement.

PEACEFUL ASSEMBLY POLICY

The residential, liberal arts college is dedicated to research, teaching, and service. Susquehanna University encourages open, on-going intellectual engagement and debate by members of the University community through civil, mutually respectful interactions that preserve the openness of public dialogue and debate. As such, the right to dissent is essential to academic freedom and scholarly pursuits. Susquehanna expects all members of the community to be respectful of each other and to contribute in positive ways to an orderly and civil exchange of diverse ideas and opinions. Susquehanna wants all community members to feel welcome and safe in an environment dedicated to the critical discussion of complex and challenging ideas. Accordingly, Susquehanna University permits University students to assemble and express views on campus subject to this policy, consistent with its mission and its commitment to protecting campus buildings, grounds, and facilities.

All University students must adhere to these specific guidelines when engaging in peaceful assembly and protest on campus. Examples of types of peaceful assembly covered by this policy include (please note that this is not an exhaustive list):

  • Demonstration - A large group of people, usually gathering for a cause. It often includes a group march, ending with a rally or a speaker. A demonstration is similar to a protest in that they both can use the same or similar methods to achieve goals.
  • March - A walk by a group of people to a place in order to express an objection with any event, situation, or policy
  • Picket Line - A line or group of people who are refusing to go to work until their employer agrees to certain demands
  • Protest - A protest is an organized way to express objections with any event, situation, or policy. These objections can be manifested either by actions or by words.
  • Sit-In - Any organized protest in which a group of people peacefully occupy and refuse to leave university premises.
  • Vigil - An observance of commemorative activity or event meant to demonstrate unity around a particular issue or concern, and/or to promote peace and prevent violence.

These forms of expression are permitted on campus so long as they are orderly, lawful, do not disrupt or interfere with the regular operations or authorized activities of the University, and comply with the requirements of this policy and all other policies within the Student Handbook.

The following guidelines apply to all types of assembly and protest on campus by University students:

Notification

  • To ensure safety and the orderly functioning of the University, assembly and protest should be registered no later than five business days before the assembly/protest through the Events Management Office. If for some extraordinary reason organizers cannot submit a notification five business days prior to the assembly or protest, the regular operations and special functions of the University must be respected, and organizers still must notify the Events Management Office prior to the assembly or protest.
  • Upon receiving written notification, a University representative will offer to meet with organizers to provide appropriate support and resources to mitigate risk and protect participants’ ability to assemble and protest. Notifications received fewer than five business days before the assembly may be reviewed subject to staff availability; however, support and resources may be limited.

Time

  • Indoor assemblies and protests must occur within the hours of normal operations for the facility or space in which they occur (if applicable). Buildings will not be kept open beyond regular hours to accommodate assemblies.
  • Assemblies are prohibited during final exams.
  • Assemblies cannot extend past 12 a.m. or a time determined by an authorized University official, whichever is earlier.

Place

  • Students may hold peaceful assemblies and protests in any venue that can be reserved for events.
  • Assemblies may not take place in any space that has been concurrently reserved or scheduled by other members of the University community or guests.
  • It is not permissible to occupy or assemble in University offices for purposes of engaging in expressive activities.
  • Assemblies and protests may not impede the free flow of pedestrian or vehicular traffic, block thoroughfares, or obstruct campus building/office/room entry or exit points.
  • The University makes the final determination on the most appropriate venue for assemblies and protests.

Manner

  • All forms of assembly and protest should not disrupt or interfere with the normal operations of the University or with the ability of other members of the community to engage in and benefit from the programs and services of the University, and must adhere to all other applicable policies.
  • Protesters will conduct themselves in a peaceful and orderly manner and should not disrupt classes, meetings, assemblies, or academic pursuit.
  • When assemblies and protests occur in the context of a speaker on campus, audience members should behave in a civil manner and not infringe upon others’ ability to view or hear the speaker.
  • Protesters should respect the rights of all people, property, and the environment and should not represent a threat to public safety or physical property.
  • Assemblies and protests may not take place in a manner that violates the law, defames any individual, constitutes a genuine threat or harassment, or incites violence.
  • While participating in an assembly, individuals are prohibited from possessing or utilizing objects and/or apparel that could present a threat to the health or safety of the campus community including, but not limited to, weapons, pepper spray, mace, torches, helmets, or protective armor or gear or similar items that could cause injury or harm to others, whether intentionally or unintentionally.
  • Assemblies and protests may not utilize amplified sound in a manner that interferes with classes or other events in progress.
  • Individuals engaged in an assembly may not claim to speak for or otherwise represent the position of the University, unless officially sanctioned by the University. Sanctioning occurs as part of the Notification process described above.

Failure to comply with this policy or with the direction of law enforcement or University officials can result in removal from the event and referral to the student code of conduct process. The University may interrupt or stop any assembly or protest that violates this policy or other policies or the Student Handbook. A decision to interrupt or stop an assembly or protest is final. If an assembled group does not voluntarily disperse when warned that its behavior is unacceptable, the University may request that the Department of Public Safety or local law enforcement take action to restore order to the University.

Persons and groups who are not members of the University community (i.e., persons who are not University students, faculty, administrators, or staff) are not permitted to engage in assembly or expression on campus. Their presence on campus is contingent on their compliance with the University’s policies and procedures, and they must leave the campus if directed to do so at any time for any reason by any authorized official of the University. The University will not allow non-University groups to hold protests on campus property or at University events. Failure to accept the directions of authorized University officials may render nonmembers of the University community liable to action by local law enforcement.

POLITICAL ACTIVITY ON CAMPUS POLICY

Policy Summary

Susquehanna University is committed to the free expression of political views by members of the campus community and to the value of discourse and debate in the educational process. The university’s policy on “Academic Freedom” and “Statement of Professional Ethics” are printed in the Faculty Handbook. Nothing in the following policy shall be construed as superseding these foundational policies for the university. Rather, the following policy should be understood as clarifying and elaborating how academic freedom should be exercised while respecting and protecting the university’s status as a tax-exempt institution. The university encourages students and other members of the campus community to learn about and participate in the political process. The purpose of this policy is to provide clear guidelines for Susquehanna University faculty, staff and students as to how they might appropriately do so.

Reason(s) for the Policy

To provide clear guidelines for permissible political activity by Susquehanna University faculty, staff and students in compliance with all election laws applied to non-profit institutions. Unless otherwise stated, activities listed as permitted or prohibited apply to faculty, staff or students acting in a capacity that could be construed as representing the university as an institution. The status of “permitted” or “prohibited” does not apply to activities clearly undertaken in an individual capacity as teachers, academic, intellectual, scholar, writer or citizen. Examples of situations when an activity could be construed as representing the university as an institution include, but are not limited to: using an official university email address; performing the activity on university property; posting messages on university space, virtual or materials; or failing to appropriately distinguish in the public sphere between a personal view and an institutional one.

Permitted Activities

    • Voter education and voter registration
    • Conducting training programs designed to increase public understanding of the electoral process or to encourage citizens to become involved in the process, provided that such training is nonpartisan in the recruitment of instructors, the selection of students, and the curriculum. The program should be widely publicized.
    • Annually preparing and distributing a compilation of voting records of all members of Congress on major legislative issues that involve a wide range of topics, without political skew and without editorial opinion, provided that the information is not geared to coincide with the election period. Guides such as these should avoid rating candidates, even if the rating criteria are nonpartisan (e.g. based on professional qualifications) and should not be accompanied by a statement or actions that tie a position articulated in the guide to a particular candidate or election (see below for more details on publishing ratings of the candidates).
    • Circulating unbiased questionnaires to all candidates for an office, and tabulating and disseminating the results; provided that the questionnaires cover a broad range of subjects and neither reflect political skew nor contain editorial opinion. Candidates should be given a reasonable amount of time to respond to the questionnaires. To the extent the questionnaires include questions with “yes” or “no” answers, candidates should be given an opportunity to explain their answers.
    • Conducting public opinion polls with respect to issues (rather than candidates), provided that the questions are framed to be fair and neutral, accepted polling techniques are used, and the questions do not directly or indirectly concern records or positions of particular candidates or parties. With respect to such activities of faculty, the limitations should be address with due regard for academic freedom.
    • Participating in non-partisan voter registration activities.
  • Candidate appearances
    • Providing access to air time on a university-owned radio station on an equal basis to all legally qualified candidates for public office, in a manner consistent with the limits imposed by the Federal Communications Commission standards.
    • Providing opportunities to speak at university events on an equal basis to all legally qualified candidates for public office. If the university chooses to invite candidates to speak individually in their capacity as a candidate, it must take steps to ensure that all such legally qualified candidates are invited and that none are favored in relation to the activity. For example, if the university invites one candidate to speak at a well-attended annual banquet, but invites another candidate to speak at a sparsely attended general meeting, the university will not have provided equal opportunity to participate. An explicit statement should be made as part of the introduction of the speaker and in communications concerning the speaker’s attendance that the university does not support or oppose the candidate. Campaign fundraising at the event is prohibited. The university must make reasonable efforts to ensure that the appearances constitute speeches, question-and-answer sessions or similar communications in an academic setting and are not conducted as campaign rallies or events.
    • Conducting university-sponsored public forums to which legally qualified candidates for a public office (or for the nomination of a particular party) are invited and given equal access and opportunity to speak, if the format and content of the forum are presented in a neutral manner.
    • Inviting candidates to appear in a non-candidate capacity, provided that the individual chosen to speak solely for reasons other than his or her candidacy, the individual speaks only in his or her non-candidate capacity, no reference to the election is made, and the university maintains a nonpartisan atmosphere on the premises or at the event. Campaigning at the event is prohibited. The university should clearly indicate the capacity in which the candidate is appearing and should not mention the candidacy or the upcoming election in any communications announcing the candidate’s attendance.
  • Issue advocacy
    • Engaging in usual and permissible lobbying and public policy education activities, within the constraints ordinarily applicable to such activities conducted by the university.
  • Use of university resources
    • Establishing genuine curricular activities aimed at educating students with respect to the political process. For example, a political science program may, as part of a for-credit course, have students participate in several weeks of classroom work to learn about political campaign methods, and then be excused from classes to participate in campaigns of their choice, without the university influencing which campaigns are chosen.
    • Rearranging the academic calendar to permit students, faculty and staff to participate in the election process, if the rearrangement is made without reference to particular campaigns or political issues; provided that the recess is in substitution for another period that would have been free of curricular activity.
    • Providing financial and administrative support to a student newspaper even though the newspaper publishes editorial opinions on political and legislative matters.
    • Allowing established student groups to use university facilities for partisan political purposes, provided that such groups pay the usual and normal charge, if any, for use of university facilities by student groups. Fees usually are not required for traditional, on-campus student political clubs. Generally, groups other than student groups should be charged. Administrators and faculty should take special care in relation to any such proposed student activities, to avoid the appearance of university endorsement and to observe the other principles this policy identifies. Subject to applicable law, the university may decline to permit their facilities to be used for such purposes.
  • Participation in the election process by faculty, administrators, and other employees of the university
    • Members of the university community are entitled to participate or not, off hours, as they see fit, in the election process; provided that speaking or acting in the name of the university is prohibited except as described in this policy; provided further that they are not acting at the direction of a university official; and provided further that if the university is identified, that the opinions expressed are not the opinions of the university should be communicated. It is acceptable for faculty, students, and staff to express classroom political opinions so long as it is clear, in context, that the opinion is an individual one. It is profoundly inappropriate to require the expression of a particular political opinion as a class assignment – for example, signing a petition of support for a political candidate, or requiring students to write letters to their congressional representative advocating a specific law or political action. Likewise, it is impermissible to grade based on political opinion rather than on the academic standards of the relevant discipline.
    • A faculty member, administrator or other employee may, engage in federal campaign-related activity that is (a) outside normal work hours; (b) within ordinary work hours, if the time is made up within a reasonable period by devoting a comparable number of extra hours to work for the university; (c) charged to vacation time to which the person is then entitled or occurs during a regular sabbatical leave; or (d) during a leave of absence without pay taken with the university’s approval. Senior staff members, such as the president and vice presidents, should ordinarily refrain from or otherwise limit campaign activity, as there is a risk that such activity would be perceived as support or endorsement by the university.
    • Public statements, oral or written, by university officials (such as the president, vice presidents, and deans) in support of a candidate, political party or the like, where the university official clearly indicates that his or her comments are personal and not intended to represent the views of the university. For example, the IRS condoned a full-page advertisement in a local newspaper, paid for by a candidate, where the advertisement referred by name and title to the president of a 501(c)(3) organization as a campaign supporter, when the ad expressly stated that the “titles and affiliations of each individual are proved for identification purposes only.”

Prohibited Activities: when the action can be construed as representing the university as a whole.

  • Voter Education (including voter guides) and voter registration
    • Conducting “voter education” activities, such as those involving questionnaires, if confined to a narrow range of issues or skewed in favor of certain candidates or a political party. For example, the IRS disapproved such activities that involved selecting voting records of certain incumbents on a narrow range of issues, such as “land conservation.”
    • Publishing ratings of candidates, particularly in situations where the ratings could be viewed as reflecting the views of the university, or university resources are used in connection with the preparation or publication of such ratings without reimbursement at the usual and normal charge.
    • Endorsing, expressly or impliedly, a candidate for public office. Examples of endorsement include the placement of signs on university property that show support for a particular candidate, and contributing to political campaign funds. Examples of implied endorsement are public statements at a university event by an official of the university, praising a particular candidate in relation to holding of public office, and a pattern of university activities in relation to or support of a particular candidate. As with all of the prohibitions discussed in this policy, such a prohibition applies even if the candidate is an administrator or faculty member of the university. However, the policy does not apply to students’ private rooms in residence halls, where individual political expression is permissible.
    • Commenting on specific actions, statements or positions taken by candidates, including incumbents, in the course of their campaigns. The university is not forbidden to comment on specific issues pertinent to its tax- exempt purposes, particularly if it has a track record of commenting on such issues in non-election years.
    • Promoting action (voting) with respect to issues that have become highly identified as dividing lines between candidates. This principle does not bar the institution from commenting on issues critical to its tax-exempt purposes, if it has a track record of commenting on such issues in non-election years with respect to such issues.
    • Coordinating voter education activities with campaign events.
  • Use of university resources
    • Coordinating university fund-raising with fund-raising of a candidate for public office, political party, or the like.
    • Reimbursing university officials for campaign contributions.
    • Providing mailing lists, use of office space, email, telephones, photocopying or other university facilities or support to a candidate, campaign, political party, political action committee (PAC) or the like.
    • Using university letterhead in support of a candidate, political party, PAC or the like.
    • Sponsoring events to advance the candidacy of particular candidates.
    • Using message boards and forums affiliated with the university’s website to support particular candidates, if the statements of the provider of the information can be reasonably attributed to the university. A disclaimer that states that the opinions are neither those of the university nor sanctioned by the university is recommended in those public discussion areas where the information could reasonably be attributed to the university.
    • Providing hyperlinks to the webpages, or other space on the university’s website, of one or more candidates for public office in a manner that favors one candidate over another. Generally, information posted on a university’s website that favors or opposes a candidate for public office is treated the same as if it was distributed printed material, oral statements or broadcasts that favored or opposed a candidate.
    • Providing a candidate forum, to promote his or her campaign if other candidates are not treated equally, even if the forum is not intended to assist the candidate. For example, the IRS concluded that a charitable organization violated the prohibition on campaign intervention when the candidate solicited funds on the organization’s behalf, because the content of the solicitation included campaign rhetoric.
  • Participation in the election process by faculty, administrators, and other employees of the university
    • Public statements, oral or written, by university officials (such as the president, vice presidents and deans) in support of a candidate, political party or the like, where there is risk that the statements would be perceived as support or endorsement by the university. For example, the IRS has indicated that it would be inappropriate for a column titled “My Views” to appear in the university’s monthly newsletter in which the university president stated, “it is my personal opinion that Candidate U should be reelected,” even though the president paid part of the cost of the newsletter.
    • Remarks at a university meeting by a university official in support of a candidate, political party, or the like. For example, university officials should not make statements that could be perceived as support for a particular candidate at a meeting of the board of trustees.

This policy is adapted from the American Council on Education Memorandum on Political Campaign-Related Activities at Colleges and Universities prepared by the Washington, DC law firm Hogan Lovells US LLP (September 2014).Original Policy: 5/1/2016 Revised: 5/1/2016

HIV INFECTION/AIDS POLICY

Susquehanna University's policy with respect to persons infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is based upon concern for the welfare of the total campus community and for the infected individual within the community. The policy's essence is health education and risk reduction activities to convey current information, using the best resources available. Educational information is consistent with and supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, United States Public Health services, the American College Health Association, and the Pennsylvania Department of Health.

Susquehanna University is committed to adhering to the standards established by the Federal Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 prohibiting discrimination based on a person's disability, which includes HIV/AIDS. Therefore, these persons will not be barred from participation in residential, academic and student activities or employment as the university must guarantee the legal rights of these individuals.

Specific information concerning the student or employee with HIV infection/AIDS will not be shared with other students, faculty, administration, staff, other institutions, insurers or parents without the permission of the student or employee. This statement is consistent with general policy whereby all individual medical records are treated in a confidential manner. Public Health reporting requirements for the State of Pennsylvania however, are observed.

The Health Center Staff will provide information to students or staff regarding HIV testing. This will include information about the limitations of the test, as well as locations for testing where confidentiality, anonymity and pre- and post-test counseling is available. Students who know they are HIV infected are strongly encouraged to notify the Health Center so that the staff may assess the need for further medical evaluation, counseling and/or referral.

SERVICE AND ASSISTANCE ANIMAL POLICY

Susquehanna University is committed to providing reasonable accommodations to individuals with disabilities. Individuals with disabilities who require the use of Service Animals as a reasonable accommodation may be permitted to bring such animals on campus as long as they comply with the applicable University policies below. Students who require the use of Assistance Animals may be permitted to bring such animals into University housing as long as they comply with the applicable University policies below. As outlined in the Residence Life On-Campus Housing Policies in the Student Handbook, “Animals (with the exception of small fish in a 20-gallon or less tank, service or assistance animals) are not permitted in the residence halls.”

This policy addresses service and assistance animals for students. Members of the Faculty and Staff should contact the Department of Human Resources for information and procedures regarding Service and Assistance Animals on campus.

Definitions

  • Service Animals: In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines, a "Service Animal" is defined as a dog, or in some cases a miniature horse, that has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual or other mental disability. Other animals, whether wild or domestic, do not qualify as Service Animals. A Service Animal assists a person with a disability with activities of daily living
  • Assistance Animal: In accordance with the Fair Housing Act guidelines, an “Assistance Animal” works, provides assistance, or performs tasks for the benefit of a person with a disability. An Assistance Animal may also provide emotional support to alleviate one or more identified symptoms or effects of a person's disability. No special training is required. An assistance animal is not a pet. The purpose of the Assistance Animal is to perform the assistance or provide the benefit needed as a reasonable accommodation to allow a person with a disability to enjoy his or her housing. Unlike a Service Animal, an Assistance Animal does not assist a person with a disability with activities of daily living. While an Assistance Animal may be considered for access to University housing, they are not permitted in other buildings of the University (e.g. library, academic buildings, classrooms, gym, dining facilities etc.).
  • Owner of a Service Animal: The “Owner of a Service Animal” is a student, faculty member, or staff member who has requested the accommodation and has received approval to bring the Service Animal on campus.
  • Owner of an Assistance Animal: The “Owner of an Assistance Animal” is the student who has requested the accommodation and has received approval to bring the Assistance Animal into his or her residence within University housing.

Procedures to have Service Animals on Campus

  • Students with disabilities who desire to use a Service Animal on campus must formally register with the Office of Disability Services and request the use of a Service Animal as an accommodation.
  • Upon receiving a request for the use of a Service Animal, the Director of Disability Services will schedule an appointment with the student to discuss the accommodation request.
  • If it is not readily apparent that the Service Animal is trained to do work or perform tasks for the individual, then the Director of Disability Services will ask:
    • Whether the Service Animal is required because of a disability, and
    • What work or tasks the Service Animal has been trained to perform
  • If a student has been approved for a Service Animal and also intends to live on campus, all of the student’s roommate(s) or suitemate(s) will be notified to make them aware of the approval, and notify them that the approved animal will be sharing the residence with them. The notification will be limited to communication about the animal’s presence, and there will be no disclosure of the student’s specific disability. Disability Services and Residence Life staff will collaborate, as necessary, to resolve conflicts related to a Service Animal. Conflicts between Service Animals and others’ allergies, phobias, etc. will be addressed on a case-by-case basis (e.g., relocation to another University housing location).
  • The requested Service Animal accommodation will be denied if:
    • The animal is out of control and the Owner of the Service Animal does not take effective action to control it;
    • The animal is not housebroken (i.e., trained so that the animal controls its waste elimination); or
    • The animal poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others that cannot be eliminated or reduced to an acceptable level by a reasonable modification to other policies, practices, and procedures.
  • Students whose request for a Service Animal through this process is not granted will have the opportunity to appeal such decisions by contacting the Vice President for Student Life, verbally or in writing.

Procedures to have Assistance Animals in University Housing

    • Students with disabilities desiring to use an Assistance Animal in University housing must formally register with the Office of Disability Services and request the use of an Assistance Animal as an accommodation. Students seeking to use an Assistance Animal in University housing are asked to make their requests according to the following deadline: March 1 for the upcoming academic year. Students are encouraged to meet with the Director of Disability Services prior to the Room Selection Process.
    • Upon receipt of a request for the use of an Assistance Animal, the Director of Disability Services will schedule an appointment with the student to discuss the accommodation request, either in person or by telephone.
    • The Director of Disability Services will ask at the appointment with the student requesting the accommodation:
      • Whether the student seeking to use and live with the animal has a disability; and
      • Whether the student making the request has a disability-related need for the Assistance Animal.
    • If the answers to these two questions are “no,” then the accommodation request may be denied.
    • If the answers to these two questions are “yes,” then the request may be granted for all areas of the student’s dormitory where persons are normally allowed to go, unless doing so would impose an undue financial and administrative burden or would fundamentally alter the nature of the dormitory’s services.
    • The requested Assistance Animal accommodation will be denied if:
      • The specific Assistance Animal in question poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others that cannot be reduced or eliminated by another reasonable accommodation; or
      • The specific Assistance Animal in question would cause substantial physical damage to the property of others that cannot be reduced or eliminated by another reasonable accommodation.
    • If a student requesting an Assistance Animal accommodation has a disability that is not readily apparent or known to the University, the University may ask the student to submit reliable documentation of a disability and his or her disability-related need for an Assistance Animal. If the student’s disability is readily apparent or known to the University, but the disability-related need for the assistance is not, the University may ask the student to provide documentation of the disability related need for the Assistance Animal, but not documentation of his or her disability.
    • Upon approval of an Assistance Animal, the student’s roommate(s) or suitemate(s) will be notified (if applicable) to make them aware of the approval, and notify them that the approved animal will be sharing the residence with them. This notice will be limited to information about the animal’s presence: there will be no disclosure of the student’s disability. Disability Services and Residence Life staff will collaborate, as necessary, to resolve conflicts related to an Assistance Animal. Conflicts between Assistance Animals and others’ allergies, phobias, etc. will be addressed on a case-by-case basis (e.g., relocation to another University housing location). Students will be permitted to have no more than one Assistance Animal.
    • Students whose request for an Assistance Animal through this process is not granted will have the opportunity to appeal such decisions by contacting the Vice President for Student Life, verbally or in writing.

Assistance/Service Animal Owner Responsibilities

      • All approved animals must be free from disease and have a valid health clearance from a veterinarian to ensure the animal is in good health and suitable for living on campus. Vaccination records must be maintained and are subject to review on an annual basis.
      • The Owner of the Service Animal or Assistance Animal is responsible for ensuring that the approved animal does not impede with the routine activities and daily operations of the University or cause complications for students or staff attending and working there. Sensitivity to individuals with allergies and to those who fear animals is vital to ensure the peace of the campus community.
      • Approved animals must not be allowed to initiate contact/approach/sniff people, tables in eating areas, or personal properties of others.
      • Regardless of whether or not the Owner was with the approved animal, the Owner is financially and legally responsible for the actions of an approved animal such as bodily injury or property damage, including but not limited to, any replacement of furniture, carpet, or wall layering, etc. Susquehanna University shall have the right to bill the student for necessary repair and/or replacement costs.
      • Approved animals must not cause undue financial burden to SU. All functions of using approved animals, including animal training or re-training, independent travel, animal food purchasing and maintenance, grooming, veterinarian care, and hygiene work is considered a personal aid or service and is the full responsibility of the individual with the disability.
      • The owner must notify Director of Disability Services in writing if the approved animal is no longer necessary as an approved animal or is no longer in University housing. To replace an approved animal the owner must submit a new request for another animal.
      • The Owner of an Assistance Animal’s residence (which may extend beyond the Owner’s private residential area) may be inspected for fleas, ticks, or other pests once per semester or as needed. If fleas, ticks, or other pests are detected through inspection, the affected areas will be treated using a Susquehanna University approved pest control service. The student will be billed for the expense of any pest treatment above and beyond normal required pest management in University housing, if it is determined that the reason for the extra expense is the result of the Assistance Animal.
      • Approved animals may not be bathed in the shower rooms, bathtubs, or sinks of the residence halls, and animal food must be kept in a covered storage container.
      • Service Animals may travel freely with their owner throughout the University. Assistance Animals must be contained within the privately assigned residential area (room, suite, apartment) at all times, except when transported outside the private residential area in an animal carrier or controlled by leash or harness. Animals must not be tethered to a stationary fixture, or left unattended outside of a residential room on campus.
      • All animals left unattended in a room must be crated or caged. Except in the case of an extreme emergency, approved animals may not be left overnight in University Housing to be cared for by anyone other than the Owner of the Assistance Animal. Animals must be taken with the Owner if they leave campus for a prolonged time.
      • Residence Life has the ability to relocate the Owner of an Assistance Animal and the Assistance Animal as necessary.
      • The Owner of an Assistance Animal must abide by all other residential policies.
      • The Owner of an Assistance Animal or Service Animal is responsible for ensuring the cleanup of the animal's waste and must toilet the animal in areas designated by the college consistent with the reasonable capacity of the Owner. Animal feces must be disposed of as instructed by facilities management.
      • Should the approved animal be removed from University housing for any reason, the owner is expected to satisfy their housing obligations.
      • All approved animals must be treated humanely. Any reports of mistreatment may result in immediate removal of the animal from the university.
      • Any violation of the above rules may result in re-evaluation of request to have the Service Animal on campus or to the Assistance Animal in University housing. If it is determined that the animal can no longer be permitted on campus, the removal of the animal will be the responsibility of the owner. Violations of the Owner Responsibilities may be reviewed through the University Student Conduct System. An Owner whose conduct is reviewed through one of these procedures will be given all of the rights of the University process and appeal rights as set forth in the Code of Student Conduct.

Guidelines for Faculty, Staff, Students, and Other Members of the University Community

Members of the Susquehanna University community are required to abide by the following practices:

        • Allow approved Service Animals to accompany its owner at all times and in all areas of campus, except where animals may present a health or safety risk.
        • Allow approved Assistance Animals to provide the necessary support to its Owner in the residence where the Owner abides.
        • Do not touch an approved Service or Assistance Animal unless invited to do so by the Owner of the animal.
        • Do not feed approved Service or Assistance Animals, unless you are the Owner.
        • Do not purposefully startle an approved Service or Assistance Animal.
        • Do not separate or try to separate an Owner from their approved Service or Assistance Animal.
        • Do not request details about a person’s disabilities. The nature of a person’s disability is a private matter.

INCLEMENT WEATHER POLICY

Policy Summary

This policy shall establish the process for determining when to close the university and/or cancel classes due to inclement weather, how to communicate notice of closings, and timekeeping and employee compensation issues during closings.

Policy

The university will not be closed except in extraordinarily dangerous weather. When the university is open, all administrative offices will be open and all classes will meet unless the instructor is unable to get to class.

In the case of extraordinarily dangerous weather conditions, the president or his designee will close the university and communicate the closing via the following:

          • An announcement in the News Extras section of MySU
          • The home page of the SU website

ACADEMIC LIFE POLICIES

The primary source of academic information and regulations can be found in the Course Catalog. Students are expected to become familiar with the contents of the Catalog and to use it as an academic guide.

Some important academic policies are summarized below. For full text of policies, see the Course Catalog.

To receive the full benefit of a Susquehanna education, each student has these basic responsibilities:

          • Attend class regularly.
          • Get to know your instructors.
          • Meet regularly with your advisor to ensure you're making steady progress toward graduation.
          • Understand and follow university policies outlined in the Course Catalog and the Student Handbook.

Attendance

When a student has missed a week of a particular course during the semester, the instructor may warn the student in writing of the consequences of additional absences. When a student has missed two weeks of a particular course (one week for a seven-week course), the instructor may award a grade of F. As with any grade, appeal may be made through normal channels if gross unfairness or illegal discrimination is alleged.

Grades and Grading

If you believe you received an incorrect final course grade, talk to the instructor. Any grade conflict that cannot be resolved between the faculty member and the student shall be referred to the department head. If the conflict cannot be resolved at the departmental level, the issue may be referred to the dean of the school.

Note that final course grades are changed only in the event of error, and changes require authorization by the instructor and approval by the dean of the appropriate school. All grade changes must be submitted within one month from the end of the semester in which the grade is assigned. A student may not raise a final grade by doing additional assignments after the course has concluded or by revising previously submitted assignments.

Services for Students with Disabilities

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the university makes efforts to provide reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. To be considered for disability accommodations, students should submit appropriate documentation of the condition to the Office of Disability Services. Full information about the required documentation and steps for obtaining accommodations is discussed in the disabilities policy available on the Disability Services web page.

Residence Requirement

To fulfill graduation requirements, baccalaureate degree-seeking students must take at least 65 semester hours of their total coursework in residence or in approved off-campus programs, including:

            • 24 of the final 32 semester hours
            • The major capstone course and any other course a major program may designate.
            • At least half the courses applied to a student's major or minor.

The faculty, or the Residence Waiver Committee as its designee, must approve any variation from this policy.

Leave of Absence

A student may take a leave of absence (LOA) for personal, medical or financial reasons, or for study at other institutions with which Susquehanna has no formal cooperative program. To arrange a leave of absence for non-med, contact the Registrar's Office.

Students must notify the Registrar's Office before the semester they intend to return. Please note:

            • Students on academic warning or academic probation upon taking an LOA must also be formally reinstated by the Academic Standing Committee.
            • Students who take a medical leave of absence (described below) must receive approval from the Dean of Academic Achievement to return.
            • A student who takes a leave of absence from the university for more than one year is subject to any changes made in the academic program requirements during that time. A student who left the university for one year or less may fulfill either the original major and distributional requirements or the revised requirements.

Withdrawal from the University

To be eligible for any refunds under the schedule established by Student Financial Services, students must complete the formal withdrawal form available from the Registrar's Office—departure from campus does not constitute official withdrawal. Students who do not immediately notify the registrar of their intention to withdraw will lose all fees and deposits.

Medical Leave of Absence and Involuntary Health-Related Withdrawal Policy

            Policy Summary

Students may experience life situations, medical conditions or psychological conditions that significantly impair their ability to function successfully and safely in their role as a student. In these instances, a course reduction or time away from the University for treatment and recovery can often restore functioning to a level that will enable a return to the University. The decision to withdraw from a course or leave the University for medical reasons may happen at any time in the semester, independently of otherwise posted withdrawal deadlines. A medical leave, whether voluntary, involuntary, or temporary may be approved when criteria for the leave are met.

            Reasons for the Policy

When a student becomes impaired to the extent of needing a medical leave of absence (MLOA), this impairment oftentimes impacts the larger community.

There are usually significant advantages to requesting an MLOA. These include:

            • Students may typically request an MLOA after normal withdrawal deadlines have passed.
            • Students who take an approved MLOA will receive a W for their courses, which will not impact cumulative GPA.
            • An MLOA may reduce the negative impact on financial aid.
            • For students with tuition reimbursement insurance, an MLOA generally qualifies a student for benefits. (Students who think they may need to take a MLOA during the course of the coming semester may wish to consider purchasing tuition reimbursement insurance before that semester begins.)
            • For international students, an MLOA may provide a way to remain in the USA while maintaining a legal status.
            Definitions/Glossary
            • Medical leave of absence (MLOA): a voluntary withdrawal from the University in order to improve mental or physical health, which has been supported by a medical or mental health provider and approved by the Dean of Academic Achievement.
            • Medical course load reduction: a voluntary course load reduction after published deadlines for withdrawing from courses, which is granted in order to improve mental or physical health.
            • Voluntary interim emergency leave: a temporary leave from the University to accommodate a medical or mental health emergency.
            • Involuntary health-related withdrawal: an involuntary withdrawal from the University imposed on the student by the University as a result of behavior due to medical or mental health conditions that meet the standards for such withdrawal, as defined below.
            • Direct threat: a significant risk to the health or safety of others that cannot be eliminated by the provision of auxiliary aids or services or by a modification of policies, practices, or procedures.
            • Significant Risk: Behavior that has a high probability of substantial harm to the University community, given information concerning the behavior that is available at the time of consideration.
            • Substantial Disruption: Behavior that continually and considerably interferes with other students’ participation in academic, extracurricular, housing/residence life, employment, or other university-related activities.
            Policy

A medical leave, whether voluntary, involuntary, or temporary will be approved when criteria for the leave are met. Students placed on such leave must leave campus as directed by the Dean of Academic Achievement or a designee. If accommodations are required upon a student’s re-enrollment those will be reviewed by the Dean of Academic Achievement in consultation with appropriate administrators in Health, Counseling, and/or Disability Services. If no accommodations are required, students will be expected to follow the procedures described below in order to re-enroll.

            Medical Leave of Absence (MLOA) or Medical Course Load Reduction

All requests for an MLOA or medical course load reduction require the recommendation of a health care provider. An MLOA or medical course load reduction may be granted when a student experiences serious medical or psychological problems, while enrolled as a student, which impact that student's ability to function effectively, including ability to attend class, cognitive functioning, or ability to complete work. Students who determine a need for an MLOA between semesters should go through regular withdrawal procedures through the Registrar's Office.

The process of readmission is described in the MLOA approval letter. Students are strongly encouraged to follow the recommendations indicated in the approval letter from the Dean of Academic Achievement to help facilitate their return. In addition, students who are approved for an MLOA are generally expected to spend at least three months to one full semester away from the University to focus on treatment and recovery from the matter(s) that precipitated the MLOA before readmission will be approved. Please note, the decision of the University to support re-enrollment will be made on a case-by-case basis by the Dean of Academic Achievement in consultation with the Dean of Health & Wellness. To allow time for processing requests for readmission, previously enrolled students must submit all required materials by the deadline for the semester they intend to return, as follows:

            • Fall Semester: June 15
            • Spring Semester: November 15
            • Summer Semester: March 15
            Involuntary Health-Related Withdrawal

In order to create a safe and healthy learning environment and to ensure the well-being of all student and employees, Susquehanna University may initiate an Involuntary Health-Related Withdrawal (IHRW) of a student. The IHRW is enacted if it is determined that, due to the student’s medical or mental health condition, the student poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others or the student’s, the student’s behavior is a substantial disruption to the University community and/or the student has allegedly violated the student code of conduct and upon a preliminary investigation it is reasonably believed that the alleged misconduct was involuntary or the student lacks the capacity to comprehend the nature of the act or to participate in the disciplinary process. In determining whether a student meets the criteria for a IHRW, the University’s Concern Assessment Response Evaluation (CARE) Team will make an individualized assessment, based on reasonable judgment that relies on current medical information and the best available objective evidence, to ascertain the nature, duration, and severity of the risk; the probability that the potential injury will actually occur; and whether reasonable modifications of policies, practices, or procedures or the provision of auxiliary aids or services will mitigate the risk.

            Voluntary interim emergency leave

If a student has a critical incident or life event that will requires them to leave the University temporarily but does met the criteria for a Medical Leave of Absence (MLOA), a Voluntary Interim Emergency Leave (VIEL) might be appropriate. Unlike an MLOA, a VIEL may be implemented immediately when the Dean of Academic Achievement or designee determines that the student’s situation necessitates a brief absence from the University.

            Right to Appeal

A student may appeal any of the following decisions rendered under this policy:

            • An Involuntary Health-Related Withdrawal from the University and/or from University housing recommended by the CARE team,
            • The conditions recommended by the CARE Team in order for the student to remain enrolled and/or continue living in University housing,
            • A denial of the student's request for reenrollment,
            • The conditions specified by the CARE Team for reenrollment in the event of an Involuntary Health-Related Withdrawal, or
            • An Involuntary Health-Related Withdrawal based on the student's failure to comply with this policy.

The appeal must be based on a material procedural error and/or the student’s receipt of relevant new information. The Vice President of Student Life will serve as the appeal officer.

            Transcripts

A student who is approved for a voluntary or involuntary withdrawal or leave of absence will be given a "W" grade in courses from with they have withdrawn. An administrative hold will be placed on the student's academic record to prevent any unauthorized reenrollment by the student.

            Refunds

Refunds of tuition and meal plan payments will be made in accordance with applicable University policies and procedures.

ACADEMIC HONESTY

Susquehanna recognizes honesty and integrity as being necessary to the academic function of the university. A violation involves cheating, plagiarism, academic negligence or dishonesty.

Plagiarism results when students neglect to acknowledge in footnotes, endnotes or other forms of documentation their use of the words and ideas of others. The failure to acknowledge and properly document your use of sources and materials, even if unintentional or innocent, amounts to representing as your own the work of someone else. When the words of another are used in student work, they must be both cited in some form of documentation, such as a footnote, and placed in quotation marks.

University Records

Students and organizations shall complete university records honestly. Neither shall alter nor cause to be altered any records, forms or documents used by the university, nor shall knowingly misuse such documents. Neither shall hinder nor mislead, or attempt to hinder or mislead, a university official in the performance of his or her duty by providing false or misleading information.

Jurisdiction

  • An instructor has original jurisdiction for all first-time offenses involving cheating or plagiarism on tests, quizzes, papers, exams and all class assignments.
  • The Academic Honesty Judicial Board (AHJB) shall have appellate jurisdiction for any case in which the instructor has original jurisdiction.
  • The AHJB shall have original jurisdiction in all repeat offenses of academic dishonesty and in all cases where suspension/expulsion is a potential sanction.
  • When the AHJB is not in session, all cases will be adjudicated through an administrative resolution

Procedure when the faculty member has original jurisdiction

  • Prior to determining responsibility, the instructor will contact the Dean of Academic Achievement to check the records to determine whether the incident is a repeat offense. If the student has a prior record of academic dishonesty, the case will be referred to the AHJB.
  • The instructor shall make every effort to confer with the student before assessing responsibility.
  • The instructor will turn in a grade of “N” (no grade) for any individual whose case is unresolved by the time final grades are due.
  • If the student is found responsible for violating the academic honesty policy, the instructor shall determine the sanction in consultation with the academic department head.
  • The instructor shall provide written notification to the student and Dean of Academic Achievement of the sanction imposed.
  • The student will have seven days from the date of receiving the written notice of the sanction to appeal the decision to the AHJB. Appeals can only be made on the grounds of new evidence to present, denial of a fair hearing or an unduly harsh sanction.

Academic Honesty Judicial Board

  • Membership
    • The AHJB shall be composed of four students from the Conduct Board and three faculty members elected by the faculty.
    • The students shall serve for a term of one year with the opportunity to serve additional terms.
    • The faculty shall be elected for three-year terms. The initial elections shall be all three members for one-, two- and three-year terms. Subsequently, one faculty member will be elected each year for a three-year term.
    • The Dean of Academic Achievement shall serve as an ex officio, non-voting member and record keeper of the AHJB.
  • Procedures
    • The Respondent is entitled to a minimum of two days’ notice of a hearing, a statement of the charges and a fair hearing.
    • Hearings shall be closed.
    • The instructor filing the charges will present the case at the hearing. Witnesses may be called for additional information.
    • The Respondent will present his or her case and may call witnesses.
    • The Respondent and instructor will be notified in writing of the decision of the AHJB.
  • Appeals of AHJB Decisions
    • Appeals of AHJB decisions can only be made on the grounds of new evidence to present, denial of a fair hearing or unduly harsh sanction.
    • Appeals must be made within seven days of the date of notification of the AHJB's decision.
    • Depending on the case, the Dean of the School of Arts & Sciences or the Dean of the Sigmund Weis School of Business shall serve as the appeals officer.
    • Final appeal jurisdiction in any case rests with the Provost of the University.
  • Sanction Guidelines for Academic Dishonesty

Violation Corresponding maximum sanction Cheating or plagiarism on tests, quizzes, exams, papers or any class assignment Failure in course Unauthorized possession of tests, examinations or papers Expulsion The physical theft, duplication, unauthorized distribution or sale of tests, examinations or papers Expulsion Tampering with grades or grade books/attempting to alter in any way grades assigned by instructor Expulsion Other acts of academic dishonesty Expulsion

Established by the Faculty and the Student Government Association, December 1981. Last Revised July 2003.

Audio and video recording

Advance, written permission is required in order to record course materials such as class lectures, discussions, or presentations. When granted, permission to record course materials is subject to the limitations set forth in this policy. Violations of this policy may constitute copyright infringement in violation of federal and state law. Additionally, violations of this policy may be subject to University disciplinary action according to the policies governing the Academic Honesty Judicial Board.

Course materials are defined as lectures, lecture notes, outlines, PowerPoint presentations, readings, or other content made available to students by the instructor or presenter, or through any University online system. Recording is defined as a video or audio replication or photographic image recorded on devices including, but not limited to, audio recorders, video recorders, cell phones, smartphones, tablets, digital cameras, media players, computers, or other devices that record images or sound.

Recording of course materials is prohibited unless advance written permission is obtained from the class instructor and any guest presenter(s). An instructor may provide such permission to an entire class as part of the course syllabus or other written description of a course.

Students who require recording or other adaptations of course materials as a reasonable accommodation for a disability should contact the Office of Disability Services in advance of the class in order to obtain permission for the recording.

In the event permission to record course materials is granted, the instructor must notify all students, speakers and other class attendees in advance that recording may occur. Every effort should be made to protect the confidentiality of a student with a disability who is being granted an accommodation, i.e. the instructor will not name the student who is doing the recording when it is due to a disability accommodation.

Permission to allow the recording of course materials is not a transfer of any copyrights in the recording or related course materials. Such recordings and materials may be used only for individual or group study with other students enrolled in the same class, and may not be reproduced, transferred, distributed, sold, traded, or displayed in any public or commercial manner.

Students must destroy recordings at the end of the semester in which they are enrolled in the class or sequence of courses

PARENTAL NOTIFICATION POLICY

Introduction

The purpose of this policy is to clarify the circumstances and procedures under which the university may notify parents regarding information about a student without the consent of the student.

University Philosophy Regarding the Role of Parents and Their Child’s Education

(Revised April 2013)

Susquehanna University believes parents should have a role in their children's education. For this reason, we believe it is appropriate to partner with parents so that together we can help students become independent thinkers and decision makers.

Our primary relationship is with students. We prepare them for successful lives after graduation, guide them toward good decisions and help them learn from the outcomes of those decisions. We expect students to take primary responsibility for their education. They are accountable for fulfilling their academic requirements, meeting their financial obligations and adhering to the university's expectations for appropriate conduct.

Because parents and other family members know their students well, they can play an important role in supporting and advising students during these critical years. Parents can encourage and support students' development by discussing with them their needs, helping them become self-advocates and directing them toward the appropriate resources.

Over the course of students' undergraduate years, parents develop valuable insights about the Susquehanna experience. We encourage them to share their comments, questions and opinions with us. To help keep parents informed, we will use a variety of university publications, online communities and our Web site to communicate about university developments, policies and expectations. Together, the university and parents can support the learning and success of our students.

Federal Law Regarding Disclosure of Educational Records

The right of access to information in a student’s educational records is governed by a federal law known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”). The right of access to other information, such as medical or counseling records, is governed by applicable state or federal law. As a general rule, students attending a college or university, regardless of age, have the right under FERPA to control disclosure of information from their educational records. FERPA permits colleges and universities to make certain exceptions to this general rule and allows disclosure of certain directory information from a student’s educational records without obtaining the student’s prior consent. Whenever reasonably possible, a Student Life administrator will confer with a student before parents are notified. A student may also request that any of this information not be released by writing to the Vice President of Student Life. However, the Vice President may deny this request and parental notification may be made without consultation with the student. This includes but is not limited to instances of a medical emergency or when, at the discretion of the Vice President, waiting may cause harm to a student or the community.

Circumstances When Parental Notification May Occur

In general, university staff may notify parents when they have knowledge of circumstances adversely affecting a student. A Student Life administrator, in consultation with appropriate staff, will determine when parental notification will occur. These situations include:

Academic Issues

Parents/guardians may be notified when a student is at risk of academic suspension, when a student withdraws from the university for any reason and when the academic standing of a dependent student may negatively impact financial aid.

Medical and Mental Health

Health Center and Counseling Center staff are prohibited by law from sharing detailed information regarding complaints or diagnoses, and even attendance at the Health Center or Counseling Center, without express consent from the student. However, staff will encourage students to discuss serious medical and mental health issues with parents or guardians. Counseling Center and Health Center staffs are permitted to violate confidentiality in the case of imminent danger, to the extent that it is necessary to protect the student or others threatened by the student.

  • Parents/legal guardians of dependent students may be notified by a Student Life administrator in the event of hospitalization for life-threatening or other serious illness, including illnesses that would require multiple-day stays, when the hospital does not notify parents.
  • A Student Life administrator may notify the parents or legal guardians of a dependent student in connection with a serious injury or health or safety emergency when deemed necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other Individuals.
  • A Student Life administrator may notify parents/legal guardians of a dependent student when they have knowledge of a hospital visit for suspected alcohol poisoning.

In some instances we need parents to travel to Selinsgrove to assist in resolving challenges, especially medical and mental health issues. We expect that parents will respond affirmatively, as such requests are not made without thorough consideration and compelling need.

Student Conduct Issues

Parents/guardians of dependent students may be notified by the university of charges brought against a student that could result in loss of housing, suspension, expulsion or loss of the privilege of participation in commencement ceremonies. Parents will be notified if a student is found responsible for a violation and the sanction includes loss of housing, suspension, expulsion or loss of privilege of participation in commencement exercises.

Parents/guardians of dependent students may be notified by the university if a student is found responsible for a violation of the University Alcohol or Drug Policies. (Refer to the Code of Student Conduct.)

Encouraging Students to Take Responsibility for Parental Notification

At the point at which it is determined that parental notification is permitted under the provisions of this policy, the student may be given 24 hours to make the initial contact with the parents or legal guardians prior to the university notifying the parents or legal guardians. In the event of parental divorce or separation, the student may designate the parent to be contacted.

ANTI-HARASSMENT AND NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY

Policy Summary

Central to the mission of Susquehanna University is the establishment and maintenance of an environment in which the dignity and worth of all individuals within the institutional community are respected. Therefore, it is the responsibility of each person on campus to respect the personal dignity of others and to demonstrate a basic spirit that precludes harassment and discrimination. While the university is committed to freedom of thought, discourse, and speech, and the attainment of the highest quality of educational and academic pursuits, the university is compelled to establish this policy on behaviors that would interfere with these freedoms.

Definitions/Glossary

The following definitions are university-wide definitions and will be used as a reference for all cases involving harassment and discrimination including those addressed in the Student Code of Conduct referenced as sexual assault or sexual harassment:

  • Protected Characteristics – Includes race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability status, genetic information, veterans’ status, ethnic origin, ancestry, social class, marital and parental status, geography, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or any other basis protected by applicable federal, state or local laws.
  • Discrimination – Conduct directed at an individual because of his or her Protected Characteristic(s) and that subjects the individual to different treatment so as to interfere with or limit the ability of the individual to participate in, or benefit from, the services, activities, or privileges provided by the university, or otherwise adversely affects the individual's employment or education.
  • Harassment – Verbal or physical conduct that is directed at an individual because of his or her Protected Characteristic(s), and that is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or persistent so as to have the purpose or effect of creating a hostile work or educational environment.
  • Harassment Based on Protected Characteristics - Harassment based on Protected Characteristics is a form of prohibited discrimination. Harassment often takes the form of verbal statements regarding an individual’s Protected Characteristics, such as epithets, derogatory comments or slurs, profanity, gestures, innuendo, jokes, or forms of address. Harassment can also take the form of other adverse conduct motivated by a person’s Protected Characteristics, such as teasing or tricks, physical abuse or bullying.
  • Sexual Harassment is any unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature, including sexual assault and other forms of sexual misconduct, including but not limited to when:
    • Submission to or rejection of such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or educational advancement, or evaluation; or
    • Submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for employment or educational advancement, or evaluation; or
    • Such conduct, of a severe and pervasive manner, has the purpose or effect of interfering with an individual's work performance or educational experience, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work/educational environment.
    • Unwelcome behavior is if the individual did not solicit or invite conduct, and particularly if he or she indicates that s/he finds the conduct undesirable or offensive. Acquiescence or failure to complain does not mean that the conduct is welcome.

Such harassment, and all forms of sexual discrimination, are specifically prohibited not only by this policy, but also by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

Intent vs. Impact - It is the impact of the behavior, not the intent of the person who exhibited the behavior that determines whether or not sexual harassment has occurred. According to the law, actual intent is irrelevant. Courts have found a hostile environment exists if the victim believes the environment to be abusive and a reasonable person would find it to be an abusive environment.

  • Racial Harassment is any verbal or physical conduct that is directed at an individual because of his or her race, color, national origin or ethnicity, and that is sufficiently severe or pervasive so as to have the effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational environment, which unreasonably interferes with work or educational performance, or negatively affects an individual's employment or educational opportunities. Such harassment is prohibited.
  • Gender Identity Harassment is any verbal or physical conduct that is directed at an individual because of his or her gender identity, the degree to which a person identifies as male, female, or some combination, and that is sufficiently severe or pervasive so as to have the effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational environment which unreasonably interferes with work or educational performance, or negatively affects an individual's employment or educational opportunities. Such harassment is prohibited.
  • Sexual Orientation Harassment is any verbal or physical conduct that is directed at an individual because of his or her sexual orientation, and that is sufficiently severe or pervasive so as to have the effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational environment, which unreasonably interferes with work or educational performance, or negatively affects an individual's employment or educational opportunities. Such harassment is prohibited.
  • Disability Harassment is any verbal or physical conduct or a pattern of a lack of reasonable accommodation that is directed at an individual because of his or her mental or physical impairment, and that is sufficiently severe or pervasive so as to have the effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational environment which unreasonably interferes with work or educational performance, or negatively affects an individual's employment or educational opportunities. Such harassment is prohibited.
  • Religious Harassment is any verbal or physical conduct that is directed at an individual because of his or her religion and/or religious beliefs pertaining to religion and that is sufficiently severe or pervasive as to have the effect of creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational environment, which unreasonably interferes with work or educational performance, or negatively affects an individual's employment or educational opportunities. Such harassment is prohibited.

This Policy Applies to all full-time, part-time and temporary employees

Persons (faculty, staff or students) wishing to bring a charge against a student should contact the Dean of Students and Campus Life. The responding student(s) will be addressed through the student conduct system via the Code of Student Conduct.

Policy

Harassment or discrimination in any context is reprehensible, but is of particular concern to an academic community in which students, faculty and staff must rely on bonds of intellectual trust and dependence. Therefore, harassment and discrimination will not be tolerated. Specifically, the university expressly prohibits any form of harassment of or discrimination against its employees in categories protected by law, including harassment or discrimination based on: race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability status, genetic information or veterans’ status. In addition, the university also prohibits any form of harassment of or discrimination against its employees based on ethnic origin, ancestry, social class, marital and parental status, geography, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or any other basis protected by applicable federal, state or local laws (collectively, “Protected Characteristics”). Any individual engaging in such discrimination or harassment will be subject to the full range of institutional disciplinary actions, up to and including termination from the university, and may also face civil and/or criminal legal liability.

Harassment/Discrimination Grievance Procedures Description of Process

Employees wishing to make a complaint should contact, verbally or in writing, the Director of Human Resources, who will explain the process and answer any questions.

Jennifer Bucher

Director of Human Resources First Floor, Selinsgrove Hall 514 University Avenue

Selinsgrove, PA 17870

570-372—4157

bucherjennifer@susqu.edu

Informal Complaint Resolution

The purpose of the informal complaint resolution is to encourage the reporting of complaints concerning harassment or discrimination and to facilitate satisfactory resolution of the complaint without undue anxiety and provocation for the parties involved. An employee making a harassment or discrimination complaint does not have to speak first with their supervisor or the person against whom the allegation has been made. However, they are encouraged to do so with the assistance of his or her peer supporter (who may be a university employee) in the presence of the Director of Human Resources.

If a complainant desires, when filing a complaint they may be accompanied by another university employee who may advise and assist the complainant throughout the resolution process. The peer supporter must be an individual from within the university community and can include, but is not limited to, a faculty or staff member, or a Human Resources representative.

The complainant (and the peer supporter) will discuss the complaint with the person against whom the allegation has been made in the presence of the Director of Human Resources in order to reach resolution of the complaint. (In the event that the person against whom the allegation has been made should be from the Director of Human Resources, the complainant will discuss the complaint in the presence of the Vice President for Finance and Administration or the Provost). Although encouraged, there is no obligation on the part of the complainant or the person against whom the allegation has been made to participate in the informal resolution process. If the complaint cannot be resolved informally, or step one is bypassed, the complainant may file a formal complaint. Additionally, informal resolution will not be used in cases alleging any form of sexual assault or other sexual violence.

If a complainant so desires, they may waive the informal resolution process and proceed directly to a formal investigation. The Office of Human Resources is designated as the office of referral for information and advice, unless the complaint is against a member of that office. In that case, the complainant should contact the Vice President for Finance and Administration or the Provost.

Personal legal counsel for either party may not be present during either informal or formal complaint resolution.

Formal Complaint Resolution

If the complaint cannot be resolved informally, or the informal process is bypassed, the complainant may file a formal written complaint. Formal complaints will be investigated and resolved in accordance with the procedures outlined below.

Complaints against a university employee - Complaints against a university employee are filed with the Director of Human Resources, which is responsible for initiating the formal resolution process. The Director of Human Resources or designee will conduct an investigation meeting or meetings.

In the event that the person against whom the allegation has been made is a Vice-President, the Office of the President will make a final determination. Should the person against whom the allegation has been made be from the Human Resources Office, the Vice President for Finance and Administration will investigate and make a final determination.

Individual investigation meetings will be conducted by the Director of Human Resources with both the complainant, the person against whom the allegation has been made, (with their respective peer supporter if they so desire), and any witnesses who could corroborate or clarify the facts in question.

Investigation meeting(s) will commence within ten working days of receipt of written complaint.

The Director of Human Resources will then forward her or his report to the supervising vice-president of the person against whom the allegation has been made, or in the case of faculty, to the provost for review and resolution along with the evidence gathered during the investigation meeting(s). Any formal action to be taken against a party as a result of the factual findings in the submitted report will be taken in accordance with the applicable policy.

Protection of Both Parties

Notice. When the formal investigation process has begun with the filing of a written complaint, copies of the complaint will be forwarded to the person against whom the allegation has been made. If the allegations are not substantiated, the person against whom the allegation has been made will be notified.

Abuse of Reporting. False and malicious accusations of harassment or discrimination will not be tolerated and those individuals making them will be subject to university sanctions.

Retaliatory Actions. Retaliation by the person against whom the allegation has been made or any other individual against the complainant as a result of filing a harassment or discrimination complaint, or against any individual participating in the investigation of such a complaint, will not be tolerated and the individual will also be subject to university sanctions. Reasonable action will be taken to assure the complainant and those involved with an investigation on his or her behalf will suffer no retaliation from the person against whom the allegation has been made or others within the university.

Suspension from Employment. In certain circumstances to protect the complainant or to prevent harm to others, the vice-president, or in a case involving a faculty member, the provost may at any time during the complaint process suspend the person against whom the allegation has been made from his or her primary duties and responsibilities until the matter is resolved.

Failure to cooperate with investigation. If the person against whom the allegation has been made elects not to cooperate with the investigation, the Director of Human Resources will complete the report based on the information in his or her possession.

Confidentiality and Completed Report. During the complaint process, the university will make every effort to ensure confidentiality. Please note that confidentiality cannot be guaranteed. Both individuals will be fully informed of the steps taken during the course of the complaint procedures by the administrator who conducts the investigation. In addition, both parties will be informed within ten working days of the completed report, whether the report has been forwarded to the appropriate vice president and the president. A record of the complaint will be located in a file separate from the general personnel file of the complainant and the accused.

Unfounded Report. If the matter is determined as unfounded after the conclusion of an investigation by the Director of Human Resources, then the Office of the President or the individual's supervising vice-president will communicate findings to the complainant and the matter will be deemed closed.

Notification to Complainant and Respondent. Within ten (10) working days of the conclusion of the investigatory process and a decision by the president or appropriate vice president, the complainant and respondent will be notified whether the allegation was judged to be founded or not founded. If founded, specific disciplinary actions will not be discussed to maintain confidentiality.

Sanctions

In all instances, the president or supervising vice president retains the sole power and discretion to take formal disciplinary action against an employee. Individuals who are found to have violated this policy will be subject to disciplinary actions as set forth by Board of Trustees Policy, University Policy or Faculty Handbook. Such action could include, but is not limited to, an informal oral reprimand, a written reprimand or other disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment.

Right of Appeal by Employees

A three-member President's Appeal Board will be appointed as needed by the Office of the President. The appeal board will be comprised of a faculty member, an administrator and an hourly staff member. The complainant and the person against whom the allegation has been made will be entitled to one written appeal of any decision rendered. Appeals must be based only on new evidence (not available during the investigation) or procedural error. In preparation of the appeal, both the accused and the complainant will have normal access to their file. Such appeal will be heard by the President's Appeal Board, which will forward its recommendation to the president. Appeals will be filed no later than ten days after the receipt of a report. All faculty appeals will be done in accordance with the Faculty Handbook. In addition to these complaint procedures, individuals may pursue other civil and legal options such as the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or the Office of Civil Rights.

These Susquehanna University harassment/discrimination procedures set forth are not intended to interfere with any legal rights under the statutes of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania or the United States of America.

Time Frame

In order to give the complainant time to finish a particular job assignment, an evaluation period or any other similar reason, the complainant may file a formal complaint of harassment or discrimination up to one hundred and eighty days following the alleged incident of harassment or discrimination.

Formal complaints filed within this period will be investigated even though the complainant has terminated her or his association with the university. Original Policy: 4/23/2010; Most recently revised 1/1/2016

RESIDENCE LIFE & COMMUNITY LIVING POLICIES

Community Living

As a residential liberal arts campus we encourage all students and staff to actively work to foster a sense of community in the residence halls and across campus. We ground our beliefs of community in Ernest Boyer’s Six Principles of Community. We believe that each community member is responsible for creating a community in which individuals strive to understand others; respect differences; create a culturally inclusive environment; and above all, celebrate the multiplicity of our lived experiences. The Residence Life staff is committed to the Statement on Ethical Living and to the creation of an ethos of shared community.

Residence Life

Residence Life provides an environment that supports the institution’s mission. More than residential facilities, the residential environment cultivates academic success, community, personal growth, and engagement for all residents. The residential program asks students to consider individual rights and their responsibility to community, ethical decision making, and the standards by which all agree to live and respond to others. Developing civility, learning about individual differences, and caring for self, the facility and others in the community are some of the foundational goals of residential living at the University.

Housing Based on Class Year

First year students live together in one of four residence halls: Smith, Reed, Aikens, and Scholars House. The second-year experience is focused in North, Seibert, West Hall, Sassafras, Hassinger, and GO House. Students in the junior and senior year have a variety of types of facilities to choose from but students primarily live in houses on the Avenue, the 18th Street Commons, West Village, and Liberty Alley in more independent living communities.

The varied types of facilities have different goals to encourage the needs of the residents. Learning and living together with increasing amounts of self- governance better prepare students to enter the global community upon graduation.

Residency Policy

It is the policy of Susquehanna University to offer full, equal and non-discriminatory assistance to all students without regard to their race, color, religion, nationality, gender, gender identity, and sexual orientation in both placement in university residential facilities and in the furnishing of facilities.

All full-time undergraduate students are required to live in University housing except those who are: a) commuting from and residing full-time in the primary residence of their parents or guardians which is within 45 minutes driving distance of campus; or b) married or civilly unified and residing with spouse; or c) are a legal guardian of a child(ren) and residing with said child(ren), or d) over 23 years of age at the start of the academic year.

All campus housing includes both room and dining plan (a full meal plan) with the exception of Liberty Alley and 18th Street Commons units. Liberty Alley and 18th Street Commons residents are not automatically given a dining plan but may purchase one by indicating their choice of meal plan during the room selection process. . The university reserves the right to enforce any restrictions or regulations necessary for the general welfare of residents and/or the maintenance of its property.

In rare instances, students may be granted an exception from the Director of Residence Life to reside off campus. All students are required to complete a housing exemption form before the first semester they plan to live off-campus. If the exemption is granted, it is valid for their entire time at Susquehanna. If at any point a student needs on-campus housing, they should be in contact with the Office of Residence Life. Appeals to the Director’s decisions should go to the Dean of Students and Campus Life. If provided an exception, students are expected to adhere to all federal, state, and local laws as well as the Code of Student Conduct.

Early Arrival/Move-In

Returning Students may not move into the residence halls prior to their opening on the Sunday before classes begin for the fall or spring semester. First-Year and Transfer students move in the Thursday prior to classes starting in the Fall semester. Students are expected to leave campus for breaks 24 hours after their last exam. Exceptions are granted on a limited basis by contacting the Director of Residence Life.

Break/Vacation Housing

The residence halls close for Thanksgiving, winter and spring breaks as well as for the summer. Closing and opening dates and times can be found on the Residence Life mySU site. Students are expected to vacate the halls by the appointed closing time and return no earlier than the official reopening. The Office of Residence Life reserves the right to issue a daily rate charge to students who do not vacate the halls on time or return early from a break without permission.

Students may request an exception to remain in the residence halls over a break period. Request deadlines are a week to ten days prior to the break period. Exceptions may be granted and students will receive notification via their SU email account. During break housing periods, additional policies are in place so students staying over breaks are encouraged to read the application for exception as well as the approval email.

At the end of each semester, students are expected to leave within 24 hours of their last final exam unless their last exam occurs on the last day of finals. In this case, they must leave by the time the halls close. Extensions on assignments given by professors do not imply that a student may continue to live on campus during a break. The student is still responsible for making a formal request according to the application policies and deadlines located on mySU.

For health and safety purposes, before vacating the residence hall room for breaks, students must complete all tasks on the break checkout form including, but not limited to, emptying trash, closing all doors and windows, unplugging all electronics, and taking home all valuables. Students are responsible for acquiring this form from their Resident Assistant or Professional Staff member and posting it on the outside of their residence hall room door upon departure. The Office of Residence Life reserves the right to issue a $50.00 improper check out fee for items not completed on the checkout form.

The university reserves the right to close all residence halls during stated vacation periods. Personal belongings may remain in student rooms during the academic year break periods. The university, however, cannot be held liable directly or indirectly for loss of, or damage to, the personal property of individuals. All personal items must be removed from university premises at the end of a student's occupancy of a room. Any personal items found on university property after the conclusion of spring semester or a student’s occupancy will be discarded and the owner will be charged for the cost of removal. The university does not provide storage for personal belongings. It is good practice to leave a copy of the serial numbers of all expensive equipment at home and to purchase Student Personal Property insurance if a family homeowner’s policy does not extend to belongings on campus.

Room and Dining Agreement

As stated above, enrollment at Susquehanna University implies a binding room and dining agreement.

Termination of the room and/or dining agreement may be permitted for the following reasons: change of residence status to commuter or married student; absence from campus because of an internship or student teaching; semester-long study away program; a leave of absence; withdrawal from the university; completion of a degree program.

Termination of the agreement as stated above will cancel charges for the remaining semesters. No refund will be granted for partial semester occupancy.

The university reserves the right to void a room and dining agreement in the event a student's course load falls below the full-time credit requirement.

Any student is subject to dismissal from the university and/or the residence halls for prohibited conduct or violation of university regulations. The university reserves the right to terminate the housing agreement whenever the violation of regulations warrants such termination or whenever the room is vacated or the connection of the student with the university is terminated. Where the termination of the agreement results from disciplinary action no refund is allowed. The university also reserves the right to reassign the occupants or terminate an agreement when in the university's judgment it is in the best interest of the residential community.

Part time Students

Students who take below 12 credit hours per semester are considered part-time and need permission from the Director of Residence Life to live in on-campus housing.

Residence Life Staff

The Director, Assistant Director and Area Coordinators lead and manage the residence life program at Susquehanna University.

In addition to the professional staff, Resident Assistants are undergraduate student staff members responsible for establishing community that is conducive to learning. They are available to assist students with their social, personal or academic concerns. They are responsible for setting standards, reinforcing expectations and reporting alleged violations of Code of Student Conduct and University policy.

Senior Community Assistants are upper-class students who served successfully as Resident Assistants and are charged with building unity and spirit in a residential community. They engage residential communities in service, leadership, and educational programming based on student needs, and co-advise community councils. They are also responsible for setting standards, reinforcing expectations and reporting alleged violations of the Code of Student Conduct and University policy.

Community Assistants work in upper class living units and assist residents with neighborhood and community conflicts, provide resource referral, and facilitate independent living skill based programming. They are responsible for reinforcing expectations and reporting alleged violations of the Code of Student Conduct and other University policies.

Community Rounds

University officials, including student staff, make daily, routine rounds of the residence halls for the purposes of community development and being a consistent, accessible presence. They reserve the right to enter common area spaces in suites, apartments, townhouses, and houses to address safety and security concerns and to ensure compliance of university policies. Residents are expected to comply with the reasonable directions of university officials who are addressing or investigating possible policy violations or emergency situations. The staff will document their interactions and any concerns during their rounds.

Residential Room/ Unit Entry

The University reserves the right to access a student room, or residential unit, to determine compliance with the provisions of applicable multiple dwelling laws and/or for improvement and repairs, with advance notice of residents. Periodic inspections and maintenance visits are to be expected. Fire drills and checking fire safety equipment do not require advance notice of residents. Advance notice is provided in the break closing information received by all students before break periods. During break closings, residents’ rooms will be checked for health and safety concerns by staff.

There may be entry without notice in emergencies where imminent danger to life, safety, security, health or property is reasonably feared or if there is a belief that a student(s) room/unit is being used for the purposes of violating a policy or law.

The Vice President for Student Life or the Dean of Students & Campus Life must authorize any without-notice room entry except those conducted by law enforcement officers for official searches. The student involved will be informed of the purpose of the search and whether any material is found and confiscated in violation of federal, state or local law or of University regulations. Students must be present when search is conducted. If student(s) cannot be located the residential location will be secured until the student(s) can be present. If drugs, paraphernalia, or weapons are discovered during a search, the local law enforcement agency will be contacted to take possession of the items.

Room Assignments and Changes

Students residing in university residencies are not permitted to move to an off-campus location, move to another room, change to another building or within the same building without prior permission from Residence Life.

No room or room changes are granted if concerned students have not addressed their concerns directly with their roommate(s). Successful roommate pairings do not always involve students who consider their roommate a best friend, but often describe a relationship and room environment that is restful, friendly and respectful. Learning to live with a roommate takes time and work and the Residential Life staff is committed to helping roommates learn skills that will enable them to have a good living experience. The following steps are required in almost all situations before a room change is considered:

  • An initial discussion with roommates to determine problem identification and with compromises with or without the RA.
  • The RA/CA and residents will re-examine the roommate(s) agreement for additions, deletions or the drafting a new roommate agreement. Students are asked to honestly implement the revised/new agreement during the following 14 days.
  • If issues remain unresolved, residents will talk with their Professional Staff member and Resident Assistant about a mediation to resolve any issues of tension or conflict.
  • If roommate issues are not resolved, after the mediation, roommates should contact their Professional Staff member about other methods of resolving the conflict.

After all these measures have been tried and a resident still finds his/her living arrangements unacceptable, a resident may request a room change. No requests are granted for roommate changes until the third week of the academic semester unless deemed necessary by the Professional Staff member.

If the Professional Staff member finds a room change necessary, the resident making the complaint will be the one to move out. In a case where both students initiated a complaint, both students will be given the opportunity to move to different spaces. The Professional Staff member and Resident/ Community Assistant stay neutral in roommate disagreements and conflicts and try their best to work with students’ living situations. The Professional Staff member keeps waiting lists for all units and will contact students as space becomes available for approved moves.

The University reserves the right to assign another student to a partial vacancy or to require a student to move from a partial vacancy to another room. In order to accommodate all students applying for space, it may be necessary to assign students to temporary accommodations. Withdrawals and cancellations will permit these students to be transferred to permanent rooms. When vacancies in permanent rooms occur, temporary spaces must be vacated, upon request of the Office of Residence Life. Space may not be sold, loaned to another student for free or compensation.

Room Check-In and Check-Out

At the beginning of each academic year, both the Facilities Management staff and the Resident/Community Assistants complete an inventory of each residence hall room. This is to ensure that each room is clean, that all items in the room are functioning properly, and that all necessary furniture is present. Residents are then responsible for verifying the good condition of their room upon arrival at check-in. If an item is missing or not in good condition, the resident must file a work order with Facilities Management so that the condition can be rectified.

Whenever a resident moves into another room or unit during the academic year he/she should fill out a new room condition inventory. It is the student’s responsibility to record any pre-existing damage. Any damage beyond what was recorded at check-in will be assessed as damage and charged back to residents at or after checkout. At check-in, students are given a room key and outside door key in some instances. Most of the facilities have proximal technology and require entrance with a student ID card. When any student moves out of a room, suite or unit for any reason, a formal checkout with the RA/CA staff must occur to avoid improper checkout penalties. At checkout time the resident and a staff member will go review the room inventory and record any damages. Any resident failing to check out properly will be assessed an improper check out fee of $25 as well as costs for key(s) replacement, lock change and new unit keys.

The Office of Facilities Management with the Office of Residence Life will make a closing room check at the end of the academic year. Any missing items or damage to walls, woodwork, furniture, floors, window treatments, windows and screens, etc., not reported at the time of original occupancy will be corrected and the cost will be charged to resident(s) of the room. Rooms are to be left in their original condition, with trash disposed of and floors swept.

Graduating Seniors will be subject to a Pre-Inspection Process prior to Graduation Day. The Pre-Inspection is completed to assist all students in identifying any billable damage, cleaning concerns, or missing/damaged furniture.

Community Damage

Cost of damage to common areas will be assessed to all residents of the area or living unit in question, should the responsible party or parties be unknown. This is in keeping with the philosophy that residents are members of a community and therefore should make an effort to hold each other accountable within that area. If a resident witnesses another student damaging university property, it is the resident’s responsibility to report the incident so the responsible party bears the cost of the damage rather than the community members. Common areas include recreational, study or main rooms in all traditional residential facilities. In suite units and townhouses, the common area is anything in the unit with the exception of individual unit bedrooms. Damages to common area furniture, recreational furniture, TVs, beverage or snack machines, microwaves, walls, stairwells, bathrooms, etc. which cannot be assigned to individual residents are charged equally to every student living in the residential facility. Common area furniture taken to rooms/units or from the facility can result in community or individual fines for replacement.

Dining Services / Evert Dining Room

All students residing in university-owned living facilities (with the exception of Liberty Alley Apartments and 18th Street Commons) are required to have a Board Plan. The university ID card, properly validated, is the meal ticket intended for the student's use only. Students on a meal plan who fail to bring their ID for entrance to any dining facility may obtain a temporary ID card from the Dining Services office for a one-dollar fee. Individuals cannot remove food from the Evert Dining room. Good conduct, good manners, proper dress and footwear are required of students, faculty and staff in all dining venues. Persons who behave in an inappropriate manner in on-campus dining facilities are subject to disciplinary action under the Code of Student Conduct. Non-board plan students wishing to charge meals may do so with prior approval from the Director of Dining Services.

Maintenance and Work Orders

The Office of Facilities Management is responsible for completing maintenance in all university residential facilities. Students should place a work order on mySU and/or the SU311 app to report maintenance needs or concerns. Residents are expected to also participate in the maintenance of the residence halls. Broken or malfunctioning items within student rooms should be reported immediately so they can be repaired or replaced. In the event that a report is made but the condition persists, residents are expected to notify the Office of Facilities Management until the situation is rectified or information is received indicating that the problem cannot be fixed.

Room Entry

  • Routine Community Rounds: University officials, including paraprofessional staff, make daily, routine rounds of the residence halls for the purposes of community development and being a consistent, accessible presence. They reserve the right to enter common area spaces in suites, apartments, townhouses, and houses to address safety and security concerns and to ensure compliance of university policies. Residents are expected to comply with the reasonable directions of university officials who are addressing or investigating possible policy violations.
  • Inspections and Maintenance Visits: The university makes periodic inspections of, and maintenance visits to, university residence hall rooms and living areas for reasons of health and wellness, safety, and maintenance. The university reserves the right to enter rooms at any time for the purpose of making these inspections and maintenance visits. Students who request work orders in their space will have the ability to schedule when Facilities will enter their room to complete requested work.
  • Searches and Seizure: A room may be searched and items seized if there is reasonable cause to believe that students are using their room for a purpose of violating university regulations, or violating federal, state or local law, or if a university official believes there is a safety and security violations or concerns within the room. Students who are on disciplinary probation as a result of being found “responsible” for violating the university alcohol or drug policies are subject to policy compliance checks, regardless of the “cause” while they are on disciplinary probation. The Vice President, Dean of Students or designee must authorize all room searches, except those conducted by law enforcement officers. University officials shall give the students involved the opportunity to be present during the search unless the students are unavailable. The students involved will be informed of the purpose of the search and whether any material is found to be in violation of federal, state or local laws and/or university regulation, or both.
  • Emergencies: Rooms may be entered without authorization in the event of an emergency, i.e., a situation in which a person's health or well-being is threatened and/or personal or university property is thought to be in immediate danger.

Animals / Pets

Animals (with the exception of small fish in a 20 gallon or less tank or pre-approved service or comfort animals) are not permitted to be in the residence halls with the exception of live-in staff pets as outlined by the Pet Agreement. Any animal on university premises must be leashed and under control at all times and may not enter any campus building, including residence halls. Note: See the Service and Assistance Animals Policy in this Student Handbook.

Bicycles

Bicycles are plentiful at SU and a healthy way to get around campus. Storage of bicycles is not permitted inside a residence hall except in sanctioned bicycle storage areas located in some buildings. Please see the Office of Residence Life to obtain a list of storage rooms and a key to access the storage room closest to your residence hall. A limited number of bicycles are available from student activities for rent and use.

Students must remove bicycles from campus at the end of academic terms in which they are enrolled as a student. When returning a room key, the storage room key must also be returned to the Office of Residence Life. The University reserves the right to remove any bicycle in violation of this policy and will bill and/or fine the owner for the cost of the labor involved.

Cleanliness of Units and Grounds

Residential spaces must be kept in a clean and orderly condition at all times. Custodial service is provided for all common areas only. Cleaning of student rooms is the responsibility of the individual residents. Cleaning supplies and tools must be supplied by the student. Custodial services may determine a common area to be unclean; they have the right to remove and discard of personal items left in common areas at any time. This includes personal items that are left in bathrooms; and common areas such as kitchens/ kitchenettes and living rooms; personal items should be stored in a resident’s personal residence hall room at all times. Note that an administrative charge may be assessed to each individual who assumes responsibility for the common area due to the location of individual residence hall rooms to pay for additional time needed for excessive cleaning or disposal of personal items by housekeeping staff. Because of communal living, if it comes to the attention of a university official that a residence hall room poses a health or safety risk, the resident(s) of the room may be asked to rectify the situation as instructed.

Failure to maintain a student or student organization’s facilities or property or surrounding grounds so as to prevent danger to health and safety of members of the University community is prohibited.

Decoration Policy

Students may personalize their residence hall room but may not make structural changes to common or personal areas. Residents may hang items on walls using poster putty, removable hooks (3M or Command M) or thumb tacks. The use of nails is prohibited. Repairs to walls will be charged back to the residents of the room. Restrictions include:

  • No part of the room, suite or house may be painted. Borders and/or wallpaper are also prohibited.
  • Standing any kind of object or container on outside windows, ledges, porches or roofs is prohibited. No alcohol containers or related items may be displayed in/on windowsills.
  • Empty alcohol bottles/cans and paraphernalia are not permitted in rooms where an occupant is under 21.
  • (i.e. Empty alcohol bottles as vases, filled with fluorescent fluid, alcohol boxes hung on walls, etc.)
  • Dartboards and free-standing bars are not permitted in residence hall rooms or university-owned houses.
  • If students provide their own window covering, they must do so without damaging or altering the room. University’s in-window shades or pull blinds must remain in the window and be shut during breaks.
  • Outside decorations may be displayed if they are a part of a university-sponsored event. Facilities Management and Residence Life reserve the right to restrict or prohibit outdoor decorations.

Electrical Appliances

Reflecting fire safety and electrical concerns, residents are limited in the use of electrical appliances and cooking devices they may store in personal residence hall rooms. One coffee pot (12-cup maximum), Keurig® or similar machine is permitted in each personal residence hall room. It must have a two-hour maximum automatic shut-off feature. Prohibited items include, but are not limited to personal or propane grills, electric blankets, air-conditioners, portable heating units of any kind, dehumidifiers (unless provided by Facilities Management), microwaves over 700 watts, and refrigerators over 5 cubic feet.

Students can rent a microfridge from microfridge.com. Microfridges include a 2.13 cubic foot refrigerator, a.74 cubic foot freezer, and a 700 watt microwave. Microfridges are delivered before move-in day, are maintained by Microfridge, and include a sensor in the microwave that will turn off the microwave if it detects smoke. Kitchen appliances, particularly those with an exposed heating unit, are prohibited in personal residence hall rooms. This includes, but is not limited to, hot plates, toasters, blender, electric frying pans, broilers and griddles. They may be stored and used in kitchens / kitchenette areas within the common areas of residence halls at the owner’s own risk. Appliances stored in common areas must be unplugged and restored immediately after use. Kitchen appliances may not be stored or used in personal residence hall rooms.

University officials reserve the right to request the removal of any appliance on university premises that may pose a safety or security risk.

Community Appliances

The University may provide a range, microwave, or mini-fridge in common areas of the residence halls. Community appliances may never be left unattended while in use and must be cleaned after use. Damage or excessive clean-up charges unable to be attributed to an individual(s) will be charged back to the residents of the living unit.

Extension Cords

Extension cords must be suitably sized for the appliance or device they are supplying. Common household extension cords are generally not suitable for powering appliances or devices that use a lot of electricity. Overloading extension cords causes them to heat to a point that could melt their covering and cause a fire. Another frequently found related issue is running extension cords under rugs, carpets or furniture, which allows them to heat up to unsafe levels. Generally speaking, an extension cord that is used to power an appliance must be replaced by a suitable hardwired outlet within reach of an appliance's factory installed cord. Household electrical extension cords may not be used on campus. These cords are only two prong cords and do not have a grounding safety prong on them. Unless 3-prong outlets are not available in a room on campus, only three prong extension cords, power strips or surge protectors may be used for all appliances or electronics.

Fire Safety and Restrictions

Fire safety is critical in community living. Fire extinguishers, fire alarm systems and other fire prevention and protection equipment are provided in university buildings as a safeguard for lives and property. Attaching items to smoke detectors or sprinklers, tampering with fire bells or alarms, pull stations, extinguishers, hoses, exit signs, instruction signs, sprinkler systems and the rendering of a false alarm are all prohibited and subject to the Code of Student Conduct. The Department of Public Safety conducts regular fire drills in the residence halls. Students receive instructions for their specific living unit at the beginning of the academic year. Individuals are required to vacate a building when a fire alarm sounds or when asked to do so by a university official. The following are not permitted unless stated:

  • Fire pits, unless provided by the university, are not permitted on university premises.
  • No fabric may be hung from ceilings or draped over doorways.
  • Miniature decoration lights (i.e. Christmas lights, novelty lights) cannot be attached to room fixtures using metal fasteners (white adhesive putty is recommended) or used in any other manner contrary to manufacturers' recommendations.
  • Halogen lamps, live trees or wreaths, all candles (new or burnt wick), open flames (including tiki torches), objects that emit vapor or smoke including fog machines or e-cigarettes or similar objects, and the burning of incense are prohibited and will result in the confiscation and/or disposal of the item in question.
  • The possession or use of fireworks on university premises is prohibited. Fireworks are defined as any substance prepared for the purpose of producing a visible or audible effect by combustion, explosion or detonation.
  • For religious exemptions to this policy, please contact the Director of Residence Life who will confer with the Chaplain to the University about appropriate accommodations.

Each residence hall room and common area, including those in group-housing living areas, have an occupancy limit due to fire codes. These limits will be posted in common areas. Exceeding the limit of individuals in a room or common area is prohibited.

Furnishings

Student rooms contain a set of furnishings for each resident of a room (bed, mattress, desk, chair, and dresser) In addition, traditional rooms also have screens on the windows and closet doors. Common area furniture varies in the type of unit. Room and common area furniture may not be removed from the room or dismantled or altered in any way. Having lounge/common area furniture in personal residence rooms is also prohibited. Beds may be raised no more than 12 inches off the ground. Cinder blocks (lying horizontally) or store-bought risers are permitted; however, if at any time a university official deems a riser unsafe, the student must remove it. Beds placed on desks, radiators, windowsills, etc., constitute a safety violation. Self-constructed lofts are prohibited.

Guests

Within the residence halls at Susquehanna University, a “guest” is defined as any individual who is found in a residence hall or residence hall room who is not officially assigned to live there by the Office of Residence Life. A roommate must be consulted and give consent prior to inviting a guest to stay overnight in the residence hall room. The rights of a student to privacy, quiet, etc. are paramount and take precedence over the desire of a roommate to have guests in the room. An individual may be an overnight guest in a residence hall for a maximum of two nights in any given two-week period. A person may not be an overnight guest of more than one resident per two-week period. In addition, a host may not have more than one overnight guest in a two-week period. Any individual staying as a guest who is not a Susquehanna University student must obtain a guest pass from Public Safety and keep it on their person during their entire time they remain a guest on campus.

Guest Passes must be obtained in the Public Safety Office (open 24 hours a day: (570) 372 – 4444, or ext: 4444 from any campus phone). A pass must be obtained upon arriving to campus. Guests must provide the following information:

  • A cell phone number
  • The name of the Susquehanna University student host and his or her cell phone number
  • The building and room number of the host’s on-campus residence
  • A name of an emergency contact and his or her number (i.e. parent or legal guardian)
  • The reason for the visit (this should include the particular department who invited the guest to campus - i.e. field hockey recruit, prospective student from Admissions, Music Department recruit, etc.)
  • The name of the Coordinating Administrator and his or her contact number (if the guest is a prospective student)
  • The dates of the visit.

Students may serve as hosts to guests through athletic teams and departments.

Guests may be asked to provide this information to the administrator responsible for coordinating their visit. If a Guest Pass is given to a guest by a Coordinating Administrator, the guest does not need to go to Public Safety to obtain another pass. Guests are obligated to spend the night in their host’s residence hall room unless previously instructed by an administrator or coach.

Hosts (Susquehanna University students) are responsible for the conduct of their guests on university premises and at functions sponsored by the university or any student organization. Hosts may be held responsible for their guest’s behavior. All guests are subject to university regulations.

Should a guest be found without his or her Guest Pass or violating university policy, they may be arrested by the Selinsgrove Borough Police for trespassing and/or asked to leave campus.

Keys

Each student receives a key to his or her room, a key to the exterior door of the residence hall if the hall is not outfitted with an electronic locking mechanism, and a key to resident’s suite in suite-style residence halls that have locks. Students are expected to sign out a key to their room and house/townhouse (where applicable) from the Office of Residence Life upon arrival or each time they move to another building or room at any time during the academic year. Keys must be returned to a location designated by Residence Life at the end of the academic year, when a student changes residence or upon leaving the institution. Students may obtain a key receipt by returning their keys to Residence Life during business hours.

Lost, stolen or missing keys must be reported to the Office of Residence Life within 24 hours of the student becoming aware of the loss. Students who lose or do not return a room key, exterior door key or bike storage key will be charged for changing of locks and replacements of new keys. Residence Life staff reserves the right to change a room or exterior door key upon receiving information that a key is missing.

Keys issued by the university may not be duplicated in any fashion. Students may not loan a key assigned to them to any other person. Students may not be in possession of a key that is not assigned to them. Students are always responsible for the key(s) they are assigned.

Laundry Facilities

Laundry units consisting of a washer/dryer set are available to students based on the number of occupants in a residence hall/residential area. Damage to washer/dryer will be charged to the residents of the residence hall or residential area should the responsible party or parties be unknown. Students are expected to remove clothing from machines at the completion of a laundry cycle and use the machines for the purpose of which they were intended.

Noise Level

With the understanding that noise travels from community to community within the residence halls (“up and down” and “side to side”), students are expected to respect the right of others to live, study and sleep in a quiet environment at all times. Therefore, residents are expected to use discretion where noise is concerned and refrain from activities that have the potential to create excessive noise or a disruptive environment for others.

Quiet Hours: For all residence halls, noise should not be heard outside of one’s personal residence hall room with the door closed. For apartments, townhouses or houses noise should not be heard outside of the unit or between units. Please note that Quiet Hours are extended during midterm and final exams and any other time as determined by a university official.

Quiet hours occur from:
10 p.m. – 8 a.m. Sunday through Thursday
Midnight – 10 a.m. Friday and Saturday

Courtesy Hours: As a guideline, noise should not negatively impact others in the residential unit or living area.

Excessive Noise: Any noise deemed disruptive to the ability to sleep and by other residential students. Excessive noise is prohibited at all times. Sound should be kept on a low volume at all times. This includes but is not limited to talking voices, electronic devices and instruments. Residents reserve the right and are encouraged to politely enforce courtesy hours with one another in an entire residence hall.

Speakers, of any sort, may not be placed on windowsills and/or directed outside or used at levels which negatively impact individuals or the community with noise or vibration.

Personal Property

Students are responsible for the care and safety of their own personal property. The university cannot be held liable directly or indirectly for loss of, or damage to, the personal property of individuals. Students are urged to confirm whether their personal property is covered under their parents' or guardians’ homeowners' insurance policy and to make arrangements for additional insurance coverage if necessary. It is suggested that students keep serial numbers of expensive equipment with a family member.

Smoking

All campus buildings (including residence halls) are completely smoke-free which includes smoking tobacco products or any devices that emit smoke or vapor (including e-cigarettes and other devices). Those who smoke outside of campus buildings are required to stay more than 25 feet from an entrance or window and are asked to use the ashtrays that are located outside building entrances for the disposal of cigarettes and cigars.

Solicitation/Fundraising

The solicitation of sales, services, memberships, or gifts on campus, including residence halls, without the permission of the Dean of Students & Campus Life or a designee is prohibited. No fundraising activity may involve the solicitation/completion of a credit card application.

In accordance with the University’s policy on partisan political activity, no political fundraising may take place on campus, including the solicitation of campaign contributions and the sale of campaign materials. While campus individuals and organizations are free to collaborate on event funding or to request funds from bodies constituted for the purpose of providing funding for campus events (Student Government Association), individuals and organizations are not permitted to issue blanket and/or anonymous appeals on campus for contributions to events. Non-University-related individuals, groups, or organizations may not solicit for funds or sell goods or services in residence halls.

Sports in the Hall

For reasons of safety and maintaining courtesy hours within the residence halls, sports and other related activities are not permitted to be played anywhere within any residence hall (this includes personal residence hall rooms). This includes but is not limited to hockey, skateboarding, soccer, Frisbee throwing, water fights, snowball fights, bouncing balls, running, weight lifting and the use of other exercise equipment.

Student Identification

Students are required to carry their Susquehanna identification card and upon request of authorized university personnel, including Residence Life staff, library staff, dining hall staff and Public Safety staff, students must present their identification cards. Students may not forge, alter or loan their identification card to others. Students may not loan their Student identification card to another person and students may not be in possession of an identification card that belongs to another person. There is a $20.00 replacement cost for second or subsequent Student Identification cards.

Summer Session Living on Campus

During the time between the end of spring semester and the start of fall semester, also known as summer session or summer term, students are still bound by the policies outlined in the Student Handbook and Code of Student Conduct. This is applicable to any individual (regardless of the academic institution they are permanently enrolled in) who is working, researching, interning, volunteering, taking classes or involved in any other activity at Susquehanna.

Summer Session may also employ additional policies in conjunction with standard Student Handbook regulations that are unique to the activities a student may be participating in. Students should inquire directly with the department or supervisor overseeing them to familiarize themselves with any such policies.

Unauthorized Entry or Use of Facilities

No student, group of students or student organization (including Greek chapters) shall make or attempt to make unauthorized use of any university building, office, property or other facility. Upon appropriate notice by university officials, authorization for the use of university facilities and premises may be withdrawn or otherwise restricted.

Examples of prohibited conduct include, but are not limited to:

  • accessing storage areas, attics, basements, second-floor porches (unless approved by Facilities), balconies, or roofs of buildings (including Greek houses and residence halls). Any items, personal or organizational, found to have been illegally stored in restricted areas will be discarded immediately and without notice at the organization or residents’ expense.
  • tampering with locks or other security devices.
  • sleeping in common areas of residence halls
  • having more than one individual in a shower stall at a time
  • defacing University property (spray painting, using sidewalk chalk, etc.)
  • throwing anything from windows, balconies or doorways of university facilities
  • being in a residence hall unaccompanied by a host who is a resident assigned to live in that building

For further information see Facility Usage Responsibilities under “Policies for Campus Events and Advertising.”

Additional Group Housing Standards

Group housing includes housing that is designed to house three or more individuals in a suite, apartment, townhouse, or house.

Policies outlined for group housing are in addition to those found in the Code of Student Conduct and any other policy document relating to student housing on campus. Any violation of the standards will result in any applicable notice being directed to the organization and/or individuals that inhabit the space in question. This may include, but is not limited to, documentation for violation of university policy, assessment of fines or cleaning/disposal fees and loss of the privilege of living in the space.

Notice of violations may come from the Office of Residence Life (including Resident Assistants), Greek Life, the Office of Facilities Management (including housekeeping staff) or the Department of Public Safety.

Bathrooms

The existing campus policy for common area bathrooms will be enforced in group housing units. No storage of personal items/toiletries is allowed in the bathrooms, unless there is an existing cabinet or shelf provided. Items left in other locations, especially those impeding proper cleaning, will be discarded without notice. Other areas include, but are not limited to, the tops/counters of vanities, in showers/tubs, added hooks/racks, etc.

Billings/Damages

Bedroom damages will be billed to the individual resident(s) of that room. Common area damages or excessive clean-up charges unable to be attributed to an individual(s) will be billed to all building residents.

It is the responsibility of the group housing residents to reconcile damages that were caused by other members of their organization. Prior to the end of the semester billing cycle, non-residents may come forward and report responsibility to the Office of Residence Life in order to have the charges removed from the accounts of the residents. An on-line appeal regarding damages will be available on MySU after damages are posted. Appeals must be completed on MySU.

Furniture

Bedroom furniture will be provided by the university. The university does not provide electronic equipment such as computers, televisions, DVD players, etc. for the common areas of houses. Existing equipment will not be maintained or replaced by the university.

Common area furniture will be provided by the University

Additional furniture (two chairs or one couch) can be self-provided as long as it meets fire and safety inspection standards. At any time, university staff may deem the amount of furniture excessive and officially request that items be removed by the residents of the housing area.

All personal items, including excess furniture, must be removed from the house at the end of the spring semester. Failure to comply with this directive will result in the removal of the items at the organization or residents’ expense.

General Condition

It is expected that all areas of group housing common areas, both interior and exterior, will be maintained in a clean, orderly fashion. If, at any time, a house is found to be deficient of this standard, the residents may receive an official request to rectify the situation.

The university also reserves the right to rectify areas of concern without notifying the residents beforehand if they present a distinct life safety or property concern and levying appropriate sanctions as this document serves as a first, official warning against the creation of disorderly or unattractive conditions.

Grills

Residents may not purchase or bring gas grills of any kind for individual or unit use onto university premises. Outside grills located at the 18th Street Commons community building may not be left unattended while in use and must be cleaned after use.

Residents are permitted to use charcoal grills from August 30 until November 1 and from April 1 until May 15. They must be removed when not in use and outside of these dates. Summer residents are encouraged to use the gas grills in the 18th Street Commons area. Lighter fluid and self-starter charcoal may not be stored in residential units. Each living area may only have one grill. The only exception to this policy is for events that have officially been registered with the Assistant Director of Student Activities. Multiple grills can be used during an officially sanctioned event but must be removed at the end of the event.

Grills must be in good condition and have no greater than 830 square inches of cooking surface.

Grills may only be used a minimum of 15 feet from any structure, including but not limited to houses, garages and trees.

Charcoal briquettes must be disposed of properly after they’ve cooled (not thrown on the ground).

Flames from grills may not exceed the height of the cook surface. Group living units can be asked at any time to remove grills or desist in using them.

Failure to adhere to university policy and general safety standards in the use of grills may result in a house losing the privilege of having a grill.

Grills will not be stored on campus over the summer and any grills left behind will be removed and discarded at the organization or residents’ expense.

Exterior of Houses

Nothing that is conspicuous, violation of any other policy, or in bad taste will be permitted on the visible exterior of the house at any time. This includes, but is not limited to, porches, yards, driveways and windows. Patio furniture is permitted from August 30 until November 1 and from April 1 until May 15. It must be pre-approved by the Office of Facilities Management before being placed outside. Residents of group housing can be asked at any time to remove approved or unapproved patio furniture.

Organizations wishing to have identifying letters visible from the outside of their house must provide their own letters. Letters must be submitted to the Office of Facilities Management for approval and installation.

Kitchenettes

A refrigerator, range, microwave and sink or some combination of these may be provided by the university in group living units.

Any other small appliances must be provided by the residents and removed at the end of the academic year. The university may choose to limit the number of self-provided appliances at any time.

Pouring grease down drains and potato peels in garbage disposals is prohibited because these are likely sources of damage to pipes and disposals.

At the end of the spring semester, before the last resident leaves a group housing unit, the following items must be completed: All food must be disposed of and cupboards and refrigerators cleaned.

All cooking/eating implements must be clean and stored in cupboards if the same group will reside in the property during the next academic year. Anything dirty or not properly stored will be discarded.

Storage of Personal Items

The Office of Residence Life and Office of Facilities Management works closely with students who require personal storage over summer break. Limited storage is available for international students and students with special circumstances.

Organizational items for those living on the Avenue may be stored in closets or the shed behind 310 University Avenue (Greek letter organizations). Personal items can not be stored in organizational spaces. Access to this shed can be obtained from the Director of Student Leadership & Engagement or designee.

Personal items found on campus grounds at the conclusion of the academic year will be discarded at the organization or residents’ expense.

Local storage units are available in the Selinsgrove area for the storage of personal belongings that a residential student does not want to take home for the summer.

Missing Student Policy

Any Campus Security Authority may be immediately contacted when a student or employee believes a student who lives in on-campus student housing has been missing for twenty-four hours or anytime a student is missing and the circumstances are not known or there is reason to believe the student may be in danger.

The purpose of this policy is to establish a framework for cooperation among members of the university community aimed at locating and assisting students who are reported missing. A student shall be deemed missing when absent from the university for more than 24 hours without any known reason. All reports of missing students shall be immediately referred to the Department of Public Safety, which shall investigate each report and make a determination whether the student is missing in accordance with this policy.

Every student living in on-campus student housing, regardless of age, shall have the opportunity to identify one or more persons to be contacted by the university in case a student is determined to be missing. Students are offered this option to provide this information to the Dean of Students and Campus Life in writing or by phone at 570-372-4139 each year, regardless of whether the student has identified contact persons in previous years. Contact information will be registered confidentially, accessible only to authorized campus officials and will not be disclosed to external parties except law enforcement personnel in furtherance of a missing person investigation.

If a missing student is under 18 years of age and not emancipated, the Department will notify a custodial parent or guardian of the missing student not later than 24hours after the determination by the Department that the student is missing in addition to notifying any additional contact person designated by the student.

The Department will also notify the Selinsgrove Borough Police Department not later than 24 hours after it determines that the student is missing.