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Susquehanna University acknowledges that each person may experience and respond to incidents of sexual misconduct and gender based violence in a variety ways. As a result, we offer numerous options for student support. You can find information related to support/counseling services, accommodations, reporting, and prevention efforts available at the University on this page. We recognize that at any given point your needs may change. It is appropriate to utilize different forms of response and support at different points throughout your time on campus.

What is sexual misconduct and gender-based violence?

Sexual misconduct and gender-based violence are umbrella terms for any harm that is perpetrated against a person’s will, and that results from power inequalities that are based on gender roles. It can include any act that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivations of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life. Sexual misconduct and gender-based violence principally can affect anyone, across all cultures and/or identities. (HHRI, 2018).

Trigger Warning

The following page depicts discussion of relationship violence, sexual violence and stalking, which may be triggering to some individuals. Help is available 24/7. View the student resource guide for more information about 24/7 resources.

Relationship Violence

A pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another person. This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound someone. (Office of Violence Against Women, 2017).

— Domestic Violence

— Dating Violence

Relationship violence can include physical, sexual, emotional, economic or psychological abuse.

Types of Abuse

Physical Abuse

This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound someone. (Office of Violence Against Women, 2017).

Sexual Abuse

Coercing or attempting to make any sexual contact or behavior without consent. In the context of domestic and dating relationships this can include, but is not limited to: forcing a partner as part of the relationship, forcing someone to have sex in a way that denies one’s sexual or gender identity, posting or sharing sexually explicit photographs of a partner without their consent (Adapted from: Office of Violence Against Women, 2017).

Emotional Abuse

Undermining an individual’s sense of self-worth and/or self-esteem. This may include, but is not limited to: constant criticism, diminishing one’s abilities or identities, damaging one’s relationship with their friends or family, or gaslighting (Adapted from: Office of Violence Against Women, 2017).

Economic Abuse

Making or attempting to make an individual financially dependent by maintain total control over financial resources. Examples include: showing up at someone’s place of employment incessantly, convincing someone to call off routinely, or putting the person on an allowance or restricting their money (Adapted from: Office of Violence Against Women, 2017).

Psychological Abuse

Causing fear by intimidation, threatening physical harm to self, partner, animals, friends, etc., and forcing isolation from friends, organizations, family, school and/or work (Office of Violence Against Women, 2017).

Not only does relationship violence have an effect on those being abused, but also those who are surrounded by it, such as friends, family, co-workers, classmates, etc. If you or someone you know is being effected help is available. Learn about resources on and off-campus.

Develop a Safety Plan

Stalking

Stalking is a pattern of repeated and unwanted attention, harassment, contact, or any other course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear. Stalking behaviors include, but are not limited to:

  • Repeated, unwanted, intrusive, and frightening communications via phone, mail, or email.
  • Repeatedly leaving or sending survivor unwanted items, presents, or flowers.
  • Following or lying in wait for the survivor at places such as their residence hall, work, businesses they frequent, outside of their classrooms, etc.
  • Making direct or indirect threats to harm the survivor, themselves, the survivor’s friends, pets, etc.
  • Damaging or threatening to damage the survivor’s property.
  • Harassing survivor through the internet.
  • Posting information/spreading rumors about the survivor on the internet, in a public place or via a third party person.
  • Obtaining personal information about the survivor by accessing public records, using internet search services, going through the survivor’s belongings without their consent, following the survivor, or the survivor’s friends, place of employment, professors, etc. (Adapted from: Stalking Resource Center, National center for Victims of Crime 2016).

Not only does stalking have an effect on those being abused, but also those who are surrounded by it, such as friends, family, co-workers, classmates, etc. If you or someone you know is being effected help is available. Learn about resources on and off-campus.

Develop a Safety Plan

Sexual Violence

Sexual Violence is any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs without the explicit consent of the recipient (Office of Violence Against Women, 2017). Some forms of sexual violence are illegal, such as rape or posting or sharing photos without consent, often called revenge porn. Others are not illegal such as sexually violent jokes, street harassment or cat calling, but this does not make them any less harmful to a person. Sexual violence can happen to anyone regardless of culture or identity (PCAR, 2017). It can include words and actions of a sexual nature including, but not limited to:

  • Attempted or completed rape
  • Attempted or completed incest
  • Attempted or completed acquaintance rape
  • Grabbing, groping, fondling
  • Sexting without consent
  • Posting or sharing photos without consent, often called revenge porn
  • Sexual harassment
  • Exposure or voyeurism
  • Forced/coerced participation in the production of pornography or pornographic videos

A person may use force, threats, manipulation or coercion to commit any of the types of sexual violence listed above (PCAR, 2017).

Not only does sexual violence have an effect on those being abused, but also those who are surrounded by it, such as friends, family, co-workers, classmates, etc. If you or someone you know is being effected help is available. Learn about resources on and off-campus.

Develop a Safety Plan

Please know first and foremost that we believe you and that you are not alone.

This website includes information on your:

  • You haveRIGHTS.
  • Reporting isn't the only option you have. There are many RESOURCES available to meet your needs.
  • Our local victim/survivor services agency is available on campus and via a 24/7 hotline. Learn more about their SERVICES.
  • If you’re fearful about reporting, please know that SU does not tolerate retaliation.

If this incident occurred within the last 5 days, please consider immediate medical attention.

Evangelical Community Hospital

Available 24 hours a day, a survivor can go to the hospital for evaluation and treatment related to sexual assault incidents. An advocate from Transitions (1-800-850-7948/24-hour hotline) can take you to the hospital and sit with you during any of the following procedures. These include, but are not limited to:

Forensic Rape Exam: to collect evidence that a survivor may have acquired over the course of an assault. Local police will be called to collect the forensic kit , but a survivor will never be forced to speak with an officer at the hospital.

Physical Exam: to assess, document and treat injuries

Emergency Contraception: to help prevent pregnancy

STD/HIV Medications: To assist with the prevention of developing several common STDs and HIV

The cost of any of the above procedures is covered by the Victim’s Compensation Fund.

Located at: One Hospital Drive, Lewisburg, PA 17837, (570) 522-2770

Survivors and Victims Handbook Cover

Electronic Reporting

Students have the ability to make a report regarding an incident of sexual misconduct or gender-based violence 24 hours a day via the electronic reporting form.

If the report includes demographic information about the survivor, the Title IX Coordinator will follow-up with the survivor upon receiving the report.

If an anonymous report is filed, it will be shared with Public Safety for Safety and Security Report as part of The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. To find the most recent report click here.

There are several laws that dictate how Susquehanna University must respond when an incident of gender based violence occurs. These laws include:

Title IX

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal mandated that prohibits sex discrimination in education. Sex discrimination includes incidents of sexual harassment and assault. The Department of Education has released several documents that provide guidance to colleges and universities about the ways in which incidents of sexual harassment and assault must be investigated. To find out more information about Title IX regulations on campus click here. To find out more about Title IX requirements in general related to sexual harassment and assault click here.

Call 570-372-4404 to speak with the Title IX Coordinator. Located in the Office of Human Resources: Selinsgrove Hall, First Floor.

Violence Against Women Act

VAWA supports investigation and prosecution of violent crimes against women. The act, which was reauthorized in 2013, makes it easier to prosecute crimes against women, including gender based violence incidents.

Campus Sexual Violence Elimination (SaVE) Act

SaVE Act is a law that helps increase transparency on campus about incidents of gender based violence, specifically sexual violence. It guarantees survivors enhanced rights, sets standards for disciplinary proceedings, and requires campus wide prevention education program. It was signed into law in 2013.

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act

The Clery Act requires colleges and universities that receive federal funding to disseminate a public annual security report (ASR) to employees and students every October 1st. This ASR must include statistics of campus crime for the preceding three calendar years, plus details about efforts taken to improve campus safety. ASRs must also include policy statements regarding (but not limited to) crime reporting, campus facility security and access, law enforcement authority, incidence of alcohol and drug use, and the prevention of/response to gender based violence. To find the most recent report click here. You can file an incident of gender based violence here.